New 1984 300SD

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Some Asian imports have plastic lenses instead of glass....even the Bosch yellow boxes are made in Malaysia

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Keep as long as possible, and if eventually need to, spend plenty of time finding the right foreign/classic car painter.
--
Randall Brink
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ALWAYS try to keep original paint.
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said:

I agree. Original Glasomax (sic?) is still the best paint I've ever seen. You would not believe the paint jobs I was able to produce in Germany with this paint in the early '60s. Don't know if those enamels are even available in Germany anymore. In any event here's a trick we used in the fiberglass industry to put a finish polish on molds and I know it works on cars because I've done it. After doing all of the rubbing, polishing, etc., we did a finish polish with baking soda mixed with plain ole water into a paste and used to remove any remaining polishing scratches. There are similar compounds used by really good paint/body shops that can probably do a similar job. In any event I remember one guy in our shop sliding a dry polishing rag from one end to the other of a fairly long "plug" used to make female fiberglass molds. It slid up hill from the stern to the bow with a flick of the hand. Have not seen anything as shiny since with the possible exception of that $500k+ MB McLaren at our local MB dealer last week. I'm too old to do any serious polishing anymore but if I really wanted to have a car polished out right I'd take it to a reputable auto body shop and ask them if they have someone who might be interested in polishing out my car. You might be surprised what they can do in a relatively short time. And I wouldn't worry about going through the paint if it hasn't been polished much in the past. The biggest mistake people usually make is too much polishing and not enough waxing. Polishing removes paint, waxing protects it.
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Spoken like a pro.
So you're saying to take a MB with dull paint to a body shop and have them use polishing compound on it, then wax?
Mia
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That would be my choice since a good rub out takes a lot of work and is normally a 3 or 4 step process. I'd do the wax job myself since that doesn't require nearly as much manual labor as the rub out, and you won't run into the possibility of rubbing through the paint on the convex surfaces such a protruding corners, etc. Body shop personnel who have done this for a while have the tricks down pretty good and avoid rubbing through paint. Can you imagine listening to a painter who has just rolled a new paint job out of the booth and had an underling rub through in a single spot. It can take many hours of repeat labor just to clean up such a spot. They just don't do it or they're looking for another job real quick.
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Glasurit is the paint. I don't think it's the same stuff as it used to be since IIRC it is now water based and used to be alcohol based. Also, it is sadly still produced using a method that is illegal in the US, so you cannot have your car repainted in the US using it. At the same time, I've seen American paint jobs that are amazing, so I think it coms down to just using a good shop.
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The timing chain can be checked for wear at the next valve adjustment. The engine is turned by hand until a mark on the cam aligns with a fixed reference mark - that sets the cam to 00 degrees. Then the crankshaft's angle (scale on the balancer down at the pulleys) is read. The chain is worn and ought to be replaced if the crankshaft angle exceeds 5 degrees. Have it checked so you'll know it OK, or not.
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