Re: NEVER BUY WALMART'S BATTERIES OR YOU WILL BE SORRY

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writes:


So Bruce will you call me a crook after I doubled the MPG of my Mercedes and Infiniti ? You see, you people like to call every one crook, you made me afraid of dealing with the hassle, that's why I never bother to market my invention. I profit from my idea every day for two years now. America is just too picky, making their complaint when they were not supposed to, and didn't make the proper complaint when they were supposed to.
Tom
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Would this be some latter-day, fuel-injection equivalent of the Fish carburetor?
Yeah, I know: it's a conspiracy of Big Oil. If it weren't for their interference, you'd cure cancer, solve all the world's energy problems, eliminate war, famine and pestilence, and put paid to morning sphincter breath and the Heartbreak Of Psoriasis(tm).
Geoff
-- "If it rains after a liberal washes his car, they say it's a right-wing dirty trick." -- Ann Coulter
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writes:

Oh, how spot on you are Geoff. I get so sick and tired of the liberal's whines and rants about the fault of "Big Oil", "Big Steel", "Big Automotive", "Big Government" (of course, this one only applies when Conservatives are the government. Totally different when it is a givernment of Big Liberals), ad nauseum! I wonder why you never hear them complain and blame "Big Labor", "Big Environmentalism", or "Big Liberalism". I guess the answer lies in their arrogance of they know what is best for us all because they are so much more cognizant, aware, and intelligent than the poor Conservatives (who are all rednecks, hillbillies, farmers, etc.). Got to get off this soap box. Sorry!
DaveD

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: I hardly think a profit motive is unique to those evil corporations. : Geoff

Whoa! I stand edified. Thanks for posting that. It's a hell of an eye-opener.
I haven't been to a Jiffy Lube in several years. What I remember from one of my 3-4 visits was the service writer's trying to convince me to pay for a radiator flush because my car's coolant (which had recently been changed) was "thick." Riiight...
Geoff
-- "If it rains after a liberal washes his car, they say it's a right-wing dirty trick." -- Ann Coulter
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writes:

No doubt that everyone wants to make a profit, but Jiffy Lube in the Los Angeles area takes it to an art form.
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Truckdude wrote:

We had stopped using Jiffy Lube several years ago here in Phoenix because of their predatory tactics and sloppy servicing. Found a dependable place, but that went out of business a couple of months ago. My wife went back to Jiffy Lube because she knew where it was. Got a bill for $115 for an OIL change and some MINOR things they sold her on.
BTW, they checked off that they did all the liquid levels, but low coolant level triggered my car computer less than a week later.
Bah! I am NEVER using them again.
Chip
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Chip wrote:

Based on my experience five years ago with a company vehicle, I wouldn't recommend Jiffy Lube except to customers who know about auto maintenance and can watch the employees continuously.
The two Phoenix area Jiffy Lubes I used, one at Metrocenter, another near the Home Depot on I-17 and Thunderbird, seemed to be honest and didn't push unneeded services, but:
1. The auto maker required 5W-30 oil, but they usually tried to put in 10W-30. A couple of times the Thunderbird Jiffy Lube walked to the Walgreen's next door to purchase 5W-30.
2. The vehicle had ABS that had to be depressurized to for checking the brake fluid level, but both Jiffy Lubes apparently didn't do that and therefore overfilled the reserviors by a great deal and caused tons of fluid to spill out.
3. Both places way overfilled the radiator overflow tank. Granted it was an unusual tank that was supposed to be filled only to 1/2", but I had highlighted the full mark and warned Jiffy Lube of this.
4. The air filter housing was reinstalled wrong.
I had no problems with these places after I told them to only change the engine oil and filter and leave everything else alone.
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On Wed, 17 Oct 2007 13:42:43 -0700, larry moe 'n curly

Back in the days when I was a wage slave, I had my company truck's oil and filter changed at a Penzoil quick-lube place. They checked the transmission fluid level with the engine off and over filled it by about a quart. I didn't know that and the transmission started slipping really bad on shifts after eveything got warmed up. Sucked the extra out and that fixed the problem. I never went back except once when I informed the manager (in front of about 6 customers) of the proper way to check the fluid level in an automatic transmission.
You just can't get good help for minimum wage these days!
Jack
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That's a management failing, not a wage- or employee motivation failing. "Perform to standards, or you're outta here!"
'Course, half the time the managers are retards, too...
Geoff
-- "If it rains after a liberal washes his car, they say it's a right-wing dirty trick." -- Ann Coulter
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Geoff Miller wrote:

No, management failing is when they don't sell enough extras<g>

Too true. Even in the places where you can watch them like a hawk - the only places I would take my cars - you tend to see the manager as the one who's been there more than six weeks, can count without removing his shoes, and manages to NOT need bail money every Monday morning.
Come to think of it Geoff, you probably should issue an apology to retards. Shame on you comparing them with the pit monkeys.<g>
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///snipped drivel///

When I worked at the Sears Auto Center in Fairbanks AK we would take batteries back if (big if) the battery had not been damaged and tested good. I can't vouch for that policy Sears wide and I know that when Sears cut back on the scope of their service and closed some stores that, it seemed to me, that the "bottom line" had gained prieminence over Customer Service. That is why I quit working for them.

