P0440, P0441, P0446 '03 Corolla CE

Can anyone offer an explaination to the diag codes I received that are causing the Check Eng light to come on in my car? I am ready to get dirty if I can get some guidance on what to replace and how. I just sold my other car and have another kid on the way...can't a brother catch a break? -phrogdriver

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A brother can catch a break by knowing that these three codes don't have anything to do with how the car runs mechanically, and barring an state emissions test could stay on indefinitely without any driveability issues. Who cares about evaporative fuel emissions? But anyway, the evaporative emissions system is responsible for making sure that no fumes from the gas tank get into the atmosphere. It does this by taking said fumes, storing them in a charcoal canister, and at certain times while you are driving releasing them into the engine's intake to be burned, thus ensuring sparkling rivers and streams for future generations.

Besides the obvious "check the gas cap" these three codes indicate a malfunction somewhere in the evap system, which is fairly complicated and can't effectively be diagnosed over the internet. Hell, half the "technicians" out there either reset the light and say it's fixed, or toss a vacuum switching valve or charcoal canister at it and hope it doesn't come back. So, if these are the only three codes you have, I wouldn't be terribly concerned. You should find someone competent with OBDII systems sometime, and if you put it off for any length of time, recheck the codes periodically to make sure that there aren't any others popping up. As far as getting into it yourself, the obvious causes for these three codes would be a loose gas cap or a disconnected vacuum hose near the air box. Give it a good look, post if you have any other questions.

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On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 20:47:04 -0400, qslim wrote:

Um, Al Gore...?

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One of my favorite summer activities includes turning on all the lights in my house, cranking the AC down to 60, starting both my cars and my bike, and watching a bucket of gasoline evaporate while I sit on my back porch listening to the Live Earth concerts.

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You're MEAN!!! ROFL <vbg>

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On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 23:29:02 -0400, qslim wrote:

That's not good!

I was driving around in a 23MPG car at 25 MPH, delivering newspapers on a 48 mile route, with the windows open to make my job easy and the heat CRANKED!

Then, I got home, turned on the tube and turned up the AC after 10AM when it finally got warm.

Note: Driving around at 3 AM with the heat cranked...

Cause it was C-C-C-C-COLD!!! (45 Degrees)

In JULY!!!!

Yup! Global Warming, OK!

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On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 20:47:04 -0400, qslim wrote:

*I would reset the ECU...gee, come to think of it, I *DID* reset the ECU on my Tercel...frequently!

It would run great for 2 startups, then throw the codes and drop about 5 MPG...until I reset the ECU again.

The last thing I did before I sold it was to clean the ports on the vacuum-connected sensors, and clean/replace the vacuum lines. I ran it for two weeks without throwing a code, and then sold it so I could buy my Supra...goodbye, 45MPG, hello VR-O-O-O-O-OOOOOOOOOMMMMMM!

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Actually yeah, that's the one thing I guess I left out. When it comes to evap codes sometimes its worth resetting the system and seeing if the code comes back. I remember a few instances where for the life of me I could not find anything wrong with the system, and the code never re-appeared after I reset it. Ghost in the machine..

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On Jul 21, 7:50 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

My wife's car -- a 2001 Camry CE -- had the same codes a year ago. It wasn't the gas cap. I replaced it first. The dealer said the car needed a new charcoal cannister and an induction flush for about 1000 dollars. The induction flush sounded like pouring a can of goop in the gas tank, and I wasn't sure about the cannister, so I got out the Haynes and started pulling the VSVs in the evap system. There's one on the air intake. It was ok. There's one on the charcoal cannister behind the gas tank. It was bad -- didn't click when 12V was applied. I replaced it for $57 and everything has been hunky dory since.

I'd suggest checking the VSVs -- vacuum switching valves. There's one that I know only comes with the cannister, so you have to buy the whole shebang, but there are two and maybe three that can be replaced separately. Also, inspect the hoses as best you can to ensure they aren't worn through or unattached.

The system works when the engine is off by storing gasoline fumes in the cannister -- the switches without juice open to allow the fumes to be absorbed by the charcoal in the cannister. When the ignition is on and the engine is running, the switches change to purge the cannister into the intake where the fumes are burned.

If you're lucky, the problem will be hoses or a VSV. If you're not, the cannister is cracked and you'll have to spring for a new one.

Good luck,

Mike Davis

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wrote:

Actually you ONLY have to spring for a new one if you live in a jurisdiction which mandates emission inspections.

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Cleaning the VSV may help. Do so by prying the metal fingers holding the port cover carefully, clean and lightly lube the solenoid piston. If any part breaks then you have to buy. I tried it and worked. Not the best EVAP design IMO.

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You may still be covered under the emissions warranty. So you may want to check with Toyota before starting any work. However, some components may be covered under the shorter 3/36 warranty.

Toyota has problems with the charcoal canister design since the redesign in 97. Some changes were made in 02 on the Camry, but the Corolla may still have the old design. The canister can disintegrate on the inside and sending carbon dust all over the system. If this is the case, all VSV, hoses, canister have to be changed ($$$$$) like the other owner wrote.

On Jul 21, 4:50 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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