Convert 240D to biodiesel

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I have done some searches and came up with lots of hits about making your own fuel. This is not what interests me. Biodiesel is available locally at the same
price as regular diesel and I would like to convert my 1984 240D to biodiesel. I understand that there are certain hoses and gaskets that need replacing.
If anyone has done this I would appreciate some feedback. In particular: a list of the parts to be replaced, an approximate price, and info on what the new performance is.
I called the local MBZ dealer and he had no information.
TIA
JJ
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AFAIK there are no changes that need to be made. I ran my 1979 240D quite happily for over a year on biodiesel (until they closed the one and only station which carried it. GRRRR.) It was about 10% higher price than normal diesel, but I got a better than 10% mileage increase from it. Approx. 22mpg US with regular diesel, 26-28 with bio. Wish I could find some more.
Talked to my local MBZ mechanic. He had not heard of any changes that needed to be made. Don't know why anything different would be needed. It is still mostly dino fuel.
Rochelle
JollyJoe wrote:

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Biodiesel is designated Biodiesel 100 and Biodiesel 20, the 100 and 20 being the percentage of Biodiesel.
You should know that 100% Biodiesel will act as a solvent and dissolve old fuel residues inside the car's fuel system. These will be captured in the fuel filters so have some spare filters available. Apparently the 20% Biodiesel doesn't have that property.
The "conversion" that you mention is for those who want to run their engines on cooking grease to use a loose description. Basically, the grease congeals in cold weather and that "fuel" needs to be heated to fuel the engine. So diesel #2 is used to get the engine going and that involves a fuel switch over mechanism as well as a fuel heater to heat the grease to a liquid. Sounds like a mess.
There's good information available from the Biodiesel association or something like that.
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http://www.biodiesel.org /
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Cooking oils from your local McDonald's work but have to be filtered before mixing it with #2 diesel. Heating the oil helps get it through the filters and removes nearly all the "impurities" that might cause it to coagulate in very cold weather. Aside from that you don't need to do anything. By the way, it smells like french fries out the exhaust. Neat.
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Yeah, will have to check them gaskets and hoses...
Check out this book, I received it yesterday, has everything about biodiesel and how to setup your own processor
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
cp
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Thanks c.p. but the amount of use my car gets would not warrant the time and effort to make my own. Hopefully the book will hepl those who do want to make it.
jj
PS - On my first, second and third attempts to post this, a message bawled at me that HTML attachments cannot be posted to user groups. I could find no attachment and deleted your response but I still had the message:
"Outlook Express could not post your message. Subject 'Re: Convert 240D to biodiesel', Account: 'news.west.earthlink.net', Server: 'news.west.earthlink.net', Protocol: NNTP, Server Response: '441 Posting Failed (EarthLink does not permit the posting of HTML attachments to Usenet.)', Port: 119, Secure(SSL): No, Server Error: 441, Error Number: 0x800CCCA9"
It's probably telling me I need to get further from MicroCrap.
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for myself, it's about $3000 a year in fuel, for some peanuts, but for me, not yet :-)
cp
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Phew!, that's a lotta dough - $250/month. For that I'd do the same.
JJ
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What about the cost of collecting it and making it suitable for use?
DAS
For direct contact replace nospam with schmetterling
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If I can make the procedure efficient then it's worth it. I set up a supply of around 100L every Friday from a fast "food" joint two blocks away, if I can make the whole operation straightforward I will go ahead with it.
cp
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Guess you could heat your house with this stuff too???? That is more interesting to me personally, since I use a lot more oil and money that way...
Marty
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Not started yet :-)

Yeh, that's what I told my parents, get an oil heater. In some Euro countries this is common
cp
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Maybe only where there isn't piped gas.
DAS
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For direct contact replace nospam with schmetterling
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I hears it's popular in Italy, no?
cp
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Statistically invalid sample: yes, the people we stay with in a house on Lake Garda in northern Italy have oil :-)
However, given the terrain and location I can imagine that laying a pipeline would probably be uneconomical, even if it is only a spur from Verona... not that I know anything about gas pipeline economics...
Dunno if oil is "popular" in Italy, however.
DAS
For direct contact replace nospam with schmetterling
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:-)
Maybe not "popular"... As for pipelines, here in Vancouver at least the oil is delivered, though it does not get cold enough here to bother. If I lived in the east, then I'd fer sure get it done...
cp
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http://www.veggiepower.org.uk /
The cost of collecting waste vegetable oil and cracking it with methanol and lye is thought to be about 70 - 80 cents US per gallon, if the waste oil is free, not counting the cost of energy for heating the reaction chamber. There is also the cost of a pH tester -- strips will do, and the cost of some lab glassware and the cost of the various containers and large vessels necessary. Here's a starter list for a transesterification cracker:
1 water heater or 55 gallon drum (preferably metal, stainless is great, no rust, glass lined is great with a drain) with a heat source underneath capable of heating 20-30 gallons of oil. Ideally, an oil burner would be great as one could then burn biodiesel to heat the reaction...but propane is good also. Even an electric water heater will do...
1 55 gallon drum, plastic is good, translucent or with a sight line so you can see where the fuel and glycerin have separated
Qty. X methanol or denatured ethanol or if you can manage it, or pure grain alcohol (which is pretty damn hard to get an exception for -- remember moonshine?)
Qty. X lye
Assorted tubing, clear, valves, stoppers, line crimpers, etc.
Qty 1: Aquarium bubbler or other air source (compressor) to make bubbles to wash the fuel after draining the glycerin.
Dori A Schmetterling wrote:

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Yeh, that fryer book goes into detail on how to do this
(Amazon.com product link shortened)573&link_code=as1
Though the chemicals make me kind of wary of this... though a friend (and the rest of his family) work for a used oil recycler, he said the process they use is simpler and the results are the same. Will have to get together with him and trade secrets, I'll let know what I learn :-)
p

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Yeh, it's canadian dough, but it's still a lot here!
cp
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