Smart Cabrio on ebay motors...

Page 1 of 4  
Hello,
How is this possible for the non-federalised Smart Cabrio to be registered with Ohio numberplates and titles? This is the second Smart to be posted in the ebay motors for bidding in the past year.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&categoryc15&item $72055508&rd=1
The owner didn't specify whether it was registered with DOT as special interest (historical and technical) category.
A yellow Smart Car with Middle Eastern numberplates and temporary Colorado transfer numberplate was often seen in Denver area. That car was also posted in the ebay motors and sold for $18.500,— or so.
I suppose there is also strong interest or demand for those Smart cars as the bidding history and amount in both Smart cars reflect...
Regards, Oliver
PS I also came across the 1998 Mercedes-Benz Vito with Georgia numberplates in ebay motors, too.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 13 Apr 2004, Ennui Society wrote:

Perhaps the same way as the (old-style) non-federalised '99 Mini I saw with current California regular plates in San Francisco in 2000. I talked to the owner about it, asked what year it was. Without a moment's hesitation he said "It's a '67". I gave him a look that said "Not...". He chuckled and said "Well...OK, *part* of it is a 1967...heheh...it's titled as a '67...". Translation, VIN-swap. Same way the Mexican-market post-'79 VW Beetles made their way up here. Sometimes it works, but boy, talk about Federal penalties stacked on top of Federal penalties if you get caught! There's False Declaration to Customs (a felony), Smuggling, lying on your DOT form, lying on your EPA form...

Probably not...there was a guy who was interested in trying to import and sell Smarts in the US. He went ten or twelve rounds with NHTSA on it, and did so in such a way that he pissed off NHTSA and they said "No". He even tried stupid crap like claiming to want to import them for "show and display". He'd already tipped his hand to NHTSA, and they said "No". So it's unlikely they'd've let someone else do it. Also remember that special-interest vehicles aren't allowed in and onto the roads just because they're special. They're allowed in -- if NHTSA gives permission -- on a limited basis or for bona fide show/display. They've ruled that this basically means car shows and museums. A car dealer wanted to bring in a non-US-spec European vehicle, I forget the make, for permanent display in his showroom; NHTSA said "No, that doesn't count". So they really are quite strict about it.

I'm betting the buyer got a very nasty surprise when he tried to transfer the registration. An increasing number of states run the VIN of all registration requests through VinEDIT, which spits out all VINs not originally intended for the US market. Those states then require complete DOT and EPA clearance forms stamped "RELEASED BY CUSTOMS". It's not nearly as easy to get a non-spec car into the US as it was until 1990. Not even *close*.
And yet...it does happen.

And me, I ran across a European-specs Saab 9-5 not long ago in Florida. And a Mexican-specs Chrysler Spirit in Washington State.
So it does happen, one way or another.
DS
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How does that comply with the principle of free trade?
Frank
--
please replace spam-muelleimer with fk-newsgroups for e-mail contact

Time Flies Like An Arrow - Fruit Flies Like A Banana
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The same way that the EU doesn't allow, say, a Dodge Caravan to be imported from the US. (It doesn't have EC headlights like the Chrysler Town & Country.)
Floyd
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
fbloogyudsr wrote:

You are lying: No problem to import such a car into the EU - all you have to do is to change the headlights to ones with an EU approval on them.
So the question is: WHY are you lying?
Juergen
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 17 Apr 2004, Juergen . wrote:

In some countries, you don't even have to do that. There are a LOT of US-spec cars, complete with US headlamps and red rear turn signals, running around Germany. France is much stricter. Those are only two examples.
DS
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you buy a car of any imaginable brand and import it to the EC without modification, you may not be allowed to use it in public traffic, but of course you can buy it, use it on your private property, on non-public race tracks or as a permanent display in your show room. Besides that it is quite simple to convert just about any existing US car to EU regulations and run it in europe. AFAIK the typical costs for that are 1000 - 2000 US$. You may encounter problems with cars like the Saleen S7 or the Vector W 12. They might be expensive to convert due to tire issues.
Frank
--
please replace spam-muelleimer with fk-newsgroups for e-mail contact

Time Flies Like An Arrow - Fruit Flies Like A Banana
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank Kemper wrote:

In no way: It is simply a mechanism to protect the US car industry agianst imports.
Juergen
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not quite. If the car manufacturer can prove that it meets polution and safety standards, they can import their cars. Doing this is very expensive and time consuming. ------------ Alex
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 16 Apr 2004, Frank Kemper wrote:

The different-from-the-rest-of-the-world-but-not-better-as-a-whole North American safety and emissions regulations are non-tariff trade barriers to protect the domestic car industry. The North American regulators self-righteously deny it, of course, but there's no other plausible explanation, especially since it would take about two months' work (max!) to identify the best practices in both sets of regulations and put together one set of standards, if the US insisted on not just going along with the standards used by the rest of the world.
Canada was looking at allowing rest-of-world (ECE-spec) cars in, a few years ago. Idea passed upward through Transport Canada, passed all safety analyses, but GM and Ford howled ("No! If we build a car for Germany, we want it to stay there!") and the US DOT howled ("No! If you do this, we'll be the only ones doing something different!") so the idea was scrapped.
National Highway Traffic "Safety" administration. <turn, spit, wipe>
DS
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stern wrote:

