MAYBACH test drive...

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Finally got time to write something that needs a bit of thought.
You got about two hours to drive the car, I think I had it for three hours or so. I did not feel the time at all. Its very comfortable, never a felt bumps on
the road, its silky ride is highly memorable; its least fatiguing... time flies in the car. It accelerates vigorously yet with the civility of a luxury automobile; no head snapping, yet you feel the pull, very strong like an aircraft about to be airborne.
During this massive acceleration, you can change lanes, overtake and get back to your original track--its truly a beautiful experience--its composure stays calm during all this. Speedometer reads 120 mph within few seconds during that maneuver, do not feel the speed at all. It felt like 70 mph or so ... except you begin to feel the cars in the front, traveling in your direction, suddenly speeding toward you. It can be a bit scary. The breaks are very powerful: In no time you are following the traffic! Only thought that goes through your mind at the end of this few seconds is, this is good, I want one! Though, I felt the steering wheel could be a bit tighter, sport mode or otherwise, it was a bit too free wheeling or may be I am used to tighter... I am not suggesting we go back to manual steering ... far from it.
The 57 Maybach, as big as it looks, its a nimble car. Its butter smooth and crisp in corners as well as in tight parking lots! I was very surprised. Interior is sweet. Seats, head rest, trims are the worlds best. Its just perfect. Some part of the dashboard uses real leather, but treated to look like suede. It makes for great look, but it shows finger marks too easily and that doesn't look good. I am sure you could lint-free cloth or something and wipe it down in on uniform direction and it would look super. I think such would be great on the 63 Maybach as its a driver-driven car, you sit at the back and enjoy the view.
The 600 some HP engine is well mated and felt precise. Though, it is typical of the SOHC of Mercedes of today. Somewhat tinny, light weight feeling and not so refined, reminds me of it as a "lease" car feeling. While the past SL600 or the S600 engine has a sense of weight and "command" is clearly absent. Paint job is first class, the one I tested was gray on silver dual tone. Its very classy, I loved it.
Unfortunately, the front grill is trendy than classy, it looks like they looked for inspiration form the International truck grill. I wish they designed a grill for the next 100 years. Head lights are nice, again, I would set the industrial design of the head lights to something of a classic shape "beaming with power." Its the eyes of the machine. May be Maybach should call me in to consult on overall theme/design or the ID of the car.
On U-turns or extreme sharp corners I couldn't break its back loose to swing the back to reposition the car. May be I should try it again, but there was something strange: On a U-turn from rest, when I tried to get the back to break away, the car instead tilted, sort of like sitting on its side feeling. My speculation is that the six or seven thousand pounds was thrown off and the self leveling may be doesn't kick in till a certain speed....
It does leave you with a somewhat mixed feeling of spending U$350,000 or so on it. I am still thinking. I need something, that final oomps, to just walk in there and buy one. Oh well...
Overall, it is a fine, ultra classy automobile.
Regards, Jayanthan (Jay) Bala. P.S. In the future please use: [ snipped-for-privacy@hitpix.net]
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Chauffeur-driven, dear Jay, chauffeur-driven...
More seriously, other than some of the detail, I would have thought you get just about most of this on an S-Class (even bearing your specific comment in mind).
I have a far lesser car (a 'mere' CLK), but with its relatively 'tiny' 218 hp 3.2 l engine I still get to 100+ mph in a frighteningly short time. The noise inside the cabin is somewhat higher, especially as it's a rag-top cabrio, but I accept that. The feel is of quality even there, and the ride is fine.
You have given the Maybach a lot of merit points, very nice, but are they worth the USD 200 000 plus over the top S-Class? (Other than the exclusivity/rarity/look-I'm-rich aspect.)
As I suggested in another, similar thread, admittedly without driving a Maybach, a top S and an SL together are a better, more economical proposition than a Maybach.
DAS
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IMHO the Maybach 57 does not make any sense. Compared to a S 600L, this car does not handle better, offer more space for the driver, deliver more performance. It is more expensive (and in my opinion: it looks less good).
Okay, so we take the Maybach 62 and a chauffeur. This car features without a doubt more luxury for the rear passengers than any other Mercedes product. Having sit in one, I felt like in a business jet: Much space for the legs, some space for the head, but overall not enough space to move my body like in a Jumbo Jet. Who needs such a car? I think, the Maybach 62 would be an interesting option for those who usually use a Learjet for their transportation. If I were a manager who had to travel between Munich and Stuttgart very often, I would seriously consider a Maybach instead of a Lear Jet, because it saves time and lets me work/sleep/watch tv without disturbing me. So the Maybach 62 is the business jet for distances shorter than 200 miles. For all other transportation desires (including representation/boasting about one's wealth) there are other, better suitable cars.
And if you think of a Maybach as a business jet without wings, you can see its total cost of ownership from a different view.
Frank
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"So the Maybach 62 is the business jet for distances shorter than 200 miles."
Hmmm . . . suppose there will be Fractonal Ownership programs for Maybachs?!!
Pete Cowper (1987 300E)
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Can I be your London franchisee?
DAS
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<< Chauffeur-driven, dear Jay, chauffeur-driven... >><BR><BR>
ummm... too French :-)
Like the Maybach grill, for the moment its politically correct not to use French words. I am sure it will change fast, just like the trendy Maybach grill, and unlike Rolls...
Regards, Jayanthan (Jay) Bala. P.S. In the future please use: [ snipped-for-privacy@hitpix.net]
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So the summary is that the small Maybach is like the current miniS - too small. The big Maybach is also really too small, but the back seat space is a bit bigger and can sub for a small, mildly uncomfortable private jet. Seems like ole Jerkin Shrimp has done it again!
mcbrue under the bridge in the trailer down by the river
96 S420
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What, not
...cramped under the bridge... ?
DAS
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Sorry...
...crampedly under the bridge...
:-) DAS
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Not where I am, it's not. Nous pouvons parler Francais toujours...
...and we don't have any of that freedom fries nonsense...and, in any case, in Britain we call them chips. In Germany they call them Pommes, pronounced in two distinct syllables (pom-ess). They don't normally bother with the "frites" bit.
Why the Americans call them French fries beats me...Not even the Franch call them "Frites Francaises".
DAS
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Well, of course not. It'd be redundant, kind of like dialing the area code when calling one's next-door neighbor.
Geoff
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religion, one cannot understand the Left." -- Dennis Prager
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We have to do that here. Pretty ridiculious, IMO
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Yep, here too. As of the last year or so, all calls in NYC, even within area codes, require you to dial the code.
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Yes, I noticed that change during a visit in 2003 (or was it 2002?).
In the UK it became possible to dial the area code when dialling locally (previously the call would not go through).
On mobile phones (at least outside NA) you always have to dial the 'area' code (a network or system access code, in fact) and you can always dial the country code.
DAS
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Would seem a bit wierd if they call them pomme in Germany since pomme is French. Pomme de terre is French for "apple of the ground"...or potatoe. This whole thing about not calling them "French fries" here in the US is a backlash against the French for their back-stabbling, under-the-table deals with Saddam in the UN Oil for Food Program. They, along with the Germans and Russians, were caught red-handed with their hand in the money barrel so Americans decided to retaliate. Besides, California wines are not only better but much less expensive than the French stuff. I even prefer German wines to French, especially the white wines from the Rhine Valley. Ta..da!

