REPORT: Chinese government approves of Chery's bid to purchase Volvo

If, like us, you've been following the Volvo saga pretty closely, you'll remember that several Chinese companies are considered to be among the top
bidders for the Swedish automaker when Ford officially opens the bidding. Although Geely has said they aren't interested, that didn't rule out other Chinese outfits. Well, today we have word via Chinese news reports that Chery, for one, has been given the greenlight to enter the Volvo lottery by the Chinese government. Other interested parties are ru... Read More: http://feeds.autoblog.com/~r/weblogsinc/autoblog/~3/q1_Xjs8RbkM /
----------------------------------- Volvo NewsHub: Latest auto news sourced from websites, portals and blogs http://www.carshops247.co.uk/news/Volvo.html
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

remember that several Chinese companies are considered to be among the top bidders for the Swedish automaker when Ford officially opens the bidding. Although Geely has said they aren't interested, that didn't rule out other Chinese outfits. Well, today we have word via Chinese news reports that Chery, for one, has been given the greenlight to enter the Volvo lottery by the Chinese government. Other interested parties are ru...

I pretty well lost interest in the post-Ford involvement Volvos, but a Chinese company is even worse, at that point RIP Volvo.
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Ah so, Vo-vo.
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if the chineese take over volvo...i will never buy another one......just my $.02...not that it matters....
cheers

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Well, Chinese stewardship of the brand couldn't be much worse than Ford's.
Though I'm not likin' the idea of having everything I buy - from crap at Wal-Mart to my favorite car - support a communist nation.
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Notroll2007 schrieb:

Bought 6 Volvos in my Life. Last year a C70 for $ 50'000. Done! Last one! Chinese? Never !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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yep, i have owned 5 or 6 volvos, i have lived and visited mainland china, tiawian, etc....i would NEVER buy another volvo if the commies "got them"......
cheers
" Bought 6 Volvos in my Life. Last year a C70 for $ 50'000. Done! Last one! Chinese? Never !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! "
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You haven't been to China lately. It is capitalist, just not a democracy. The rich are getting richer. Some CEO's fly to work in helicopters. I think Lenin would roll over in his grave if he knew. If he does, they will sell tickets for all inclusive tours to the Kremlin to see it.
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Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA, USA
Owned '67,'68,'71,'74,'79,'81,'87,'93,'95 & '01 Volvos.
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On Mar 7, 3:14am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

What I find interesting in this and other threads about the possible re-sale of Volvo Cars to another car manufacturer is their similarity to all of the complaining and agonizing when Volvo was sold to Ford. Threats to never buy another Volvo again because the brand somehow lost it's swedish identity in 1999. Of course once the deal was done boycotts were quickly forgotten and we kept buying bricks.
Apparently the concern now is that Volvo is losing it's american identity. It's worth remembering that Volvo cars have for a long time included many parts originating in many countries other Sweden. And it is worth remembering that if Volvo isn't sold to a non-swedish owner with pockets full of cash that the brand could very well cease to exist. And finally, we should recognize that the brand with it's identifying features would undoubtedly be continued with the new owner. To do otherwise would rapidly dilute the identity of the car.
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Just think, we're going from a Swedish company who has brought us safety and environmental innovations such as seat belts, airbags, and catalytic converters, to become a Chinese owned corporation which may source out parts to companies that have manufactured lead painted toys, children cough syrup with ethylene glycol, milk and pet food tainted with melamine.
The year that Volvo will be sold to a Chinese concern will be the last model year that I will consider to purchase. No sino Volvo for me! It was bad enough that Ford bought them but this is an order of magnitude worse.
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Your short term memory must be failing. Volvo Cars is not a swedish company - it is american owned. And look at the pollution the americans have brought upon the world. Consider all of the mercury spewing forth into the air as coal burning power plants continue to be built and used. Etc., etc.

So you will apparently buy your last Volvo in the year that Volvo is sold to a chinese company. In other words you will celebrate the sale by buying one of the first Volvo cars made under chinese ownership. Nice of you...

What exactly makes it worser than worse?
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That was relatively recent, and thankfully Ford didn't seem to stick their fingers in the works too much, and being American, I'd much rather support and American company than Chinese, though the domestic brands never impressed me much. It never used to bother me, but it's so hard to buy anything anymore that isn't made in China, and while some of it is ok, I find the quality control and consistency to be marginal at best, and so much of what they make are shameless copies of quality items. It will take a long time before I trust anything that comes from there.
My personal interest is in the old RWD models, they'll never build them like that again, thankfully there are enough of them out there still that I'm unlikely to ever run out.
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No, that's not what I meant. If you recall how the production year of a automobile is done, this year's model vehicles were tooled, parts procured, and inventory scheduled from the prior year. So if Volvo were to be sold today to China, this production year would be pre-Chinese. Let me know if I'm wrong here....
In the case of Ford, I've always deplored their safety record. Do you recall the exploding Pinto, the collapsing roof of a F150, and fuel tank fires on their Crown Vic police cruisers? In the US, we still have legal recourse when such negligence is uncovered. There are federal regulations and product laws to correct this but with China, I just don't believe such recourse exist for the common citizen.
Just a thought, when I buy a Volvo part for my 11 year old V70 or S90, that part is still made in Europe under Ford ownership. If this is Chinese owned, I don't believe it will remain so but I hope I'm wrong.
Regardless, I'm still disgusted with the whole thing...
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You should say what you mean.

