Condensation in my gas tank

My 06 V6 Sonata sputtered upon fire-up this morning. I turned off the ignition, turned off the defrost / blower and the radio. Tried it again, and it did it again...until I tapped the accelerator, which got
the engine humming in no time.
There was very little gas in the tank at the time. I live in Washington State...and it's been real wet here and cold. I'm thinking water in the tank ?
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People used to add drygas to absorb moisture. Now that gasoline is 10 percent ethanol (drygas was usually isopropal alcohol) it is no longer needed. Just fill your tank and don't worry about it.
---MIKE---

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Yabahoobs wrote:

Old New England trick for this was to always fill the tank completely when adding gasoline. I guess that filling up more often might help too.
How well this works these days, I can't say.
Richard
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Water in the gas is a possibility, but there are many others as well. If the problem is reproducible, the dealer should be able to narrow the potential causes. With the dealer's scan tool, the technician can monitor which cylinders are misfiring. If all or most are misfiring, the implication is that there's a fuel issue. Whereas if it's one or two, then we could be looking at ignition, wiring, or mechanical issues, but since the offending cylinder is identified, there's less to check.
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