freeze plug removal 300e

after redoing my waterpump pressure appears to have increased and now I notice that I've got a little leak out of one of my freeze plugs just below
the exhaust manifold. Dealer didn't want to believe it saying theyve never come across this before and insisted at first that it's a head gasket leak. Well, I hope I'm lucky since it is indeed the freeze plug. How to remove this do I just hammer in a big screwdriver and twist it out?? or might there be threads for screwing in a heating element. The car is a 1989 300e. any help much appreciated. If it just pops out with a screwdriver, I imagine it the plug will also need some kind of sealer... silicon rubber OK?
cheers, guenter
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Is the cylinder head aluminum or cast iron? (Pray that it's cast iron.)
Core plugs, a/k/a freeze out plugs, are pressed into their cavity.
I suggest you be very cautious and circumspect about this job for it will be difficult in any instance and the only reward is to cure a very small coolant leak that's NOT going to "blow out" catastrophically anytime soon. I would first understand exactly what's involved in installing the replacement plug before even touching the leaking one. It may be better to add some "stop leak" to the cooling system and just drive it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2006-03-10 20:53:06 -0800, "T.G. Lambach"

I agree completely.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Martin Joseph wrote:

I wish I could be this optimistic. One nice afternoon, driving a 13-year old car between Denton and Dallas, TX, I had a core plug let go with no warning.
I think the question the car owner needs to ask himself is, "Do I feel lucky?"
BTW, the reliability of replacement core plugs should be as good as the originals, if done properly. Instead of being pressed into place, they are expanded by flattening a dome.
--
St. John

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Guenter Scholz wrote:

lip (without harming the block) until you manage to bend it inwards a bit, relieving some pressure. Then, tap on the bottom of the plug closer to where you bent the lip so the plug rotates: the side you are tapping should go in a bit. The side that is being raised, you can then grab it (vice grips/whatever) and yank it out. Clean the hole on the block, inspect the inside, then put a new plug in place. BTW, I only use brass plugs instead of factory ones. I am that crazy. In any case, you need to find a socket/pipe that would fit inside the new plug almost snug (if it is truly snug it can become very exciting quickly). You will tap the socket to press the new plug into place.
It is not hard but you need room around the plug
--
Mauricio raub-kudria-com
(if you need to email me, use this address =)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.