What gas and oil to put in '66 w110 200

Hi,
What gas and oil would I put into a '66 w110 200
I can't believe that a 40 year old 2L 4cyl engine would move a car like this so briskly :-)
Does anyone have any advice on what other fluids (grease, additive, etc) are
good for this car?
As well, the car is great mechanically but the interior needs some work, anyone know of any online stores that sell parts for these old cars? Any brick-and-mortar stores in the BC or Washington state area?
TIA
cp
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http://misc.articles.mbz.org/fluids /
Premium gas, any decent oil per the manufacturors spec.

Not likely for an oldtimer like this.
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Perfect, thanks!

Premium for a carburetted (two of them) engine?
Thanks, cp
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The octane rating has nothing to do with the method of fuel and air mixture; it is a function of the compression ratio. Higher compression engines require higher octane fuel.
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hmmmm what difference would it make between using low octane and high octane? I've talked to two mechanics who specialize in these cars and said regular is good for the 200 model. I'll try the higher octane.
Thank you for your advice! cp
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Lower octane fuels are more prone to pre-ignition when pushed to the limits of compression. this can cause engine damage over time.
Marty
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Yeh, that I understand, so what's the compression on this engine (121 940) ?
Can I put in 94? If I can't use cheap might as well use the best :-)
cp
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What's the compression of this engine (121 940)
TIA cp
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For a European car I would check it can take unleaded petrol (i.e. does not require the lead in the fuel for lubrication, or whatever it was). I think in the US unleaded was used earlier, so may not be an issue. In UK there is/was something called lead replacement fuel, aimed at older vehicles that theoretically need the old-style leaded fuel.
DAS
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Lead, specifically tetraethyl lead, was used to increase the octane rating of fuel. It had nothing to do with lubrication. The higher the octane rating of fuel, the less easily it combusts, but when it does, it burns more quickly and evenly. Lower octane fuels will actually tend to combust under compression ratios approaching 11:1. Higher octane fuels won't combust at these high compression ratios, remaining stable until the piston is at the top of its travel and the mixture is ignited via the spark plug. Lead was used to suppress premature combustion due to compression, which can damage internal engine components. One of the most obvious results of using fuel with an insufficient octane rating is "valve rattle" or "ping" which is actually combustion taking place before piston has reached the top of its travel. Not only can this damage valve seats, but it puts excessive wear on the piston itself as well as the crankshaft. The elimination of lead in gasoline was only an issue because the other chemicals needed to create high octane fuels were more expensive.
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THen why does unleaded fuel kill the valve seats on cars that require leaded?
MB has used hardened seats on all postwar cars so it's not an issue but if youlook at British car magazies (for exmaple Classics and Sports Car) you'll see lots of references to "engine converted to unleaded head" and they can still get premium over there.
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wrote:

What I know are facts. Using fuel with a lower octane rating than required can, over time, cause valve seat damage and other engine problems. Using an air/fuel mixture that is too rich can also cause these same problems. Tetraethyl lead can be used as a gasoline additive to boost a fuel's octane rating. In the days of carbureted engines, many drivers used higher octane fuel than was necessary to compensate for improperly adjusted or malfunctioning carburetors. Lead is poisonous to humans.
Claims that lead additives were required to lubricate the valve seals are unsubstantiated. Some people will claim that the removal of lead caused irreparable damage to their engines, while others will tell you they have driven vehicles with these same "lead required" engines hundreds of thousands of miles on unleaded fuel with no problems. This is a very political issue in that there are accusations that the whole concept of leaded fuel being required by older engines with soft valve seats was just a myth created by the corporations that were manufacturing the lead additives. Honestly, since I know no facts about this, I can't say which is correct.
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Thanks for the info!

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All postwar Mercedes can use unleaded fuel. They have hardened valve seats.
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Probably. You can of course fiddle with the timing to make is run on anything, but I suspect you'llfind it runs better with the timing correct and running on premium.
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There is a wrecking yard on Aurora in Seattle which is coincidentally called Aurora auto wrecking.
http://www.auroraaw.com /
I have no idea about parts that old, but worth a call. They are pretty nice and also have good prices(not comparable to online prices) on many new Mercedes parts.
Marty
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Thanks a lot. Luckily, it looks like the only thing I need is some trim.
cp
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