Diesel Turbo Charger

Is it possible to attach a 1986 Mercedes 300SDL 3.0L V6 Turborcharger on a 1990 Mercedes 300E 2.6L?
If not, are there any W124 Turbo Chargers for the Mercedes?
Thanks.
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Pierre Vital wrote:

You're proposing to take a turbocharger from an 86 diesel and put it in a 90 gas engine? Good grief! From a practical standpoint, you can't even take a turbo from a diesel and put it on a very similar non-turbo engine, because there are a whole host of issues, like the engine components in the turbos are beefed up to handle the increased stress, diff oil cooling to handle the heat, fuel control systems, tranny shift differences, etc.
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NO NO NO NO and NO.
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Pierre Vital wrote:

I would not recommend putting a diesel turbo on a gasoline engine, even if it delivered the right airflow and pressure (which is extremely doubtful). The reason is that the turbo on the diesel runs quite a bit cooler than the turbo on a gasoline engine. Consequently the steels that work for a diesel may be inadequate for a gasoline engine. This is also the reason that diesel with turbos were developed long before gasoline engines with turbos. The steels that were available in the 1940's could handle diesel exhaust temperatures, but not gasoline exhaust temps. For the most part, improved steels and ceramics made the gasoline engine turbocharger successful in about the 1990's.
I don't know what Mercedes uses for turbo materials, but it would not be uncommon for the diesel turbo rotor to be made of steel, whereas the gasoline one would be made out of a high temperature ceramic.
Most people don't know it but the exhaust temp of diesel engines (the temp into the turbo) is substantially lower for a diesel than a gasoline job. The diesel has a compression ratio of say 20 to 1, whereas the gas job is about 9 to 1. The larger compression ratio also means a longer expansion ratio, and consequently a lower temp when the exhaust valve opens.
HTH, EJ in NJ
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At normal safe states of tuing yes, but when you increase the boost (and consequently add more fuel) your limit is hot the exhaust gets - you have to stop before they glow cherry red. Well before.
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It's not a bolt on and there are ancilliary control systems and internal modifications to the engine.
It's be a major and expensive project to get this to work.
Get a supercharge3d SLK engine from a wreckers instead :-)
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