why do mercedes diesel last forever?

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Well, my non turbo 617 five cylinder diesel only made it to 208,000 when the timing chain broke. Since I rebuilt it, I put another 60,000 miles on it. Now it's using a quart of oil in 3,500 miles. When I opened it to rebuild it, there was cylinder wall taper on all the cylinders and fine cracks in the head. After boring the existing cylinder liners 0.25 mm oversize, installing a new set of Mahle pistons and buying a new head, the engine runs great. I also did replace all the exhaust valves as the stems were worn and the camshaft which had broken in two when the chain broke. I have a couple of 1985 300D turbo cars with nearly 200,000 miles on each one. No engine work on either of those yet. Mercedes diesels don't last forever but they do last longer than most anything else.
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lasted longer then my marriage
the case, minus a few cans!
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Don't you know that 400000 miles is within reach for gas engines as well?
The best example is the taxi recordmen with its Plymouth Fury 1964 who put 1 600 000 miles before being scraped in an accident. Granted, he passed four gas engines. But the average engine life was... 400 000 miles. '60s technology.
Another published example in 'Washington Post' is the Honda Accord 1994 with 1 080 000 miles. 130 000 miles a year. Original powertrain and exhaust.
So it is hard to be impressed with diesel longevity when gas engines will do the same. Anyway most people will be fed up with the car before the 250000 miles mark.

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On Fri, 14 Nov 2003 09:50:00 -0500, "Saintor"

you offer as proof a guy who needed 4 engines to get to 600k a one in a million honda to go up against thousands of diesels that are made to get 300k+ miles, what is your point?
The fact is that diesels will last longer than gas engines, and like you say, in most cases the owners will tire of the car long before the engine gives out.
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Not 600K, 1600K! In fact 1,621,000 miles.

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Just contact MB and ask how many mileage badges they have given out to diesels, particularly the 5 cylinder.
JJ
Saintor wrote:

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Gasoline engines rarely make it to high mileage. Even if they do make it to fairly high mileage, they need many more repairs than any diesel. How many ignition parts and fuel system parts would a gasoline engine require to make it to 300,000 miles? Diesels on the other hand, have an almost trouble free mechanical fuel injection system and no electronics on the engine (well, some of the latest diesels do have electronic injection). It's common for big rig truck diesels to make it to one million miles or more between rebuilds. While you might be able to find a few gasoline engines which make it to high mileage, these are the exceptions to the rule.
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"Rarely male it to high mileage"... Are you kidding?
99.9% of taxis and fleet cars (not rentals) in North America have gas engines and 200 000 miles is not even a challenge, for most of them.
300000+ miles gas engines? Yes I have seen some. And there are a lot on the site above mentionned; http://www.hondabeat.com/highmiles.php
LOOK AT IT, you'll be surprised with the number of 300000 miles+ cars with the original gas engine.

