High performance pursuit cars?

In the early to mid 90s, the TX DPS (highway patrol, etc) had about 3
dozen seriously warmed up Camaroes and about 18 'Stangs, to be used in
high speed pursuits. Apparently they were rather successful in the
immediate areas were they were deployed.
Have any other states done the same? The Austin PD has several
"stealth" Magnums, but they admit that the cars really aren't capable
of running down a car that leaveds the freeways, ie MoPac and I35.
TXDPS has been drooling over the GT 500, but they have to convince a
legislature that is several billion short to buy them 3 or 4 dozen.
Reply to
Dillon Pyron
That will never happen and would be a huge waste of funds. A stock GT could be easily enhanced past the GT500 for far less money. I have less than 35k in my 05 and it is laying down 504 rwhp safely. With govt discounts and such this should easily be beaten.
Reply to
RM v2.0
Currently in Minnesota, some of the State troopers are driving unmarked Dodge Chargers in a variety of colors. If I may reminisce ... In the 80s, troopers in MN and Wisc were driving black, unmarked Mustang 5.0s, and almost everyone knew it. It was amazing how courteous other drivers were to me when I drove my black 84 5.0 Capri. My Capri is underpowered by today's standards, but, damn, it's still fun to drive! :-) Dick in MN
Reply to
dickr2
At one time the IL state trooper were running '94-'98 mustangs... then a rumor started circulating that all the state trooper mustangs had the same first two letters on their plate as mine. For awhile occasionally I would encounter other drivers who would treat me as they would a traffic cop.
Reply to
Brent
Thus spake "RM v2.0" :
But cops won't do any mods besides lights & sirens. Most of the departments around here send the cars to the dealer for anything beyond an oil change.
Oh, the APD is driving Chargers, not Magnums. But those are still crap if you have to actually steer them at speed.
When we lived in Germany in the late 60s the Dutch "pursuit squadron" drove 911s. Of course, given the size of the country (about the same as Harris County) they only needed 10 or 12. Why a "pursuit squadron" I don't know. Maybe to have cool cars to drive.
Reply to
Dillon Pyron
Dillon Pyron wrote in
Only in a socialist country where they take 70% of your income in taxes could cops afford cars like that. Anyone remember the story of the guy in the 1980's (in East Germany I think) who kept outrunning the cops using a white Porsche? Not a good thing to do in the place like that.
Reply to
Rich
Beats NY in the late 60s when they had these UGLY two tone puke green and orange or some such sedans with two whip antenna (one on each rear corner of the bumper. Like NOBODY knew they were cops! LOL
California had their 5.0s. They also had the "interceptors" back in the 60s... which were nothing but, essentially, a street legal funny car. And, they have used some Audi or SAAB sedans in gold or white. They were assigned to the truck inspection stations, but were fully authorized to perform routine patrol activities. Europe has had a mix of Lambros, Porches, etc.
Just like Checker did for taxi cabs, law enforcement probably needs a company which can turn out a specialty vehicle which can handle the speed, and still have room to haul a prisoner.
Is it worth it to have specialized vehicles? Probably not. The vast majority of "violators" vehicles are not much compared to cop cars. And, in all my years in law enforcement, I never went after a car that could outrun my radio.
Reply to
D E Willson
Not only in a socialist country....
Remember those famous California Highway Patrol cars? The state paid a grand total of around $4,000 each. Ford Motors Company wrote off the balance to "advertising". Did they lie about that? NO! Sales took off like an SR-71 Blackbird crossing the Atlantic Ocean. The hot car crowd was saying, 'if they are good enough for the CHP, I want one!'
Reply to
D E Willson
Thus spake D E Willson :
In the mid 70s, Tyler, TX police had flourecent piss green cars with reflective stuff EVERYWHERE. Supposedly for safety reasons. Given the number of cars (police) that were t-boned in the early 70s, this made sense. Of course, the trend continued. Seems that Tyler drivers were just that stupid. Given that you had to drive 20+ miles to buy booze, I'm guessing that a lot of folks had worked through a 6 before they hit city limits.
Addison, TX bought a dozen Volvos of some sort or another around 1980. Of course, this was a town (not city, distinction in Texas) that had an average income four times the average in Dallas (all around them).
I'll build an Econoline with a blown SOHC. Straight line you're toast, so take the first right. :-)
Speed of sound vs speed of light. 300Km/sec always wins.
or
E=mC2 (that's a squared), It's not just a good idea, it's the law.
Reply to
Dillon Pyron
Went to Combat School in Texas, enroute to Vietnam. With the weekend off, four of us cruised down to Corpus Christi and the beach. Then it was enroute back to San Antonia when one of us spotted a sign for Loredo. Blew the day in Nuevo Loredo. Bought a few things. Made in back across with a pint tucked under my jacked in the small of my back. Bent over to get in the car and it popped out and shattered on the street. Off we went again. Stopped at some no place place and bought a couple of 6's. Fliying doen the road we crested a hill and right there.... I mean RIGHT THERE.... was a TX Statie going the opposing direction. Saw his tail lights flash as we came down the opposite side and cans flew out the window. Right down the road was a 4 way intersection with a gas station on the right. In we pulled behind the station. Peering around the corner we saw the bear stop in the middle of the 4 way and saw him looking around. He then hung a left turn and sped off. In short order, we were back on the road, and got us back to the safety of Camp B.
Yep. In Texas, you can have an arsenal in your back window, under the seat, etc.... but do NOT pop a top!!! > >> >>California had their 5.0s. They also had the "interceptors" back in >>the 60s... which were nothing but, essentially, a street legal funny >>car. And, they have used some Audi or SAAB sedans in gold or white. >>They were assigned to the truck inspection stations, but were fully >>authorized to perform routine patrol activities. Europe has had a mix >>of Lambros, Porches, etc. > >Addison, TX bought a dozen Volvos of some sort or another around 1980. >Of course, this was a town (not city, distinction in Texas) that had >an average income four times the average in Dallas (all around them). > >> >>Just like Checker did for taxi cabs, law enforcement probably needs a >>company which can turn out a specialty vehicle which can handle the >>speed, and still have room to haul a prisoner. > >I'll build an Econoline with a blown SOHC. Straight line you're >toast, so take the first right. :-) > >> >>Is it worth it to have specialized vehicles? Probably not. The vast >>majority of "violators" vehicles are not much compared to cop cars. >>And, in all my years in law enforcement, I never went after a car that >>could outrun my radio. > >Speed of sound vs speed of light. 300Km/sec always wins. > >or > >E=mC2 (that's a squared), It's not just a good idea, it's the law.
Reply to
D E Willson
Thus spake D E Willson :
Thanks.
Actually, they didn't enact the "open container" law until about 6 or 4 years ago. However, it's pretty ugly. If you have a dead dry, hotter than hell beer bottle in the back seat, you're screwed. For a little while there was a company that sold vinyl wrappers that you could put on your can that looked like various soda brands. Went out of business when Coke jumped down their throats. You'd still be screwed if you were pulled over, but at least you could hold a cool one and drive.
On Friday and Saturday nights if there's an accident that results in a death, "police suspect that alcohol was involved" is almost always the last line in the (very small) news article.
Reply to
Dillon Pyron
Thanks are not necessary, but are appreciated. It was my pleasure to serve my country and the citizens thereof.
Not sure what the law was in 1968, but, it could be a case of our car having out of state plates.
I think that's pretty common nation wide.
Reply to
D E Willson

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