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Germans have not developed a genuine word for Pommes frites (fried potato sticks), they use the original french name. If you look into a menu in a german restaurant you will find exact these words for it. "Pommes" or "Fritten" are simple synonyms for the original french word, which usually are used only in spoken language. The direct translation of "Pomes frites" is "Bratkartoffeln", but this word describes a different kind of meal: Sliced potatoes with herbs and pieces of onion, fried in a pan (not swimming in a pot of boiling oil).
It seems that your knowledge about german culture is as low as your knowledge about the Iraq war backgrounds. I suggest the following:
1. get yourself a real name 2. avoid mentioning this issue in a newsgroup where it does not belong to
Frank
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haute in die Tasten:

"Does not belong to"??? Ending a sentence in a preposition??? Tsk tsk. Shows your level of intel..... Get rid of that stupid fly...SWAT!

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I suggest you refrain from silly remarks about people's linguistic abilities until such time as you speak German or French or... as well as Frank or others speak English.
Furthermore, we are quite aware of the backgound for the "freedom fries" nonsense in the US. Pathetic, isn't it? Just because a few people in the US disagree with French government's policies you blame the language...
Whether you think Californian wines are better than French wines is fine. Enjoy your boycott of the products of the world's greatest wine industry.
DAS
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Good example. I do not like the current italian prime minister at all. In fact I believe, that he committed several crimes and tries to get away with it by changing the law. But this does not affect my consumption of italian wines of all vintages and brands;-). Funny enough: One of the worst glasses of wine I drank in my whole life was a white californian wine, which I had for dinner in a restaurant in the SF Bay area. Obviously the Californians sell their best wines abroad - the Italians do it just the other way 'round;-)
To come back to the topic: I assume that the Maybach was not primarily made for the domestic german market. In Germany DaimlerChrysler set up only two Maybach showrooms in Germany, one in Berlin, one in Munich. I can very well imagine that Singapore will buy more Maybachs than Germany.
Frank
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Frank Kemper wrote:

I don't have the source at hand but I remember DC saying the main markets are the US and Asia - which makes sense as many wealthy Germans prefer not to show how rich they are.
Juergen
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