W126 aluminum vs steel hood

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ATE Powedisc is great choice. I use them all the time. Buy ceramic pads to go with it.

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Really, ceramics? I've been using prb metal masters, thought you recommended them to me? I don't care 1 cent about brake dust, I wash my car every week anyways. Also don't care about having to frequently replace pads, all I care about is having bite and not fading.
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LOL!!!!
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Yes, I kinda prefers the MetalMaster...Ceramic is also excellent... but not as great as the MetalMaster.
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Hmmm, the people who distribute the metal masters to the US tell me that I would get more bite from the Axxis (aka PBR) Ultimate pads.
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Ultimate is their ceramic pad. I got that on my front brake on my current MB. Great initial grab... better than MetalMaster... sorta like standard pad...
The only thing I missed about MM is the ability to modulate the brake force... how hard you step on the brake, the more stopping power there is. With Ultamate, that is not there... It just got gobs of bites right away... yet it doesn't give you more braking power the harder you step on the pad... sorta less grab the hotter it gets.
Very subjective... I just like to have the control. Ultimate is dusty when first installed, but later clears out. Bosch Ceramic pad is supposed to be good too with zero break-in period.
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On the other tentacle, he did discover in retrospect that his braking system was unexpectedly deficient (the wrong pads, and probably too long on the car). Yeah, his own fault, but then it all comes down to human error in the end, doesn't it?
How about saying it was a combination of factors, including driving too , improper and worn brake pads, and Suburban Assault Vehicles with inappropriate bumper heights?
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Thanks Will, but I think I'm done reading this hate fest. T.G. (and T.G. alone) already answered my question, time to un-star this thread.
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My '80 300SD has an aluminum hood and trunk lid to save weight. The only downside is that the trunk lid hasn't the inertia to slam shut - so one lowers the lid and then presses it shut - click.
I'd take aluminum anytime.
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(I don't know the correct eng/am name for it) - who repairs tin and other body damage on car....told me that any hood (or trunk) should be closed by simply letting go the hood to drop from like - 50cm and to shut close. that way, you will ensure it's safely closed, and you will prevent it from getting bent or other kind of damage you can make by -push click shutting it.
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Strange. In the owner's manual for my dad's BMW it specifies not to do the drop shut but to do the push click shut on the hood. It's also the only car I've ever had/driven that the push click shut actually was capable of shutting the hood.
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He's right to say that.
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"He's right to say that. "
I agree. A well designed and built hood/trunk lid should close with a modest amount of hand pressure. And as you pointed out, on some cars, like our 300SD's, the lid is so light you can't close it by dropping it from any height. Plus it closes so very nice with just a little pressure, it's a chance to marvel at the craftsmanship. Sort of like enjoying the vault like sound when the doors close!
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well said Conrad
the case, minus a few cans!
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Amen.
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My advice is to call some car recycling companies (junkyards). Used hood and fender should be 300 ,if you are lucky and they have them in the right colour it's an easy an cheap fix. Also buy a used headlight, a new one will be brighter and will look strange. I replaced a front fender after someone hit it with his trailer for 50 and one hour work. If there is more damage underneath go to a small repair shop, big bodywork companies work mostly on new leased cars an are much more expensive. Dont spent money on special brakes unless you are a professional rally driver. The standard brakes are very good for normal use. Special brakes are better cooled and more heat resistant, if you need that on normal roads you drive much to fast. If the normal pads wear out to quickly you can use harder (taxi) pad. They last longer but are less effective. High performance pads are hard on the rotors. If you drive more defensive you have to brake less, the 126 is a nice car but not a sports car.
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Yeah, I'm not bothering with high performance brakes so much any more. It ws determined on another forum that something is up with my brakes (in dry weather I can't get the abs to kick in no matter how hard I brake, and it's not because the ABS is messed up but because it won't stop hard enough to need it), so when I get my car back I'm going to replaced the lines, pads, and rotors and flush the fluid and take it from there.
I'll get body parts in the same color if I need to, but I rather have them painted to match since junkyard parts won't have the color to them. All I can find in the same color is the fender anyways, no hoods.
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Maybe your calipers need to be serviced. The rubber rings inside get harder over time. Repair sets are not very expensive and it's a relatively easy job, but you cant afford to make mistakes with brakes. If you have no experience with brakes it may be better to have them serviced by a specialist or else get some good advice before you begin. If you do it yourself check the brand of the calipers, for the 126 there are two brands of calipers. This will significantly increase your braking power.
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The extent of my brake work so far is pads (it's all I've had the opportunity to do since getting enough car experience under my belt to feel comfortable touching brakes), but my dad used to also do the rotors on his 300D back in the day, so I'll just wait to do all this until summer (and just leave a LOT of room between me and other cars until then...my brakes aren't totally defficient so I don't think it's dangerous as long as I keep them in mind) and have him help me do everything. The caliper rebuild kits are only $15, so I'll add them to my list (pads, rotors, rebuild calipers, replace brake lines). I have the service manuals in book and CD form, so it shouldn't be too hard. Richard
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Rebuilding callipers is not very difficult. There are a few things to keep in mind: 1- Only use alcohol based cleaning fluid, petroleum based fluids destroy the rubber in the braking system. Brake fluid is good 2- Use the correct brake fluid 3- Getting the pistons out may be difficult. Compressed air can be handy, with en piece of hose over the nozzle of the airgun. But remember to put some wood between the pistons, not your fingers or anything else that may hurt. 4- Put the pistons back in their original bores 5- Do not scratch the pistons or the bore, if the are damaged they must be replaced 6- Be very careful with the bleeding nipples, they brake easily. Mercedes callipers and nipples are not so bad.
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