True...There are only about three (major) battery manufacturers in the U.S. but the batteries they make are built to the specifications set by each individual retailer. They are not all the same. Nor are they all equal in quality.
DaveD

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Many retailers do not accept returns on electrical items because it is very difficult to determine whether they have been damaged or abused. I suspect that a lot of people buy and install new batteries and then find out it was some other problem.
I would prefer not to shop at any retailer that allows returns on batteries or similar items. The reason is that means the returned items will be put back on the shelf for another unsuspecting customer who ends up with a used item. Anyone who thinks that retailers who allow battery returns is not reselling them to other customers as a new battery is smoking something illegal.
About 20 years ago, Sears had the most liberal return policy of any retailer. Satisfaction guarentted or your money refunded without conditions. I was with a friend of mine when he returned some items he received as a gift about a year before. The items had no tags, no receipt, and it was not even obvious as to whether it was sold by Sears. Sears no longer has such a policy, probably in part because some customers have probably tried to cheat them.

Agreed, they are not necessarily equal in quality, but there is no reason to believe that Wal-Mart's are any worse than anyone else's. Of course most retailers (including Wal-Mart) have more than model, each of different quality (usually differentiated by the warranty). I would bet a lot of money that a Wal-Mart battery is as good or better than any other battery being sold elsewhere at the same price (unless there is a major sale price being offered). But clearly, there are some batteries that cost a lot of money that are probably better than the ones Wal-Mart sells.
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batteries
used
I would think the illegal smoking would come from someone who thinks like that.
According to your statement... You would prefer to buy a new battery, which could possibly be defective from the assembly line, and be stuck with the bill and a defective battery?
Most any large retailer is not going to put something used or damaged back on the shelf, as they simply can Return To Vendor or dispose of the item and get credit.
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DaveD,
I too had been a tech in a Auto-Service Center, Many years ago, before the current restructuring. Even then, we would accept a returned battery, in new condition, if the customer had purchased the wrong type for their vehicle. Many times the customer would guess about the size they needed, even though they were advised and shown what would be the proper fit for their car. Usually, their recollection was the battery was smaller than what they were looking at, only to find out they were wrong, once they got the battery home. Then back they'd come, asking for the proper size or a refund if they ended up getting the battery elsewhere.
As for Sears and the cut backs, their big goal was the $, and not really customer servcie. All too often, a customer would bring in a battery because it'd be giving them a problem. We were required to fill the electrolite to the proper level if it was low, then check the voltage and load test the battery, if the voltage was with a specific range. But if the voltage was too low, we'd have to give the customer a temporary loaner battery and put their battery on a slow charger for 3 days. In most cases, the customer would return, only to be told their battery was no good and they'd need to replace it. Maybe Sears figured that if the customer couldn't or wouldn't wait the 3 days, they'd just buy a new battery. Anyway, I didn't care for the policy because I felt for the customer. The time and inconvience it took (4 days) just to replace a battery you've already checked out to be bad. Personally, I preferred killing a cell in the battery to make it a done deal and get a replacement right away.
Point of note: while at Sears, heads looked the other way when certain service advisors sold things that weren't needed and made big bucks on commissions from the sales. The honest service advisors and whench turners got screwed when they kept adjusting the "incentive" bonus amounts. It initally started out as a reward for working hard , but when upper management saw what everyone was earning, they restructured everything the following year. Long story short, the harder the you worked, the more you got screwed.
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And the 3 companies are JCI, Exide, and Delphi. JCI stands for Johnson Controls Inc. and they make Interstate and Optima plus many others.
Exide sells batteries under its own name and the Wal-Mart batteries where I live say distributed by Exide technologies on them. They also have their own version of the Optima spiral cell battery called the Exide Select Orbital.
Delphi makes the AC Delco Freedom batteries along with the clones that have a flat top with the "Delco Eye" and a flat oval vent hose port at either end of the top.
I know this isn't a very long list but a simple google search can tell you the rest.
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Well, I have read through this and may have missed something but I just comment on Interstate Batteries. We sell Interstate in our shop and many other places do also. There is a toll free number on the top of the battery you can call and they will tell you the closes dealer that sells Interstate Batterys. They are everywhere in the US and maybe other countries also that will warranty the battery as long as the date purchased is punched out on the top of the battery or you have a receipt showing when it was installed. If there is a problem, call Interstate at the toll free number and the problem will be taken care of. I have refunded (this does require a sales receipt) the purchase price when the battery went dead because of a no charge condition and the customer had to buy another battery to get home. I didn't sell the first battery, the second battery or get to fix the charging system but still refunded the money for the Interstate battery and Interstate took care of it. Could anyone want a better warranty this this. Paul Paul's Auto Electric

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Somewhat unrelated: A friend of mine recently bought what he described as a "refurbished" Interstate battery, directly from a facility run by the manufacturer here (Rochester NY). He chose to try one in a non-critical application - his lawn tractor. The battery cost him about half the retail price. As he described it, these are batteries that have sat around dealers' showrooms past their "freshness date". Interesting resource.
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Tom wrote:

I'm not sure why anyone would buy something at Wal-Mart and then expect it to be anything other than worthless, quite frankly.
-tom!
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I returned one to Canadian Tire once. It took a bit of convincing the manager but I did do it.
The thing was faulty and I ened up buying an Optima from - ironically, Wal Mart while on the road. Given I'd returned a faulty charger the week before I think they were just sick of me and just wanted me out of the store :-)
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What a pile of technical dribble. (I'm an electrical engineer)
However WalMart is not my choice of store for anything. Just a bottom end store that trys to undercut other stores. The continually beat their suppliers down to lower prices, regardless of the lack of quality that results.
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