Blower Motor Temperature Sensor on 107

Does anone happen to know what that little sensor on the 107 blower motor is supposed to do?
Thanks in advance.
Todd    

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Jim Lang wrote:

I have a 116, which shares some of the same design. Are you talking about a little button shaped switch with two wires that is on the blower housing? If so, on the 116, that is the switch for the auxilliary water pump. It shuts the pump off after the heater has reached operating temp.
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On 2 Jun 2006 04:54:17 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Yes! That makes sense. Thanks very much. :-) Do you happen to know if these go bad, and how to tell?
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Jim Lang wrote:

It's just a simple bi-metalic switch, so it's not the highest failure rate widget. It opens up when the heater air gets warm and turns off the little aux heat pump. I can look up the exact temp for you, but as I recall it should go from closed to open around 70-80 degrees. You can check it with an meter and if it opens/closes around there, its good
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Do these things fail very often? Now I;m wondering if my ocassional loss of heat at low speeds could be caused by a defective switch?
Terry
On 2 Jun 2006 04:54:17 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

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Terry Breen wrote:

Don't know for sure, but I would think they are fairly reliable. It's just a simple bi-metalic switch that's widely used in all kinds of apps. Plus it's located in a secure, dry location inside the car. Mine is 26 years old and still works.
On the other hand, the aux water pumps are real pieces of crap and have a pretty high failure rate. With the car turned off, you can use a couple of jumpers to power the aux pump directly from the battery and you should hear it run. If it doesn't then the pump is kaput.
Start the car up when it's been out at night or day when you know it's 50 or below. There is an easy to pull connector on the wire going to the aux pump. Verify that you have 12V coming to the connector. Reconnect it and drive the car for a couple miles with the heat on. When you return, pull the connector again and you should have 0 volts. You may also be able to tell if the pump is not running from sound, but it can be hard with the engine running.
If it passes tho
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Thanks very much for thie analysis. I'll check it out.
Jim
On 4 Jun 2006 07:52:57 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

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