R-134 conversion, should I be worried?

My car (1985 380SE) was in an accident a little while ago (I'm sure you all remember). Anyways, as part of the repair they converted my A/C to R-134a.
It was done by Griffin Bros (the body shop outsources the A/C work) and while the guy who did the conversion wasn't around, I'm told they typically replace the valving, tubing, basically any rubber, oil, and freon. It blows real cold for now, but I've heard about conversions gone wrong (I'd have been pissed the shop didn't ask me first, only it didn't work at all before). If it blows real cold (as cold as any new car does, and colder than I remember this car doing when it worked about 7 years ago), does that mean the conversion was done right and I have nothing to worry about? Thanks, Richard
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A/C was dead but works now. What's the problem - it's a 20 year old car! You're looking a "gift horse" in the mouth - and summers just started.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I know, but I just rather not end up with a dead compressor (my problem before was a leak, where the leak was, I don't know). Richard

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My 240D was converted to R-134 at the time of the engine swap(2001). It has been working fine since the swap. Turns me into a happy popsicle in the summer. The only problem that I had was a leak just after the swap. If I remember correctly, it was one of the lines that had not sealed properly, though it has been a few years and I may have that wrong. After that was repaired, and yet another NEW $*%&# condenser, it has worked perfectly. I just wish the mechanic had pressure tested the little beast before he filled it up with the R134. When the system was opened to repair the leak, the I had to replace the condenser, since the mfr. wouldn't warrantee the part otherwise...even though I had just had the first new one put in less than a month before. Grumble, grumble.
Rochelle
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't worry... you'll be okay... zero problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The only real issue I'm aware of is that after the conversion the A/C typically doesn't have the same cooling capacity that it did before. On my 300SD I was warned about that upfront and I definitely notice it on the hottest days. It still does OK, but takes longer to do it's thing when the car is hot than it did before.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
my 88 converted fine. They just changed out the receiver and the o rings and the valve thingys. It blows cold still. KH

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The only thing you should have to change out when converting from R-12 to R-134a is the dryer, and of course the valves. Changing the condensor (that thingy in front of the radiator) or the compressor (if it's working fine) are worthless expenses some people use to relieve you of your extra cash. Perhaps the most critical part of the change over is making sure the system is drawn down with a vacuum pump as much as possible. The system should hold the vacuum for hours without any loss whatsoever. Anything else is indication of a leak. Takes a good A/C guy to track it down with a vacuum. I know an old A/C man who consistently pulled vacuum on his repairs overnight to get as much moisture out of the system as possible. His work was always top notch. I've converted three of my vehicles over to R-134a only because it's easy to buy the 1-lb cans at almost any low-cost auto parts outlet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.