I'm not sure you can characterize a production year with a nationality. The stock ownership may change at a given point in time but that is about it. For example if Volvo is sold to Geely on 6/30/2009 then Geely will own the Volvo brand as well as the assets and liabilities that are transferred over. A Volvo made on 6-29-2009 and 7-1-2009 will likely have parts from exactly the same sources and will likely look exactly the same. The new owners may over time change the mix of numerous countries in which they have parts suppliers. That said I don't see where it would make any business sense for the new owner to all of a sudden switch parts, designs and downgrade quality.

Recourse in China is irrelevant unless you plan on travelling to China and buying directly on the local market. That's a move I would not recommend for any car whether BMW, Mercedes or Volvo. If you buy a Volvo in the USA you would have legal recourse in the USA against the importer as it is right now for any other international brand.

Sure it does. For example when Yugo fell flat all the suits went against the esteemed USA importer and not Yugo in eastern europe. Remember the disastrous Subaru 360 eposide? Similar outcome.

If you look carefully few of the parts in Volvo's are of swedish origin. I'm not sure I understand your specirfic concern. Is it about non-swedish parts, non-usa parts non-japanese parts or somehting else.

I'm not sure what you want to remain or not change. The parts mix in Volvo cars is truly international as with many other brands these days.

What are you so disgusted about? The sale of car brands to other owners? If the brand isn't sold to someone with cash to keep it running then it will likely fail in my opinion. From my perspective the loss of a brand with such a fine history is an undesirable outcome no matter who owns the stock.
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I wouldn't be shocked, afterall GM did that with Saab. They immediately discontinued the 900 model, took one of their models, the Opel Vectra as I recall, gave it a facelift and called it the Saab 900, completely different car, and virtually anyone who has owned both, particularly the V6 will attest to it being inferior.
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I'm not sure the loss of an old model like the 900 is a bad thing. I sent one daughter away to school with a used 900. It was a nice design for it's time but a car company has to consider it's competition.
I sent the other daughter away to schoool with a 240 It served it's purpose, but the design was seriously out of date in 1994.
Imagine where Ford would be if it had simply continued making the 1950 Ford Custom. Or if Saab had simply continued the cramped 93 with a buzzy little 3 cylinder motor.
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It was just an example, at the time, the new 900 was inferior to the classic 900 that it replaced, both are technically obsolete now, but the classic 900 is much more desirable and nice examples are worth more now to enthusiasts. I'm personally very fond of the classic 900, there's just nothing else like it out there before or since, and I would take a brand new one of those over most of the other new cars available any day, but that's irrelevant, the point is GM took over and immediately replaced a model with one of their own designs and gave it the same name. In the time since, there have been catastrophes such as the 97 which is nothing but a GM trailblazer, the brand is really nothing but a brand anymore, similar to the classic radio and hifi brands now appearing on Chinese junk. Just the other day I saw a "Crosley" radio which was made to look vintage but was in fact a cheap flimsy modern radio with a CD player. I also came across a "Dual" car CD player, no relation aside from the name itself to the well regarded turntables of the 70s. Quite a few well known American tool brand names are now owned by Chinese companies that slap the name on cheap inferior quality tools which are then sold on the reputation of the name alone. Things may change, as happened with Japan in the 70s, but at the present moment, I associate "made in China" with cheap goods of inferior quality.
I must be seriously out of date myself, because I think the 240 is a fantastic design and still serves quite a few people very well. Just because something is new does not automatically make it better, but that mentality does drive the rampant wasteful consumerism that the US is so well known for. I could afford to buy a brand new Volvo if I wanted one, but I prefer nicely maintained older stuff. Most new cars are far too rounded and bubbly for my taste, and too cramped under the hood.
I suspect new 1950 Fords would sell like hotcakes, lots of people love a bit of nostalgia, but they would never meet modern regulations. You can buy all new parts to build a 1932 Ford from scratch, ends up costing a lot more than buying a late model, but hot rodders do it.
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Whether you or I feel nostalgic about a given model really doesn't mean much in the decision to continue a given model or kill and replace with something new. A more important factor is really whether one model will sell a sufficient number of cars or not. If current and prospective Volvo buyers would line up in sufficient numbers to buy a PV544, 140 or 240 then Volvo could make a lot more money by not changing models. But consumer tastes and wants change over time and if all you have to offer is vehicular nostalgia it won't sell many cars.
I happpen to think my latest Volvo V70 is an improvement over the early S80, which was an improvement over the 960 which was an improvement over the 740 which was an improvement over the 240 that was once in the stable. The improvement in features, drivability and safety over that 25 year span has been dramatic. Each change was incrementally better in my estimation.
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I think that's debatable. Look at the serviceability issues between a RWD vehicle i.e. S90 as compared to a V70. The timing belt alone takes a leisurely 2 hours to replace on a S90 compared to about 4 on a V70. At $100 per hour, that is significant. With newer vehicles, the higher level of electronic and mechanical integration may produce a lower parts count to the manufacturer but it's proving very expensive to the consumer if that part needs to be replaced.
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Service schmervice...that's why I have a good mechanic. The Volvo cars of today are FAR better than those of 25 years ago in every respect.
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