Engine rebuild

Hi everybody, Iím new here and look forward to getting to know you all and pick your brains!! :lol: Iím rebuilding a 78 Mercedes 300D engine and have spent
a lot of time on the internet trying to find a complete engine and camshaft/valve rebuild kit, but havenít come up with much! :evil: Could anyone direct me to a web site that might be helpful :?: Thanks, bloeff :!:
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Hi everybody! :D
My search has led me to a local machine shop that comes highly recommended. I gave them a call and they have access to a company that can provide me with all the kits I need. :P My :evil: days in this phase of the rebuild seem to be over!! I look forward to hearing from anybody that has any advise to give me. This is my first rebuild!! :roll:
Thanks, bloeff
"bloeff" wrote: > Hi everybody, > I'm new here and look forward to getting to know you all and > pick your brains!! :lol: I'm rebuilding a 78 Mercedes 300D > engine and have spent a lot of time on the internet trying to > find a complete engine and camshaft/valve rebuild kit, but > haven't come up with much! :evil: Could anyone direct me to a > web site that might be helpful :?: > Thanks, > bloeff :!:
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Most off the time, you just need the machine shop to resleeve your engine block... reuse the piston but new rings and have them also rebuild the valvetrain completely... pretty much reusing teh cam if okay, the valves (regrind), reuse springs, but replace everything else.
No need to replace piston as it is super heavy duty. Otherwise, I believe it is the most simple engine to rebuild.
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I have '82 300 TDT w 396,000 miles. I have changed oil every 2000 miles, but am getting blowby and hard cold weather starting.
Do you think I can keep my pistons too? What about the oil pump? Would you replace that?
Paul Tiger wrote:

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At 400,000 miles? Definitely on oil pump... that should be changed whenver you redo engine. As far as piston goes, check the dimension against specification and allowance.
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Thanks Tiger, You may have just saved me a bunch of $$ :
"Tiger" wrote
> At 400,000 miles? Definitely on oil pump... that should be > changed whenver > you redo engine. As far as piston goes, check the dimension > against > specification and allowance.
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Hi everybody,
Let me throw a few things out there and see what you guys think. Iíve spoken to several professionals and they have talked me out of a bore and oversized pistons. Iíll have the machine shop look over all the parts and make recommendations. Would resleeving create longer engine life, even if the cylinders show no appreciable wear? What do you think of hard chrome sleeves? Some mechanics have told me that a properly reconditioned valve will actually outlast a new valve? Is this true, or is it self-serving? If its true, then Iíll get a valve job. If not, then Iíll rebuild the head myself with all new parts. Let me know what you think. In either case, if the head is rebuilt first, what is its "shelf life" and how should I store it? What about the block and the rest of the car? The car is sitting under my car port. The previous owner did an amateur restoration. Iíve owned the car for more than a year and there are no visible signs of rust. Do you recommend a car cover?
Thanks,
bloef
"bloeff" wrote
> Thanks Tiger1, > You may have just saved me a bunch of $$ :P
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First of all... engine sleave is a wear item... over long time the bore will turn from perfect circle into oval shape. This is because the way crankshaft and combustion forces on the connecting rod... tilting it one way or the other. This is primary reason of losing compression.
By pressing old sleeving out and put a new one in, you are bringing it back to factory new spec. Perfect circle and thickness of the sleeve. By overboring it, you create thinner sleeve and weaker... which will not be stable for high compression diesel engine... thus engine will break down sooner... much sooner as this diesel engine runs very hot. There is always appreciable wear on diesel engine unless your compression is still high... but unlikely.
The valve, the machine shop is also correct. Because of continuous opening and closing, the valve seat wears out ir cokes thus also creating poor seal. So even if you put in a new valve, the seat does not match the new valves and will wear out new valve faster.
Let the machine shop do both for you and the engine will be just like new. They will measure the heck out of everything and make sure they are within factory specs. As far as the camshaft, I'd suggest you let them measure them for you also... you will need new valve lifters to match new cams. If you do plan to reuse old cam and lifters, make sure you mark them accordingly... each one is worn and seated to certain direction and if put in different lobe... will wear out that lobe faster than normal.
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Thanks Tiger,
Great advise! Iíll keep you updated on my progress.
Bruce L
"Tiger" wrote
> First of all... engine sleave is a wear item... over long time > the bore will > turn from perfect circle into oval shape. This is because the > way crankshaft > and combustion forces on the connecting rod... tilting it one > way or the > other. This is primary reason of losing compression. > > By pressing old sleeving out and put a new one in, you are > bringing it back > to factory new spec. Perfect circle and thickness of the > sleeve. By > overboring it, you create thinner sleeve and weaker... which > will not be > stable for high compression diesel engine... thus engine will > break down > sooner... much sooner as this diesel engine runs very hot. > There is always > appreciable wear on diesel engine unless your compression is > still high... > but unlikely. > > The valve, the machine shop is also correct. Because of > continuous opening > and closing, the valve seat wears out ir cokes thus also > creating poor seal. > So even if you put in a new valve, the seat does not match the > new valves > and will wear out new valve faster. > > Let the machine shop do both for you and the engine will be > just like new. > They will measure the heck out of everything and make sure > they are within > factory specs. As far as the camshaft, I'd suggest you let > them measure > them for you also... you will need new valve lifters to match > new cams. If > you do plan to reuse old cam and lifters, make sure you mark > them > accordingly... each one is worn and seated to certain > direction and if put > in different lobe... will wear out that lobe faster than > normal.
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www.performanceproducts4benz.com sells kits, parts also see http://www.mercedesengines.net /
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