Overheating 1995 E220

Have a 1995 E220 (W124) 160 000 km which runs hot (100-110) when driven slowly around the suburbs (putting the baby to sleep stuff) On a long trip at 130km/h it sticks at 80
I've spoken to a couple of other owners who say it should stick at 80 no matter what. Thought of having the radiator (and engine?) flushed. Any suggestions/experience. Thanks in anticipation.
Graham Barr
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
When running hot, does the aux fan come on? Have you been good about the type of water and coolant used in your radiator? Open the cap on the top of the radiator, when cold, and look at the tubes inside--any white deposits? Now with the cap off, start it up and when it's hot see how well the water flows. If it's an anemic flow rate, could be the thermostat.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the reply John. No I haven't been particularly careful about the coolant. Have done regular agency services though. Regarding the auxiliary fan. This remains something of a mystery to me. My reading (Haynes manual) has lead me to believe that the auxiliary fan comes on when the temperature of THE AIR behind the radiator passes some given temperature. The operation of mine follows this rule as when I stop. for example to open my driveway gate, the auxiliary fan almost always goes on but when the car is travelling along (and overheating) it doesn't. I'm sure the operation is entirely logical but I've never really undrstood why it wouldn't come on under a straightforward overheating scenario. Presumeably white deposits indicate less than optimal flow? regards
contextseems to

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Usually the fan temp sensor is in the coolant. But your fan is working so I'd check to see about radiator deposits restricting flow. Radiator shops can do a flow test but that's a last resort for me. Your eyes can tell you what you need to know.

driven
no
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The gas engines typically run warmer under the conditions that you describe - no harm so long as the temp. is below the dreaded red zone. Diesels typically never exceed 80 degrees C except when climbing long hills.
Radiator cleaning is required when the engine runs hot at speed - lots of air flow so that excludes the fans leaving only the thermostat or radiator to blame.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sounds like a fan clutch to me...? Those things only do anything when putting around town. Low airflow and little fan assist... my best guess.
-Mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.