Battery question for 2009 Altima

I had an experience where the battery in my Altima failed, and while in
the process of determining whether the battery is just had it, or
whether there is a load on the thing, the mechanic put an ammeter in the
circuit between the battery positive terminal and the clamp.
He measured 0.15 Amps flowing, when the car was shut off, the lights
were off, and there should have been no load except the electronic stuff
you cannot shut off.
He thought that might have been a little high. Does anyone have any
experience with that parameter?
Thanks ever so much,
S.
Reply to
Sebastian Tombs
On 1/7/11 11:14 PM, in article
'09? Why are you not taking it to the dealer. Even if its just a bad battery, this is a warranty issue.
Reply to
E. Meyer
In article ,
I have been driving it. I have over 75 thousand km on it, and there ain't no more warranty on it. Not to mention that the nearest dealer is about 3 hours away from where I live....
So I can assume you don't know the answer to myu question, right?
S.
Reply to
Sebastian Tombs
While that draw seems a little high keep in mind that car batteries are normally rated in hundreds of amp hours. .15 amp is 3.6 amp hours per day. The time to drain your battery at 3.6 amp hours per day would be measured in a few months
Reply to
Ray
That is correct, but that assumes a good battery. With these VRLA batteries, the thing could be on its last legs - they are rated officially at 10 years, but anything over 5 years is a miracle, and less than 5 is not unknown...
It is interesting that you also think the draw is a little high. Maybe I need to do something about checking for something in the car - but there are only two power points, and I think the wiring should last a little longer before it starts giving problems?
HR. ============= In article ,
Reply to
Sebastian Tombs
On 1/8/11 11:14 AM, in article
The battery is still guaranteed. Did you even read the warranty?
Hell, if you've already got 75,000 on it, throw it away.
It always amazes me all these people who claim to have bought their car from a dealer 3 hours away. How is that even possible. Where do you live? Alaska?
Reply to
E. Meyer
In article ,
I don't know where you live, and probably more to the point, you don't know where the Hell I live.
North America is a big damned continent, and the majority of the population - but not all of it - is along the two sea coasts. I don't know - something to do with oceans and trading and stuff like that. Or maybe just history and settlements. What with 75 thousand km in about 1.5 years, I have a pretty good idea just how big this damned continent is, you can be sure.
Some of us live on the east side of the Rockies, where there are a few people and fewer big cities where a Nissan dealer would want to locate. I mean, if he wanted to sell a lot of cars, so he could eat steak regularly. And actually, transportation infrastructure is not bad throughout the country - stuff DOES move, and truckers like that to happen.
And if you happen to have a box of crayons, maybe you could explain to me, and draw some pretty pictures, and explain to me how the load on the battery has exactly Sweet Bugger All to do with the battery? Pro-rated over 5 years or not?
Or what?
S.
Reply to
Sebastian Tombs
.15 amps is 1/10th and a little bit. This isn't that unusual with this vehicle. If you mechanic is any kind of a mechanic, he would put a load tester on the battery to check the available power for starting.
75,000 Km over how much time....how many starts,,,,these are things to figure out. I would just replace the pattery, check to make sure there is a charge coming from the alternator (over 13V, less than 15v)
Reply to
thisguy
In article ,
If I am a jerk, you are a shithead. If you don't know the answer, shut your God Damned mouth and go jerk off somewhere else. If you knew the answer, you would have given it.
Dreck like you are the bane of the worker bees of society.
Many happy returns, shit for brains.
Reply to
Henry Rowbottom

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