reinstalling timing chain

After replacing cylinder head, I am trying to reinstall the (single) camshaft and timing chain back onto my 1984 190e Mercedes Benz. I'm having trouble fitting the sprocket(camshaft timing gear) and the chain
together. A tight fit, and I don't want to stress the chain or bind up anything.
The Mercedes Benz CD isn't very detailed on this procedure, the Haynes manual and an old Motor imported manual hasn't helped either.
What's the trick of reinstalling the timing chain and camshaft on the motor? A new timing chain requires adding a connecting link on the chain, but I want to reuse my old chain. Do I have to grind off and add any links to reinstall the original chain to the camshaft?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
all that work and your going to use an old chain?
kind of like changing the oil filter & not the oil.
the case, minus a few cans!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
R&Ring the cylinder head for a new head gasket was the biggie. A retrofit for a new timing chain can be done without pulling out the head again. That's on the "things to do list". I think I can slid by with this old chain for a while longer. Which is probably why Mercedes didn't go for timing belts when the rest of the auto industry was dropping the metal chains in favor of the belt, correct me if I am wrong, but a chain is stronger than a belt in the long run.
Karl -- thanks a mill for the pointer!
IF YOU CAN'T SWIM DON'T JUMP IN wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Re: reinstalling timing chain i have heard war stories on some motors that the chains & or the guides break and your left with a hand full of bent valves
case
R&Ring the cylinder head for a new head gasket was the biggie. A retrofit for a new timing chain can be done without pulling out the head again. That's on the "things to do list". I think I can slid by with this old chain for a while longer. Which is probably why Mercedes didn't go for timing belts when the rest of the auto industry was dropping the metal chains in favor of the belt, correct me if I am wrong, but a chain is stronger than a belt in the long run. Karl -- thanks a mill for the pointer!
IF YOU CAN'T SWIM DON'T JUMP IN wrote: all that work and your going to use an old chain? kind of like changing the oil filter & not the oil.
the case, minus a few cans!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Replace the chain now. Breakage ain't the only thing you have to worry about...they also STRETCH. Why open it all back up again? The chain is cheap...the time's gotta be worth more.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The chain tensioner ratcheted out when you took the chain loose. You have to remove the tensioner then put the chain and cam gear on. Take the tensioner and put the large hex section in a vise. Unscrew the center of the hex....it is spring loaded. Remove the center piece and spring. Push the plunger all the way out the bottom [if the spring has not already done this]. Screw the hex section into the timing cover. Push the plunger in. Put the spring in. Screw the center plug back in. The spring will ratchet the plunger out to the chain. Oil pressure will set it correctly.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.