Diesel fuel economy device

A few years ago a physicist from Temple University, a Dr Tao, developed a device that electromagnetically reduced the viscosity of diesel fuel. This in turn led to better atomization and better efficiency.
http://www.temple.edu/newsroom/2008_2009/09/stories/taofueldevice.htm
Anyone heard what happened to plans to market it?
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Contact the people shown in the link and report back?
Maybe it does not really work in 'real life'? It weren't for the respectable university I would have thought it was twaddle.
DAS
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The link doesn't even say there were plans to market it. Only that it has been licensed to Save the World Air and that testing is being done using some trucking company. The physics behind it suggest it's possible. Google electrorheology. And the paper was published in a pear reviewed engineering publication. However, since the electric field reducing viscosity is what leads to better atomization and combustion, one can only wonder why no one has simply applied engine heat to the fuel to do the same thing?
I also find it strange that if this can work in practice to achieve meaningful increases in fuel economy that they choose to get involved with Save the World Air. Why not Cummins, MB, etc who would be in excellent position to figure out if it works and can actually be implemented.
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