Map Update

Are they serious?
I just got notification that a map update is available for my 2018 Outback. That is fine, great even, but then I started looking at the fine print
scattered here and there (on their download app and on the download portal) and find that "Caution: This update will delete some of your radio presets. Please take note of your presets before proceeding so you can reprogram them after the update." Really, it will delete _some_ presets? Which ones? Just radio or will all of my nav stuff disappear too? Those are presets in my book. Then on the instructions for the install they tell me in tiny type on a poor-quality graphic: "This update may take up to 60 minutes to complete. Please keep your vehicle running (not Accessory mode) throughout the entire installation." Is this even realistic?
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John McGaw wrote:

Update notice how? Via e-mail? How'd they get your e-mail address? If e-mail, did you look at the headers and the HTML code to make sure it came from Subaru and the links point to Subaru?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUOW5Je3TgI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BkzfG4MM6mk
https://www.dyersubaru.com/updating-your-subaru-navigation-system.htm http://www.subarumapupdates.com.au/pdf/HEREUpdate-Instructions.pdf
Those authors show a flash memory card gets removed and that is to where you copy the downloaded map update. Obviously your car doesn't need to be running because you won't even be at your car while writing new data onto the flash card when at your computer (Windows or iOS).
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On 8/23/2018 3:45 PM, VanguardLH wrote:

Yes. The notification is legit. If one wants the updates it is necessary to go to Subaru's website and sign up and then, when an update applicable to your VIN comes up, their computer sends an email to tell you about it.
Current headunits are nothing like what is shown in the links you provided: right now it is done via a USB flash drive -- no little door to open and card to extract. In many ways the old way might be superior assuming that the memory contents that the system uses is what is on the micro-SD so it would be swap-n-go. The new system keeps its data internally and updating involves transferring files from the flash drive to the internal permanent memory. A wild guess would be that this in preparation for over-the-air updates which is already built into the headunit but disabled in the current software release. Of course, if the present system is any example, they would require me to leave the car running in the garage for an hour or more for the updated to suck the data from my home's wi-fi.
In any case, I got the data downloaded and successfully loaded onto a usb flash drive in case I ever get motivated enough to install it.
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On 8/23/2018 4:06 PM, John McGaw wrote:

Googling around someone said it would cost him $290 to subscribe to 3 years of updates. I paid maybe $125 for a Garmin Nuvi gps with lifetime map updates a few years ago. On line it can take a half hour to download.
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Frank wrote:

From what I hear, Subaru's maps are from HERE Maps. Nokia acquired HERE which was acquired later by a consortium of German auto makers. From https://www.here.com/en/products-services/map-content/here-map-data , looks like Garmin uses HERE's maps, too. Microsoft uses HERE to power their Bing Maps.
I have an Android smartphone with the Google Maps, HERE [WeGo], and Waze navigation apps. Google Maps is the most accurate, up to date, and with most POI (points of interest) but offline maps are more usable in the HERE app. All of those Android nav apps are free and updated frequently. In my latest car (2018), I can link my smartphone to the head unit in the car via Bluetooth. In my oldie (2002), I use an FM/Bluetooth transceiver to link my smartphone to my car's radio. Although I have the Waze app, I just haven't felt motivated to use it much. The point is that I can have many different mapping apps with different characteristics, not stuck with just one.
Yes, there is the cost of the smartphone; however, I'd have one whether I owned a car or not and whether the car had a head unit or not. So that's a cost that would exist no matter what the car has or not. Arguing the cost of the smartphone obviates the zero price for the map apps is like arguing the cost of Windows obviates freeware being free.
I don't have to wait a year, or more, for map updates. I can have multiple apps to use the one whose characteristics match the task at hand. I don't have to pay for the maps. The smartphone isn't constrained to the location of the car. Head units are so archaic that they're a morose joke.
The only time it has taken over an hour to update the [offline] maps is when I select a group of countries with all their state and city maps that aggregate to a huge download. I don't have to be running my car the entire time for the download and update. I don't lose radio stations in the car. I don't lose any settings in the smartphone.
With an ODB2 plug-in transceiver scan tool (ODBLink MX) to communicate with the ECU along with matching apps (OBDlink and Torque Lite) on my smartphone, I get a hell of lot more information about my car than any head unit will tell me.
Yes, I need a holder for the smartphone. Since I never listen to the car's radio, I could just slap some velcro on the head unit's display on which to stick the smartphone. There are lots of phone holder's to match your preference. In one car, a cup holder in the console suffices. In another, a holder that fits into the CD slot works well. I spent maybe about $10 for the phone holder which is a hell of lot cheaper than subscribing to anyone's maps, including Subaru.
You could argue the smartphone's display is smaller than the display for the head unit. My LG V20 is large enough that I can see the map app just fine. If you need a bigger screen but still want something far more robust than a head unit, get a tablet and velcro it over the head unit.
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On 8/24/2018 8:32 PM, VanguardLH wrote:

I'm not up to date on all the electronics in cars today and first heard for a friend with a gps in his Rav4 that map updates cost $200 and it was done at the dealer.
I also know smartphones have cut into the gps market. I don't have one myself but have a flip Tracfone and do have it blue toothed to my 2016 Forester. My Garmin Nuvi gps might be 5 years old and I might use it a couple of times per year but there is no cost to maintain it. Also seldom use the phone and it only costs me $150 for two years.
It is nice to have all the latest bells and whistles but they come at a big price.
The friend with the Rav4 was also teaching trade school classes part time and tells me that the younger crowd often trades in a car to keep up with the newest electronics.
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I use an iPad mini, mostly with CoPilot GPS, but sometimes just with Google Maps. On both, I use voice directions, so I don't even need to see the screen. (I leave the iPad lying on the passengr seat.) Google Maps will even alert me to traffic problems ahead and suggest a different route if possible. CoPilot GPS gives me complete online apps for the U.S. and Canada, and my iPad is the GPS/cellular model, so I can use CoPilot even when I'm out of cell range.
Anyway, different strokes for different folks, but I didn't want to pay thousands of dollars to get a factory nav system in my Outback, and after I realized how useful my iPad could be, I stopped investigating after- market nav systems. As Vanguard noted, a nav system that uses a mobile device means that I get frequent free updates and can always add a new nav program if I'm dissatisfied with the existing ones.
Patty
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On 8/25/2018 1:34 PM, Patty Winter wrote:

This just came up on my facebook page:
https://www.consumerreports.org/buying-a-car/must-have-car-features/
They advise not buying a built in gps.
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On 8/26/18 8:06 AM, Frank wrote:

I agree- but unfortunately the Nav system is usually bundled with a package of safety and convenience features that you actually want. Also, it's standard equipment on many cars in the middle and upper trim lines.
--
The fastest way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.

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On 8/26/2018 8:22 AM, Wade Garrett wrote:

I'm amazed that people seemed to get so worked up about my post which was basically there to complain about/ lightly mock Subaru's map upgrade procedures. Lighten up folks! If you want to use your phone or a separate GPS or intuition or maps and your old boy scout compass to navigate then that is fine. You can read the moss on the trees for all it matters. My car happened to come with the navigation system included in the trim level I wanted so it is there and it works beautifully. If I was inclined to use my Android phone to navigate then I could switch on Android Auto and have the phone function through the 8" touchscreen in the car but I find it easier to use what is built in natively.
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On 8/26/2018 9:27 AM, John McGaw wrote:

I think I mentioned here before that my son had the system in his BMW years ago. It was great to use but broke down. It was repaired under warranty and the dealer said that he was lucky it was still warranted as repair would have cost him $3,000.
I do not go for all the bells and whistles but am glad to hear the all Subaru 2019 models will contain the eyesight system. Consumer reports does like these things.
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[extraneous quotage removed]

John, I didn't see anyone getting "worked up" or dissing your choice. As Usenet threads are wont to do, this one drifted onto other options for navigation.
I found it interesting that Consumer Reports is advising the use of a mobile device instead of a built-in system. In my case, I would have had to pay an extra $3,000-$4,000 (I forget the actual amount) to get a nav system in my Outback, because it was bundled with a sunroof. Instead, I got a nice nav system for free, since I already owned an iPad. (I did later pay $9.95 for voice capability on CoPilot GPS.) As I said, different strokes for different folks. Your choice works well for you, and that's great.
Patty
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