platinum spark plugs

I just installed the new Bosch Platinum plugs for my Civic 1.5 LX. (4 cyl)
Back in the days I used to own a 93 Infiniti Q45, and with that car you had to install Platinum plugs. So, I thought why not replace my cheap
ass delco sparks as they were old and needed replacement with the plats, should I feel much of a different between the two?
I know Platinum plugs are much better, but honestly how much more of a difference could it possibly even make? maybe burn the fuel better, quicker or something like that? I am not sure.
Thanks, Janos
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They are supposed to last longer, 100000kms or so. Hondas don't really like Bosch plugs though, better to stick to NGK (they came from the factory with these). Bosch plugs run alot hotter, and are more suited to euro imports...
t
mopa wrote:

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Well, would it be safe to keep them in? I paid like $28 (7 each) dollars for them, and hate wasting money. They are the Bosch Platinum +4 Spark Plugs.
http://theodoregray.com/PeriodicTableDisplay/Samples/078.4/s12.JPG
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it would probably be ok to keep them but you have four electrodes in each cylinder now instead of 1...I would not want one of those things busting off in my cylinder..
Platinums are Ok and I have used them for years in every vehicle I have owned, including my current Honda, without problems. They will last longer than the NGK without a doubt.

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T L via CarKB.com wrote:

Yet another urban legend, sigh.
John
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John Horner wrote:

I don't think it's an urban legend - at least not about Bosch platinums. Their aftermarket platinum plugs feature a thin platinum wire buried flush against the end of the insulator. There's no "heat range" per se to them. My mechanic has nothing but bad things to say about using them in Japanese makes. They had unusual failures where the center electrode just vaporized away. Just look at the picture:
<http://www.boschusa.com/AutoParts/SparkPlugs/PlatinumPlus4
There's some inklings that the factory OEM platinum plugs by Bosch are more of the traditional platinum fused to nickel alloy design.
Personally I think only NGK or Denso should ever go into a Honda.
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within a year or so. No electrode left.
Mike
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Michael Pardee wrote:

Bosch claims that the pure platinum wire will resist erosion. However, it's a tiny tip (maybe .2 mm) and the only path for heat to travel out of the center electrode. A typical platinum plug has a 2 mm wide nickel alloy tip to transfer heat to the core.
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Michael Pardee wrote:

I also had bad results with Bosch Platinums in a first generation VW Passat in the early 1990s. I don't think the issues are Japanese/European vehicle correlated at all.
John
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Ok, so point blank? don't use Bosch Platinum plugs? use NGK or Denso plugs? are those Platinum, or should I just forget about using Platinum plugs all together?
Is the electrode the middle part of the plug, that looks like a piece of flint?
thanks for your help folks
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Don't use Bosch platinums. NGK or Denso are OK. All three manufacturers make both platinum and regular plugs.

You have at least TWO electrodes: 1) The LIVE electrode is the one in the middle inside the white ceramic. The other end of it connects to the spark plug wire. 2) The GROUND electrode is off to one side, and usually curves over top of the LIVE electrode. The distance between them is referred to as the "gap".
Some plugs have more than one GROUND electrode, and some specialized plugs have as many as four.
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mopa wrote:

NGK and Denso both make a variety of spark plug types. IMO the only difference between the various grades is the expected useable service life. The longest life plugs are the Iridium type, second longest is Platinum, shortest is conventional. Use any of the NGK or Denso plugs in your Honda without fear, and set your change interval based on the type.
John
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What sparkplugs do you guys use? Platinum or the el-cheapo?
and what one do you perfer is the best NGK or Denso?
So I assume that means I should rip out the Bosch that I installed? right, or would it be safe for me to keep them in there for a few months, before they need to be replaced. Anyways, why are they so bad?
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mopa wrote:

For your car. I'd just recommend standard NGK or Denso plugs changed every 15-20K miles. Installation in your car is easy, and there's no performance advantage to standard plugs changed more often. Less than $8 a set, and more frequent changes force you to check to plugs for potential engine problems.

Both are fine.

I'd say pull 'em out if they cause any problems. You may not get any.
Most platinum plugs are tolerant of a wide heat range. BTW - I was wrong about there not being a "heat range" with Bosch plats. It's just that the thin platinum wire isn't a very capable means of transferring heat. The problem is the basic design.
Like it was said, the aftermarket Bosch platinum plug is a rather unconventional design. It features a thin platinum center electrode that doesn't extend beyond the tip. They rely on the platinum being able to withstand the additional heat. Sometimes it gets hotter than platinum can withstand. There have been reports of strange failures such as the nose cone separating from the body, or the platinum wire just vaporizing away or separating.
I think it's telling that several German carmakers (incl BMW) have gone to NGK for their OEM platinum plugs. There seems to be this mystique that a German manufacturer must mean better quality. Bosch makes some pretty good stuff for OEM. Their spark plugs and O2 sensors are notorious for failing spectacularly.
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If your old plugs were in good usable condition, you should not expect any difference upon installation of new Bosch Platinums.
The amount of hype and BS advertised about spark plugs is mind numbing.
John
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