Diesel Engine Warmup On Cold Days

I live in Western KY, so cold weather comes and goes. The past few days its been below 20 degrees at night so I've been hooking up the good ol' block heater. In the mornings before I head out I let the car
warm up at least 15 mins at higest idle. Generally after this amount of time the temp. gauge reads 40c (104f). When the temp is below 35 degrees my engine NEVER seems to get above 60c (140f) unless I go at a speed above 65mph for a good while. I flushed the radiator in October and filled it with the best antifreeze Autozone had.
Does my engine stay cold because of the massive amount of airtake by disels?
At 60c (140f) the engine is still not warm enough to provide adequate heat for the interior. Below 60c (140f) the air blowing is unbearably cold.
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you need a new thermstat

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Install a new 80 Degree C. Thermostat. Be sure its arrow points UP.
And don't warm up the engine, start it and drive off.
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Why? I just don't understand it, if it's FREEZING cold and my car can't even stay running, it's so sooooo cold, and you can feel how slow and cold your car is, why not warm it up? I'm not flaming, just sincearly wondering. I mean, what's the purpose of engine block heaters, etc? Isn't the hardest time on an engine when it's not warmed up? Here is what Keith A. Marshall said regarding honda bulletbikes, which are ridden a lot harder than a 1980's W123 Diesel...
I have been road racing Hondas for over two decades. Our team, Heschimura Racing, has won three 24 hour races and one 30 hour race. We won the 24 Hours of Nelson's in 1983 on a VF750. Beating all the 1 liter machines in the race on a stock VF. I was sold!
During my career in the motorcycle industry I worked for Honda Research of America, in Torrance CA. We were responsible for testing pre-production units to make sure they would last the life of the warranty and we did emission testing. We rode all models of Hondas for tens of thousands of miles without ever changing any fluids. The only maintenance we were allowed to do related to safety, tires, brakes etc. We tested many V4s that had the poorly designed heads. We NEVER had a failure during all the testing we did. We would put over 30,000 miles on the bike without ever changing the oil! This had to be done to check for compliance with the Federal laws concerning warranties.
A typical day of testing started with a thorough check-over of the machines and topping off any fluids, airing the tires, etc. The machines would then be started and HEATED up to OPERATING temperature before riding. This contributes to extended reliability and will make any engine last ten to twelve times longer. If you only would take one piece of advice to make your bikes last forever, do this one thing! We then proceeded to flog the machines for approximately 350 miles per day. If they can take this without and oil change, for 30,000 miles, think of how long your VFR could last under normal conditions!!!
Keith A. Marshall
Is this guy just a total putz?
size=2>...</FONT></DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>&gt; Install a new 80 Degree C. Thermostat. Be sure its arrow points UP.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; And don't warm up the engine, start it and drive off.<BR>&gt; </FONT></BODY></HTML> ------=
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One man's opinion about Honda motorcycles.
The purpose of engine block heaters is to keep the engine sufficiently warm to start. Once started, one should drive off - not immediately to 80 mph, but normal use for such driving warms the engine faster than some prolonged fast idle without load.
A diesel warms up faster when it's under load so drive it, don't idle it.
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Currently, many race engines are warmed (or heated to operating temp) electrically *before* starting. Your car is different. T.G.'s advice is sound. I would add to drive gently at first when the temperatures are low.
Chas Hurst

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Although I'm not sure of the exact reason, I know idle is bad for the engine. I heard people telling idle will result in lower mpg for a short period (10-15 minutes) immediately after idling.
I always drive off right away, it warms up in less than two minutes drive, faster than my gloves being heated up by mine hands' body heat. Do you have preglow in your car for cold start?
As you may know there is absolutely no point to idle for lubrication purpose on a German car, they all use active lubrication, unlike the rest that use passive lubrication which do need idle even in the summer.
cheers, Ben
face=Arial size=2>...</FONT></DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>&gt; Install a new 80 Degree C. Thermostat. Be sure its arrow points UP.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; And don't warm up the engine, start it and drive off.<BR>&gt; </FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>
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Drive off immediately but gently until the car has reached operating temp (probably 5 mins after dashboard thermometer indicates the right temp).
The reason is to warm the whole car up, otherwise you have a warm engine driving a cold transmission etc, with metal expanding at different rates.
Does that make sense?
DAS
--
For direct contact replace nospam with schmetterling
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On 8 Jan 2004 15:02:16 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@spis.net (mitch knight) wrote:

In the seventies, it was very common in Europe to see most diesel trucks, buses and even diesel taxis with some sort of plastic or fabric "aprons" covering most, if not all the radiator grille. Many had flaps that could be opened at will to let more air in. Nowadays, diesels are even more common than then, but none limit the air intake to the radiator and these aprons are a thing of the past. You should check your thermostat and make sure it is of the correct rating.
Satrt the engine, let the oil warm up and flow well for some seconds, and drive off gently. Do not race the engine, and especially, do not lug it until it is at full operating temperature. Fifteen minutes of idle is throwing away your money, spoiling your engine and polluting the environment.
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So theoretically warming the engine up is a bad idea...
I've already tried the piece of cardboard in front of the radiator trick, with minimal if any sucess.
What does a new thermostat run?
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On 9 Jan 2004 14:54:12 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@spis.net (mitch knight) wrote:

a new gasket and sealing compound. If the rubber hoses are soft or cracked, this is a good moment to replace them. The cost of labor will vary greatly depending on the model of your car and the accessibility of the thermostat housing. In any case, thermostat replacement is -usually- a small and straightforward repair job.
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