Parking brake adjustment

2002 Subaru Legacy wagon 4-wheel disc brakes
Parking brake won't hold the car on my slanted driveway even at full extension. Need to tighten it up. Don't like using the pawl in the
automatic transmission to hold the car in place.
This has discs for all wheels; however, are the parking brakes the old fashioned shoes? I've seen video showing a plug in the brake housing and a star screw to adjust the parking shoes in the back. That's one way to adjust the parking brake if that's how they work in my car but I can see a problem in getting matched settings on both rear wheels. From http://tinyurl.com/y7rbjfb5 , looks like my car has shoes for parking brakes.
The other method is to get the adjusting nut on the parking brake mechanism under the center console. At first, I thought I was going to have to remove the center console. No adjusting nut in front of the parking brake lever seen through the rubber flap. Just the switch there for the Parking Brake dash indicator. Found the nut on the backside of the lever through the split rubber cover.
It took something like 5 full turns to get the parking brake to start to hold the car at the recommended 8 clicks. Takes 11 clicks to hold the car on an incline. In fact, I had to switch from a regular 10mm socket to a deep well socket due to the nut having to travel down the bolt so far. I put the car in neutral to test the hold of the parking brake on an incline. I then put the car on the level car port in neutral and could easily move the car so it doesn't seem the parking brake is dragging despite having to rotate the adjustment nut so many turns.
With so many full turns (~5) of the adjustment nut on the parking brake lever to get the parking brakes to hold the car on an incline, does this mean the shoes need to get replaced? Or do the star screws need adjusting (requiring jacking up the car) and then readjust the parking break travel? I've had the car inspected but I suppose they can just see the pads and not the parking brake shoes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, July 9, 2017 at 3:13:41 PM UTC-10, VanguardLH wrote:

Loosen the parking brake adjustment nut to it's original setting then adjus t the star wheel. Tighten the star wheel until it makes contact. Loosen it a few clicks. Adjust the parking lever cable and test on an incline. If it holds, you're done. If you can't adjust it properly at that lever, replace the parking brake cables.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/9/17 9:13 PM, VanguardLH wrote:

Chock a wheel with a brick instead of using the AT parking pawl to hold it! Otherwise you'll be looking at a major transmission repair soon enough...
--
I think of myself as a man's man. I like my whiskey neat, my steaks
rare, and my Pop-Tarts untoasted.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wade Garrett wrote:

I'd rather use the parking brake which has now been adjusted to hold the car on an incline.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, July 10, 2017 at 5:15:24 AM UTC-10, Wade Garrett wrote:

Oddly enough, that's how Subaru's Hill Holder technology works. Two bricks and some string is all it takes. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, July 9, 2017 at 8:13:41 PM UTC-5, VanguardLH wrote:

I adjusted mine at the rear wheels.
1. pull p-brake handle to the FIRST click 2. chock front wheels, leave trans in neutral 3. lift rear of car and place jack stands (I used the center diff, floor jack - you could do one side at a time if needed) 4. pull the oval rubber plug from the back plate 5. Use a flat blade screwdriver and lever/push the 'star' wheel UPWARDS (both sides tighten with upwards movement) 6. Tighten until the wheel has a lot of drag when you try to turn it by hand 7. do the other side the same way
This has worked for both my '03 H6 OBW and my '06 WRX Wagon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/9/2017 9:13 PM, VanguardLH wrote:

Yup, all rear disks are really combination disk/drum brakes, with the drums being used for parking brake duties.
    Yousuf Khan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yousuf Khan wrote:

Can't figure out the shoes would've worn to require a readjustment of the cable. Maybe someone before my use of the car was driving with the parking brake on for a long time.
For the next car shop work on the car, I'll have them check the shoes to see if they need replacing. Whether replaced or not, I'll see if they agree to readjust the cable so the star wheel is used more than the nut on the lever handle. I had to tighten the nut a lot so there is likely little adjustment remaining.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, July 12, 2017 at 10:59:03 AM UTC-10, VanguardLH wrote:

Thee's no reason to expect any wear on the parking brake shoe. Any looseness is going to be the result of a stretched cable. You should check the star wheel adjustment first to make sure they've been set properly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, July 12, 2017 at 7:33:17 AM UTC-10, Yousuf Khan wrote:

I've never had a rear drum/disk brake setup. I used to have a Fiat with disk brakes in the rear. These were the first cars that used a disk parking brake. The system was used for decades. I assume companies paid Fiat to use their system.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.