timing marks from hell/distributor

rotor be pointing? Building up fuel in the cylinders and blowing out exhaust. All timing marks are where they're supposed 2 be according to the telltale manual. 2.0 8 valve eng. please help!@!!!!!!
Reply to
cletusthepimp
wrote:
The number one position on the distributor housing is roughly in the 11 o-clock position when looking into the engine compartment. Rotor should be pointed there with the cam and crank lined up to there respective marks as well.
Reply to
Madesio
Like he said, also the center of the rotor should point to the mark on distributor case. BTW, if you need a new distributor I have a brand new one-never used.
Reply to
Lost In Space/Woodchuck
ok rotor is at number one plug.flywheel mark is at 0.cam gear is level with the head intermediate and crank gear are lined up too.car still wont start.sounds like wires are crossed but we checked them.
Reply to
cletusthepimp
I usually find the ign coil fails and either causes a no-start, stall in wet weather, or poor running caused by a seemingly flooding condition but really caused by a weak spark condition. It still supplies a spark but it is too weak.
I can be wrong and there are other reasons why the engine is flooding! ;-) I ONLY purchase these ign. coils/transformers from the dealer! Check to see if that coil is an aftermarket unit. I have always seen them fail within 14 months and as soon as 1 week.
Reply to
dave AKA vwdoc1
I usually check the crank at TDC with the # 1 plug out and piston at the top. I usually set the distributor rotor EXACTLY at it's center with the notch in the distributor body.
Doesn't the Camshaft align to the upper mark on the timing belt cover piece attached to the valve cover? (Outer notch on camshaft sprocket with the mark on the cover)
Reply to
dave AKA vwdoc1
Another gotcha can be all the marks on the flywheel. I have inserted a large screwdriver in cylinder #1 and slowly turned the crank back and forth to determine where TDC really is. Then I look at the timing mark to see if I really understand which one is tdc. On some flywheels there can be 3-4 marks but none clearly maked as 0. After that I make sure the cam is timed properly using the dimple in the pulley/sprocket to the front of the head.
Also have someone crank the start while you hold on to the bolt you inserted in the spark plug wire. If you end up on the ground the coil might be producing a good spark. OK, you don't want to stop your heart then hold that bolt 3/8" off of a good ground. You should hear some good pops as the sparks fly.
Reply to
Jim Behning
wrote:
Another gotcha can be all the marks on the flywheel. I have inserted a large screwdriver in cylinder #1 and slowly turned the crank back and forth to determine where TDC really is. Then I look at the timing mark to see if I really understand which one is tdc. On some flywheels there can be 3-4 marks but none clearly maked as 0. After that I make sure the cam is timed properly using the dimple in the pulley/sprocket to the front of the head.
Have someone crank the start while you hold on to the bolt you inserted in the spark plug wire. If you end up on the ground the coil might be producing a good spark. OK, you don't want to stop your heart then hold that bolt 3/8" off of a good ground. You should hear some good pops as the sparks fly. That might not be a VW certified way to test but it works on small engines. Tiny spark with little sound on a small engine like a lawn mower suggests you did not pull the starter cord fast enough or the magneto is bad.
Reply to
Jim Behning
A 1991 Porsche carrera was brought onto my work bay to diagnose a raw fuel discharge out of the tail pipe. Looking at the bottom of the engine, it was observed that the exhaust pipe for #1 cyl was over soaked with fuel. It smoked clouds! The cause? Its fuel injector was stuck open 100% of the time! Everything else worked per spec. Check each injector for flickering using a Noid test light. Good luck.
Reply to
Regal953

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