Diesel purchase question

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On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 14:23:24 GMT, "Bernard Farquart"


The point he was trying to make, I believe, is that any lessening of reliance on foreign fuel is not happening because the fertilizer could be using the same supply of fuel that you're trying to save, your attempt to feel good about burning less imported fuel is a false savings.
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I find it very unlikely that it takes 100 gal of petroleum in fertilizer to make the soy that is processed into 100 gal of Biodiesel.
It would tend to be *less* in fact alot less, so even if you are using the same supplier, you end up using less.
Unless you think the agriculture industry is so inefficient in this country that the amount of oil used is the same.
I actually meet the guy who makes it, so how does he make any money, or the farmer, or the trucker, if it is a zero gain proposition?
I have never understood the resistance people have to the idea that an easy, profitable, low impact way exists to start to wean ourselves off of what must inevitably end someday relatively soon.
Bernard
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so much for the 25+ mpg <american> just for getting a diesel + the face that a good diesel will last 300+k miles per engine saving the cost of down time & cost of 2 motors
hell screw the fry oil, if it was meant to run on the stuff Ronald would be driving it.
300SD 260K <1/2 QT OIL PER 3K MILES>
the case, minus a few cans!
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On 2004-09-01 18:12:00 -0700, "Bernard Farquart"

I have never understood the small mindedness of people that won't look at the whole situation, but want an easy answer.
Like "electric cars" are so great, as long as you don't look at how the electricity is produced. Hydrogen cars are fantastic as long as you don't examine too closely where this hydrogen comes from, and Biodeisel is a panacea as long as you close your mind to the goverment subsidies the deforestation and water usage as well as petroleum derived fertilizers that support it.
That's not to say I think biodeisel is bad, only that it is no great "solution" to our energy problems. it's simply another idea, which has some promise, but must be scrutinised critically and in great detail before we all go bananas for it.
Also, biodeisel is no way "low impact". Think about the cleared land to grow the crops and the water that has to used/moved to make the crops grow, and the fertilizers and pesticides... These are relatively high impact when compared to pumping oil out of the ground.
Sorry to rain on your parade, but ultimately I am afraid that the best real approach we can take to making a difference is conservation, not just a different flavor of fuel.
Marty
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I am talking about a simple way that an individual can *lessen* the amount of cash that goes to oil producing contries and *increase* our energy independace

OK, we are not really deforesting the US for farmland anymore, so that does not apply, we may as well subsidize FUEL production, I think that is a legitimate use of government money, so I don't have a problem with that.We use oil in current fertilizers because that is the cheapest current way to do it, this may continue, or not, but is not in my "circle of control" so I can't act on it.

I think that if more people use it, the "economies of scale" will apply and it will get more efficient in the conversion of energy. But people have to start using it for there to be any interest in investing. So I use my cash to buy the more expensive fuel now, in hopes that this will get the ball rolling.

We already have a great deal of farmland that is being underused, I really can't think of anywhere that we are "clearing land for farmland" in the US kansas is pretty clear at this point. we do have water problems, but I think that is not an insurmountable issue, when compared to continued energy dependance and the costs associated with that (IE the current defense budget)

conservation will just slow the inevitable, it is not an answer, only a delaying tactic. we need a different flavor of fuel or a totally different type of society. I think a new type of fuel is less trouble.
Bernard
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Biodiesel is nice.... but straight vegetable oil is the best... used one which is free... although it does take a bit of work...
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Hi @ all,
wrote:

I lived with a guy who used rape oil for his 190D. He told me he used it a couple of years. The only thing he had to do was cleaning the fuel filter. He also told told me that it made some trouble in winter time. He removed earlier installed special installations for rape oil. He told me, there was no worth for it - just using the diesel engine is the best. But he said, older diesel engines (e.g. the one of W123) might need additional installations (e.g. a preheater).
Right now, there might be a big advantage of using such "fuel"!? BTW, that guy got his rape oil in portions of 50 to 100 litres by a local oil mill.
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DemMan wrote:

Yes, I'm running mine on biodiesel. I have a '79 240D with the engine out of a 300SD, with 4 speed manual tranny. On regular diesel I was getting about 22-24 mpg both city and highway, on biodiesel I'm averaging more like 26-28. That's in U.S. gallons. Biodiesel costs about 10% more than ordinary, and there is only one station in the area selling it, fortunately, only a few miles from my house, but the increase in mileage is worth an extra 10-15 cents a gallon.
Rochelle
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Where are you? Are you talking about B100? It costs $3.00 per gal. here.Or are you talking about B20?
Bernard
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Bernard Farquart wrote:

I'm in Boise, Idaho. I believe it was B20. Unfortunately, when I drove by the station yesterday, they were closed. :( The other "Kicks 66" stations in our area only sell regular diesel. I hope it is not permanent. Ordinary diesel is running about $1.99 - $2.09, and biodiesel about $2.19 or so.
Rochelle
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