E Class safest in the USA

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A private U.S. highway safety group has analyzed crash test data and found the vehicle with the safest design is the Mercedes E-Class sedan.
The report by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety concluded the most unsafe vehicle is the two-door Chevrolet Blazer, the New York Times said Tuesday.
The institute reached its conclusions about the Mercedes, Blazer and 197 other relatively popular vehicles by studying driver death rates of 1999 to 2002 model cars and trucks from 2000 to 2003.
Among four-door midsize cars, the Volkswagen Passat performed best, with an average of 16 driver deaths per million registered vehicles annually, but the Chrysler Sebring had 126 driver deaths.
Among midsize sport utility vehicles with four-wheel drive, the Toyota 4Runner had 12 deaths per million registered vehicles annually, compared with 134 for the two-door Ford Explorer.
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On 2005-03-15 10:40:06 -0800, "greek_philosophizer"

So I guess this really isn't about vehicle safety per se. The death rate would also reflect the habits of the drivers of vehicles. People who own a new e class are probably older in general and thus have learned that it is bad to bump into things...
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Martin Joseph wrote:

Yes, and keep in mind that that's how insurance rates for a particular vehicle are determined. It's why the insurance on a $20K Mitsubishi Eclipse is more than on a $60K E500,
--

- RODNEY


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Martin Joseph wrote:

How do safety tests take account vehicle weight?
If a 1500 kg Mercedes E sedan does hit some 1000 kg japanese tiny car it is quite different from testing both cars by driving them to a concrete wall.
Reg: Harri
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The US Insurance Institute for Highway Safety tests cars in typical and worst-case collision scenarios. I believe they were one of the first organizations to rate cars with offset crashes (reflecting real-world collisions). They also have upgraded their side-impact tests to reflect how well cars withstand side impacts from large SUVs. Vehicles that handily passed the previous tests designed to simulate impacts from other passenger cars no longer did so well in the revised test.
Typical midsized SUVs mass close to 2000kg and large ones can mass 3000kg.
--Paul ** Note "removemunged" in email address and remove to reply. **
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Some years ago I saw a lab crash-test report with seven or eight similarly-sized cars tested, including BMW 520, Merc 200 and Volvo. BMW and Merc were about equal (can't remember which came tops), followed by Volvo. The Opel/GM and Japanese cars came way lower.
However, the results were, of course, specific to the models tested and have little bearing on current cars. Merc still scores well in lab crash tests. Don't know about 'real-world' performance.
We're talking injury to occupants here, not cost of repair/replacement, which is what the insurance companies need to know.
DAS
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