rear springs

I have a 1983 300SD, and I need to replace the rear springs. I have replaced the springs on my old Dodge, and I was wondering if it was the same procedure,
and if it was as easy?
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You need internal spring compressor to change it out. Do not use anything else. You can rent the right tool feom PerformanceProducts.com... this make job easier and safer.
The american style internal spring compressor is okay... it is just too long and need a good spacer.. pipe spacer or bunch of washers.
I did it on 84 W126. Changed it to Eibach. I had the rental tool but it failed on my on the third spring... which is the back springs... Then I had to buy an american style to do the last one in front.
Why do you have to change the spring? I know it is old and probably sagged... but if you got excessive sag, you probably got a collapsed subframe bushings.
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Really? Is that easy to change, because that is what has happened
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Easy you say? Ha!... For the rear springs, you also have to take out the shock absorbers... and to do that, you also have to take out the rear seats to get to the top of the shocks... and then again... you gotta handle the spring like a bomb ticking to go off...
If I were you, I'd get a service manual to know all the informations on procedures... At the same time, I would want to do a complete job so that would means the rear subframe bushings... This part I never done so I can't tell you much about it. I just know from other who said it was subframe bushing and once repaired, the ride height returned to normal.
I changed my springs because I want to lower the car due to my low profile tires. I also want sport suspension. It was perfect.
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I bought coil springs for the rear of my 1982 300 TDT when it had about 225,000 miles on it. I do nearly all my own work, but coil springs are dangerous and the Benz compressor is $600. So I took it to the dealer and had a mechanic I knew and trusted put in the new springs. He did not mention the bushings, but I think he replaced them. That was ten years ago, but I think I remember the bushings being on the invoice. The labor plus parts other than the springs was about $400. My mechanic measured the distance from the ground to the wheel well opening on the rear fender after draining the hydraulic fluid from the load levelers with the old springs in the car and then again after the new springs were in and he said the new springs raised the car about 1 inch.
I recently had new coils put on the front, this time at a bigger Mercedes dealership where I did not know the mechanic. The labor was about $400 for the front springs too. I also had all new bushings installed on the control arms etc.
I didn't notice much difference in handling when the rear springs were replaced, but having new front coils put on when the car had about 375,000 miles made a big difference in the way the car handles and rides. I am starting to think that it may be time to do the rear springs again. I don't want to have my load leveler hydraulic struts start leaking because they are getting over stressed because the springs are weak.
I would be very hesitant to try and replace the springs on a Mercedes without the proper compressor.
I have a Toyota Corolla and I have removed the Macpherson strut coils from it before, but you do that job on a bench after you remove the struts from the car. The Mercedes is different because you have to have a compressor that will fit in the space where the spring is when installed.
I have a new set of coils for my Corolla standing on my workbench right now. To change the rear springs on the Corolla you just disconnect the shocks and the torsion bar and drop the rear axle until the springs fall out and then put the new ones in place and jack the axle back up with a jack under the differential. You don't even need a compressor.
Does anyone have an opinion about how many miles coils last?

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I would say they last about 100,000 miles before they sag too much but then again. Most driver wouldn't notice anything until they change the springs. When I did mine at about 187,000 miles with new Eibach as I want to lower them... It was a world of difference. No sway at all. Car track around corner with so much ease.
As for the spring compressor tool, they can be obtained for $200 now... and rent them for like $40 for as long as you need them... but less than 1 month.
Yes, as I did that spring job myself... yes it is a dangerous job with that super powerful MB spring. This is not for novice DIY... good home mechanic can do the job with all proper precaution.
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