W123 Alignment: Anything Special?

I took my '82 300CD to the local Goodyear shop for an alignment last week, after having the upper and lower control arms replaced. The guy at the counter hesitated
almost imperceptibly when I told him the car was a Mer- cedes, which kind of put me on my guard. Then when I told him the year, he kind of looked at me sideways and started with this dire-sounding, rising-inflectioned, "Oh, I don't KNOW-oowwww..." stuff.
The guy told me that aligning a Mercedes is "different" from aligning other cars, and that the procedure requires a special tool of some sort -- which, like the requisite knowledge, only one guy in the shop had. And predictably, he wasn't going to be in that day. Then he told me that the newest Mercedes models were so different from other cars in this respect that they had to go to the dealership to be aligned, since the Goodyear store wasn't equipped to do the work.
What the hell? I'd been taking my cars (this one and the '85 300D I had prior to it) in there for tires and align- ments for four years with no hint that there was anything significantly different or difficult about doing a front- end alignment on them. (And this employee, the store manager, was usually the person I dealt with.)
I ended up getting the work done after all, and after only an hour so so (after the manager had insisted the work would take two or three hours even though I was the first customer in the door), since the mechanic with the allegedly special knowledge showed up after all. But I'm curious about what I was told about Mercedes requiring some special skill and knowledge to align. Was this guy jerking me off, or was I just lucky in the past?
Geoff
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when I took it to non dealers, they said MB doesn't release the specs to just anybody, so they couldn't do my car...

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M-B uses a bubble level that clamps onto the wheel's mounting (not lug) bolts. The tool is unique to M-B and makes the job easy.
That said, a standard alignment rack will also do the job, although not with the same ease.
The camber is adjusted by an eccentric bolt on the lower control arm bushing and the caster is adjusted by the rod that extends from the wheel rearward to the frame behind the fender.
The toe-in is identical to all other cars.
There are no mechanical adjustments to the rear suspension, its rear wheel toe in is controlled by the car's riding height, not some adjustment.
And the manager is correct about the later models - a kit is required for all but toe-in adjustments.
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Well, I found myself (last January) involved in an almost identical story when aligning my W208 CLK320. I finally decided to bring her to the Mercedes dealer, and I was wondering about what was going on, in the same way than you.
I am posting from Madrid, Spain, but the shop involved was in Oviedo, Asturias (northern Spain).
Zascandil
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