Petrol busts the pound a litre barrier in the UK

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http://r75.sytes.net /
Scroll down a bit.
The said unleaded is standard international 95 octane (cf. c. 91 US).
North Americans be quiet about your prices...
DAS
For direct contact replace nospam with schmetterling
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That's US$7.245 per US gallon by my third grade calculations!
About US$3.30 per US gallon for 91 grade at local (SF Bay Area) station today (diesel about the same price).
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Where in the Bay Area?
http://www.sanfrangasprices.com/ is quite handy. I'm "heypete" on it.
Here in Burlingame, on the Peninsula, diesel's $2.99 at the Eagle Car Wash, though one pump's out of order. Get it while it lasts. That's the same price as their regular gas (87 octane).
Everyone else around here has diesel for about the same as premium, ranging from $3.15-$3.40 depending on where you go.
Now, if only biodiesel were cheaper...
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Pete Stephenson
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wrote:

Most diesel seems to be about $. 30 less than 87 octane in MD.
Tom
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If I send you a bunch of barrels, can you fill them for me and ship 'em back? How much is 87 octane anyway?
(Just kidding, though it'd be nice...)
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wrote:

Roughly $3.15 to $3.35 today - of course it'll change tomorrow! Since I heat with oil, I wonder what that will cost this winter.
Tom
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wrote:

about the same as the diesel
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Here in Vancouver, canola cooking oil is $0.10 cheaper per liter than diesel, filling up in the cooking isle is starting to make sense now.
cp
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wrote:

Brief update from my previous post: I've found a dino-diesel place that's selling for $2.99 USD/gallon. That's relatively good...I'd like to be ~$1/gallon, but it sure beats $3.40.
With straight cooking oil, does it even really need to be filtered, as there's not any residue, right?
I've been looking at doing the vegetable oil thing for a while now, but can't spare the cash to get the second tank and all the work done (and I don't feel comfortable fiddling around with fuel lines to do it myself). Processed biodiesel is available for $3.05/gallon in 55 gallon drums (55 gallon minimum purchase, they'll deliver it right to you) from a place nearby...but with dino-diesel at $2.99, at a pump that's easily accessible...well, it means less hassle for me right now.
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Have you never thought about the stuff in your frying pan? And at McDonald's, you think nothing falls into the vats?
And detergents maybe?
DAS
For direct contact replace nospam with schmetterling
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"Pete Stephenson" <pete+ snipped-for-privacy@heypete.com> wrote in message
news:pete+ snipped-for-privacy@typhoon.sonic.net...
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I was thinking more along the lines of store-bought vegetable oil, not waste vegetable oil.
Obviously the waste stuff would need to be highly filtered.

I was under the impression that vegetable oil and biodiesel have various solvent properties which would negate the need for detergents.
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Unused oil should not be a problem. By detergents I mean teh washing-up liquids that may be added to the waste oil from washing the facilities (should have made that clearer).
DAS
For direct contact replace nospam with schmetterling
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Ah, right. Makes sense now. I thought you meant the fuel-additive detergents.
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That's used oil. It's cheaper to use new oil straight from the supermarket than to buy diesel. In the UK. But this is mainly due to tax.
However, filtering old oil is easy enough. You leave it to settle for a few days. The animal fat floats to the top and the 'bits' to the bottom. So you use the middle. ;-)
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Yeh, it's amazing what crud is left over. I let 16 liters settle and 1/3 of it were solids. What cr@p they feed us.
Heating the oil for an hour or so quickens the process, the whole mess seperates into three parts, water at the bottom, then the gunk, then the clean oil.
cp
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Pete Stephenson wrote:

world here in the UK. Most people simply add anything upto 20% cooking oil to a tank full of normal diesel and aside from an odd smell from the exhaust you don't notice the difference. If you go the separate tank/fuel lines route then you'll likely need some form of fuel heater too as the cooking oil is, I understand, a lot less viscous when cold and can block up the injectors.
A couple of the people I know that are doing this get their oil from the local chip shop (for free) and filter it before adding to their diesel tanks. Result? A car that smells like a chip shop :-)
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Steve G
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I ran my car on straight new canola oil, didn't notice any power loss. Though engine should have good compression for best results.
cp
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Jim
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My last trip was $2.71/gal for premium. I think the local retailers were holding the line on prices given the problems with Katrina recovery. Meanwhile, in Atlanta and untouched, the prices quickly spiked to over $6.00 (still nothing compared to European prices). Go figure.
R / John

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Just keep in my the most of what you are paying is taxes. You may feel that that's worth it, but it is still NOT the price of the gas that is your biggest bite at the pump.
Last I heard, the wholesale price of the gasoline itself is around $2 a gallon.
- GRL

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