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You define high mileage differently than most diesel owners. Most diesel owners consider 200,000 miles a fairly low mileage diesel. How many gas engines make it to 500,000 miles and above? I'm sure there are some but they are few and far between.
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Don't tell me that most diesels do 300000 miles. It is just not true. Neither 200000 miles is not considered as "a fairly low mileage" even for diesels cars! We are not talking about trucks here. Come on...
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Re: why do mercedes diesel last forever? Group: alt.auto.mercedes Date: Sat, Nov 15, 2003, 7:56pm From: snipped-for-privacy@REMOVETHIShotmail.com (Saintor) Don't tell me that most diesels do 300000 miles. It is just not true. Neither 200000 miles is not considered as "a fairly low mileage" even for diesels cars! We are not talking about trucks here. xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 82 300SD 251,000 miles on it. uses NO oil runs at over 100mph
case
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had the original clutch in it. And other friend who drove his 240D to 550,000 miles. I have an 1985 300D turbo with 200,000 miles on it and it doesn't even burn any oil between 3,500 mile changes yet. Diesels last a very long time if you change the oil on a regular basis and don't overheat an engine.
You seem to ignore the fact that diesel engines are built differently than gasoline engines. Mercedes claims that their diesel passenger car engines cost $2,500 more to build than their gasoline counterparts. In a Mercedes diesel engine you will find the pistons have a steel insert for the top compression ring groove. Diesels also have super hard cylinder liners, ball bearing valve rotators, steel valve guides and a host of other improvements you won't find in a gasoline engine. Diesel engines also don't have an ignition system to maintain.
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Yes but for each M-B like this, there are 10-20 Honda/Toyota/Ford Crown Victoria that did the same. Hardly an achievement.
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And you base your claim on what? I've owned Toyotas and Hondas and while the engines would hang in there to nearly 200,000 miles (always with head work) the balance of the car just fell apart. If gasoline engines were so long lived, I would expect truck and train manufacturers would have long since switched over to gasoline power. The fact is diesel costs less to maintain and is more economical to run. And while you can find instances of gasoline engines going to high mileage, you will find more diesel engines going to the same or higher mileage with lower repair and fuel costs .
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Saintor must be on drugs.
Y'all want to put an end to this thread and B.S. like what Saintor is writing?
I'll take either one of my mid 80's Diesel and he can provide any (New or Old) gas engine vehicle, (as a former Honda Civic owner, I say 'bring on your Honda) and we'll head out into the desert, fill both of them up, and then run down the highway Full Open Throttle. After about an hour at 100+ MPH, he'll be broken down on the side of the road, and I'll keep going.
That's why diesels last forever. They're designed differently. They're built differently. They behave differently.
'Nuff said.
--
Signed,

Kevin L. Bray
  Click to see the full signature.
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Ridiculous. Any normal gas engine will run endless hours at 100+ mph, desert or not. Not even a challenge. Remove your pink glasses, please.
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So true -- a friend owns an 87 Honda Prelude (carbureted, last year of that engine, about 160k miles) and one night I took off up a hill and ended up reaching about 115mph in my 87 300D before I slowed and let him catch up... he finally came along, proud his "baby" with $3000 in work done to it since he bought it had reached 100mph, at which point he backed off because he didn't think it was safe (too many bad noises). We looked over at his car and realized it was pinging like crazy and was overheating. I ended up towing him 6 miles home... with my 175k Merc.
He's since replaced the water pump and radiator, without any sucess. The thing drinks water and oil like crazy and he's about to give up and buy a 190D.
He and I are convinced. Mike
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Like in a M-B as well. I don't see why it would be worse in a gas engine than in a diesel.
If gasoline engines were so long lived, I

Why are you mixing things? Trucks are a completely different business. Diesels in trucks provide massive low-end torque and are cheaper to run, no contest.

This is where we disagree about cars. All data of highest mileage cases published will say otherwise. Most of them are gas powered!
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Where are you finding this "published" data which shows that most high mileage engines are gasoline engines?
Why do I "mix things"? Because diesel engines are used in trucks, trains and as stationary generators because of their long life, low repair frequency and lower operating cost. The torque character of diesels while a major factor in trucking probably plays a lesser role in it's selection for diesel electric train engines or stationary generators. Actually, diesels have a broad torque peak and not simply low end torque. My point is that diesel engines are selected when maximum engine life and low operating cost are important factors. You don't seem to accept that. Perhaps you're just a troll.
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I can see that you are at hopeless point.
Anyway everything has been said. - It is not true that high mileage CARS are exclusively diesels. - It is not true that in these high mileage CARS, there are more diesels - It is not true as per data, that diesels CARS last longer. - America car fleets industry agree since there is no diesel here. The only way to have more diesel in N.A. is to increase the oil price (make it cleaner too). Longevity of the engines is not a point because gas engines longevity is apparently more than you wish, and in fact (against your theory) perfectly comparable to diesels. Get used to it. Just facts.
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