If the US consumers in great numbers actually got a look at what ford and GM offer the rest of the world they'd have to make better cars that cost more for the US market. Thing is they wouldn't be able to sell them for more. We'd actually get good value, and that cannot be allowed. Americans are to have crap unless they pay huge sums for something better.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No, I have one study where the saving would be $2.000,— per vehicle if US had scruppered its FMVSS and switched to the ECE regulations.
Oliver
Brent P wrote:

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<top posting corrected>


Prime example of why you shouldn't top post. You lost the meaning of what I posted. The cars for 'rest of the world' from ford and GM are often superior in every area, areas not covered by regulation such as handling. The cars clearly cost more than the often warmed over models we get here in the USA. Compare a ford of austrailia falcon to a tempo for instance. Hell compare it to a taurus. Do the same with the holdens for GM. Regulations are used as a barrier to keep those cars from us.
Ford and GM save a considerable amount of money by selling cars that aren't as good as they should be in this country (USA). Trouble is only people like us, that are really knowledgable about cars world wide know what ford and GM are putting out for the rest of the world, know what they can really do.
It's a pile of crap that they cannot compete with the japanese or anyone else, they can, they choose not to in the USA because it's more profitable to play a regulation angle and cry poor. I've been in the blue oval camp for some time, but ford is going to have to reform it's ways before they'll get me back in the new car showroom. I know more now and I expect better from them than cheapened mustangs and created rarity with the few good cars they choose to sell in north america. Instead we are supposed to pay through the nose for premium makes like jaguar, etc that they own if we don't want to play the bidding game for the few cobras they make each year, etc.
They can take their marketing game and shove it as far as I am concerned.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 21 Apr 2004, Brent P wrote:

Give it up, Brent. Most of the world doesn't give a shit if people top post. It bugs you -- get over it.

Handling is actually regulated under ECE suspension-performance requirements. Brakes, too. Tires, too.

Yes, quite. There is an interesting SAE paper by Chrysler from 1998 which makes this exact point, calling different sets of safety regulations "non-tariff trade restrictions".

Yep.
No, they choose not to in the USA because they don't have to. Plenty of Americans buy their crap without complaint. Proof? The Lumina. The Taurus. Want more? I can go on...
DS
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stern wrote:


If I give it up, I'll stop trimming, editing, etc. If everybody 'gives it up' then this sort of communication will quickly become useless as each post carries a few hundred to a few thousand lines of garbage. Those who don't give a shit are simply passing the work on to others. So, I'll give it up for awhile, like I did with my last reply to jaybird.


otay

The existance of buyers for it I took as a given, as in several of my posts about how americans love to buy crap.

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Blue Oval does very well in the UK, regularly topping the best-seller lists with its Focus, widely praised in the UK for build quality and handling.
I have noticed that it has been the subject of serious (or any) recalls the way, I believe, the US version has been.
Ford of Europe engines are at the forefront of automotive development.
See UK data here: http://www.smmt.co.uk/home.cfm?CFIDX5293&CFTOKEN ‚740000
Click on 'Record March new car market' and download the report, which includes a spreadsheet of sales by manufacturer (unfortunately not by model).
March YTD: 1. Ford (15% market share) 2. Vauxhall (GM) (13%) 3. Peugeot (7%) 4. Renault (7%) 5. VW (excl Audi) (6%)
BMW at 12 (3.4%) and Merc at 13 (3.3% are level-pegging and just beat Audi at 14 (3.0%). If Mini and Smart are added then BMW does significantly better.
In Mar 04 itself the Top 5 stay the same with only slightly different market shares.
Similary for BMW, Merc and Audi, though BMW's position is strengthened slightly.
I have crossposted this to BMW as the readers there may be interested in these numbers.
DAS
--
For direct contact replace nospam with schmetterling
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Found stats for individual models:
In Mar 04 the Ford Focus was Numero Uno in the UK for month and YTD and its diesel version topped the diesel list.
YTD
Focus 43,115
Corsa 33,355
206 29,479
Fiesta 27,217
Astra 23,496
Mιgane 22,283
Clio 21,688
Mondeo 19,067
Golf 18,366
307 17,830
The Corsa and Astra are Vauxhall/GM. 206 and 307 are Peugeot Megane and Clio are Renault. Focus, Fiesta and Mondeo are Ford.
March 04
23,190 Focus
20,750 Corsa
18,973 206
17,013 Fiesta
13,432 Clio
13,041 Astra
12,307 3 series
12,221 Mιgane
11,122 307
10,559 Mondeo
BMW pops up!!
DAS
--
For direct contact replace nospam with schmetterling
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Apr 2004, Ennui Society wrote:

Oh? Which study? I haven't seen that one, would love to see it. Got publication data? Or fax it to me, I have a toll-free fax number (contact me via my website and I'll send you the number)
DS
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

72055508&rd=1
I would do a lot of homework before bidding on a car that was not originally meant to be sold in the US. You could end up losing quite a bit of money if you don't. ---------- Alex
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just out of curiosity: What if a foreigner brings his car to the US and uses it with its original license plates? Decades ago I read of a Porsche 917 Le Mans race car which drove on european roads - with an Arizona registration on it.
Frank
--
please replace spam-muelleimer with fk-newsgroups for e-mail contact

Time Flies Like An Arrow - Fruit Flies Like A Banana
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.