CLK Question

My wife's Cabriolet CLK wouldn't start this morning. She said she spilled a "little" diet Coke in the gear shift area and thought that may be the
problem, so when it dried out, it will start now but will not go into gear. I've wiggled the steering wheel (it's not locked up) and have the brake on...any ideas why the vehicle will start but not go out of park?
Thanks in advance,
John Lovin snipped-for-privacy@charter.net
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OMG!!! The Pepsi Syndrome!!!
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Err. Going out on a limb here, but do you think it could have anything to do with the Coke your wife poured into the Gear Selector Module? The fix is simple. Just have a new Selector Module fitted. Should only cost a few hundred /$.

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Back on the sugar . Except for rare exception, like hard drives, most electronic boards, switches, etc. can be cleaned by the use of the proper cleaning fluid. Of course it is much easier and profitable (for the dealer) to replace the unit. There is no way I would pay for a new unit.

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Coke also contains phosphoric acid, the active ingredient in Naval Jelly, a very effective rust remover. It is corrosive. A staple of elementary school science fair projects is to dissolve something durable (teeth, bones, nails, etc.) in Coke (Pepsi, etc.). Keep it away from your electronics.
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Could try tipping some water down the same place... the water should dissolve the sticky mess left by the coke.
Or it's a matter of getting out the screwdriver...
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wrote:

I have waited for a more intelligent answer to your question. Since nobody replied, here is my opinion.
Soft drinks contain sugar that stays on the surface once the liquid dries. The reliability of electric contacts (if any) may become an issue. Sugar is not a lubricant either. You may be able to tell if the problem is electrical or mechanical
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Perhaps a bath in pure alcohol would do the trick, it would evaporate after
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Tektronix, at one time the largest manufacturer of oscilloscopes, had a large container, very much like a big washing machine, used to clean test equipment. A series of jets would spray the units that would come out looking like new. I don't know what liquid they used but I can make an attempt to find out. I have used an ordinary washing machine to clean a crappy Dumont scope. It cleaned so well that the graphite used inside of the potentiometers also disappeared. Tektronix used sealed potentiometers.
Vlad
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:-))))
I hope it's available on eBay! :-)
cp
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The problem may not be related to the "little" diet Coke at all. Just coincidence. Vlad
wrote:

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