HOW2 re-attach wooden trim strips on dash of 240D ?

The wooden strips along the mid-front of the dash, horizontally mounted on the glove compartment, etc., have come loose.
How can they be, hopefully, simply/cheaply, reattached for a long time.
They remained attached about 20 yrs. this time. I'd prefer not screwing them back on.
Thank you.
Courtney
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s/v Mutiny
Rhodes Bounty II
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in a large bowl, then mix each of the other ingredients. Make balls about the size of a baby?s fist (there should be one lying around for reference). Bake at 400°for about 25 minutes - or you could fry them in olive oil. Place the meatballs in the tomato gravy, and simmer for several hours. Serve on spaghetti. Accompany with green salad, garlic bread and red wine.
Newborn Parmesan
This classic Sicilian cuisine can easily be turned into Eggplant Parmesan If you are planning a vegetarian meal. Or you could just as well use veal - after all, you have to be careful - Sicilians are touchy about their young family members...
6 newborn or veal cutlets Tomato gravy (see index) 4 cups mozzarella, 1cup parmesan, 1cup romano Seasoned bread crumbs mixed with parmesan romano salt pepper oregano garlic powder chopped parsley Flour eggwash (eggs and milk) Peanut oil for frying.
Pound the cutlets. Dredge in flour, eggs, then the bread crumb mixture. Fry till golden brown in 350° peanut oil. In a baking pan, place a layer of gravy, then one of meat, gravy, and cheese. Another layer each of meat, gravy, and cheese. Then bake at 350° for 45 minutes. Serve on hot pasta with romano cheese.
Southern Fried Small-fry
Tastes like fried chicken, which works just as well. In fact you may want to practice cutting up whole chickens for frying before you go for the real thing. Whole chicken is much more efficient and inexpensive than buying pieces.
1 tiny human, cut into pieces 2 cups flour Onion, garlic Salt pepper garlic powder cayenne pepper hot sauce, etc. Oil for frying
Mix milk,
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horror: a small miracle stopped short by a drunk driver, or the innocent victim of a drive-by shooting...
2 cups finely chopped very young human flesh 1 cup shredded cabbage 1 cup bean sprouts 5 sprigs green onion, finely chopped 5 cloves minced garlic 4-6 ounces bamboo shoots Sherry chicken broth oil for deep frying (1 gallon) Salt pepper soy & teriyaki minced ginger, etc. 1 tablespoon cornstarch dissolved in a little cold water 1 egg beaten
Make the stuffing: Marinate the flesh in a mixture of soy and teriyaki sauces then stir fry in hot oil for till brown - about 1 minute, remove. Stir-fry the vegetables. Put the meat back into the wok and adjust the seasoning. De-glaze with sherry, cooking off the alcohol. Add broth (optional) cook a few more minutes. Add the cornstarch, cook a few minutes till thick, then place the stuffing into a colander and cool; 2 hours Wrap the rolls: Place 3 tablespoons of stuffing in the wrap, roll tightly - corner nearest you first, fold 2 side corners in, wrap till remaining corner is left. Brush with egg, seal, and allow to sit on the seal for a few minutes. Fry the rolls: 325° if using egg roll wraps, 350° for spring roll wraps. Deep fry in peanut oil till crispy golden brown, drain on paper towels.
Lemon Neonate
Turkey serves just as well, and in fact even looks a bit like a well-dressed baby. By the time you turn the child?s breast into cutlets, it will be indistinguishable. The taste of young human, although similar to turkey (and chicken) often can be wildly different depending upon what he or she has consumed during its 10 to 14 months of life...
4 well chosen cutlets (from the breasts of 2 healthy neonates) 2 large lemons (fresh lemons always, if poss
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GE Silicone II Chaulk/Glue... clear. Tape it well and let dry.
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on mine i removed the metal backing from the dash, took them inside, glued the wood back to the backing.on mine the wood was really bowed from being loose for so long, so i taped it to a 2by4 like a splint untill the glue dried. just be careful and not glue the tape to the wood or the backing to the splint if you use one. and use a good adhesive.
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Good advice, except what glue did you use?
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on the 240d i used a product called THE WELDER, a silicone adhesive, but that was several years ago and i can no longer find it in the stores, i glued some pieces back on the volvo the other day, i used a silicone adhesive called GOOP and it is holding really well. mark
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Okay, I found what I think is one of the better solutions. I used an adhesive called "Gorilla Glue". It takes overnight to dry but has a resilent nature when cured. On the glove box I put a strip of blue painter's masking tape across the door as close as possible to the wood trim, top and bottom, without getting it under the wood strip where it had come loose. I also put some tape on the wood strip itself. I then forced the glue under the wood strip and pressed it tight against the door to squeeze out any excess onto the masking tape, which I simply wiped off with a paper towel. I then placed a piece of wood about 1-inch wide with about 1/2-inch of soft foam on it across the front of the wood molding and another across the inside of the door. I then clamped both ends and let it sit overnight. The next day I removed the clamps and "splint", carefully ran a razor knife along the top and bottom of the wood trim before removing the masking tape. The Gorilla glue holds like crazy. I haven't had to do that to the other trim on the dash but would probably do it in a similar manner but would lay a piece of plywood across the back of the front seat and use a stick between that and the same "splint" with foam to keep pressure on the trim until the glue could set. I'm sure there are probably simpler solutions but then I've never been know to take the simpler route although most of my repairs tend to be rather permanent. Good Luck!
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