Lube for hood and rear gate latches?

Is white lithium spray lube be okay on the hood and rear gate/door latch mechanisms or should I use something else? Don't have a grease gun so a
sprayed lube is needed. If not lithium, would moly spray (chain lube) be okay?
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On 7/6/2017 8:30 PM, VanguardLH wrote:

I would not hesitate to use spray lithium lube for the actual mechanisms. I've always used lithium grease for the 'contact' portions of latches, being careful to wipe off excess which has spread to the wrong locations.
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I use "fluid film" on all latches and hinges.
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clare wrote:

Never heard of fluid film. I'm now reading the online articles now at:
https://www.google.com/search?q=fluid%20film
Says something about lanolin or wool wax. Isn't that soap? It's been around a long time but this is the first I've heard of it.
http://www.fluid-film.com/retail-locations/
Looks like I can get it at Oreilly's or AutoZone (but not at all their stores). Ooof, $12 a 12oz can. One thing that I've not liked about lithium lube is that it doesn't penetrate, just coat where the spray hits.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICPiDOyA4T4

Cool!
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On 7/8/2017 6:29 PM, VanguardLH wrote:

You can see components and rough composition from their safety data sheet:
http://www.fluid-film.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/SDS_Aerosol.pdf
Petroleum based and calcium sulfonate salt could be considered a surfactant. I see similarities to much cheaper WD-40:
https://wd40.com/files/pdf/msds-wd482671453.pdf
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Frank wrote:

I know that WD-40 will attract dust and dirt. Fluid Film has paraffin (wool wax). I've yet to see a candle that was coated with dust or dirt (well, to the same extent as something coated with WD-40). Coat a metal plate with WD-40. Blow some lint (no static) at the plate. The lint sticks. Blow some non-static lint at a candle. No sticking. That's why you NEVER use WD-40 for lubricating a lock's cylinder and pins as it will get grimy.
From those 2 MSDS', I don't see those products are similar. I've actually used a candle to lube a screw going into wood. WD-40 wouldn't work for that at all. My small bottle of WD-40 rarely gets used.
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On 7/9/2017 4:08 PM, VanguardLH wrote:

I agree on locks but latches are different. I've used soap for wood screws.
I had an interesting experience once using teflon spray on a bicycle chain. Chain was much cleaner looking but after a few sprayings started to rust from lack of petroleum oil film.
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There ARE teflon/oil preparations that both lubricate and protect chains. Lanolin works good for both too.
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On 7/9/2017 6:11 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I now know. This was an old can of mold release I had left over from work I was doing molding resins. The lesson was to use something designed for that use.
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Parafin is NOT wool wax, and wool wax is NOT parafin - - - Wool wax is LANOLIN.

Like I said - you really need to try the stuff. Where most can-jockeys would apply half a teaspoon of that AWFULL spray lithium grease, just a short squirt - less than 1/5 as much, will do the job.
It CAN be washed off- not good for where you need a heavy duty waterproof grease - but it maks latches and hinges work like silk.
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clare wrote:

Read their MSDS for Fluid Film to which Frank provided a URL link. That says paraffin. Read their web site and they mention lanolin (wool wax). So which is it?
I don't know why but kerosene is also referred to as paraffin. Paraffin wax is used as a lubricant.
http://www.lubegard.com/pdfs/what_is_the_difference_in_atf_base_stocks.pdf "Paraffinic oils are prepared by solvent separation techniques from parafinic crude oil, which give good yield of high viscosity index stocks containing a lot of wax."
The company says their product has lanolin (wool wax). Their MSDS does not list lanolin or wool wax, just "hydrotreated heavy paraffinic".

I thought it was clear that I was interested in the stuff but the price seems a bit high for wax lube. Good and High Priced don't necessary have to go hand in hand.

Hmm, then why do they show it in the video used as an undercoating on cars? The video (by the company) shows them using it on tires, suspension parts under the car, battery terminals,
Why would I use it on a hood latch which is going to get pelted with high-speed rain when driving or splash ups from the road? The hood latch is not sealed (else I couldn't lube it, either). The door hinges shouldn't get pelted with rain or road splash so okay there but hood hinge seems rather exposed for anything that would wash away. That's why I got a can of white (thicker) lithium spray lube because it is waterproof. That's the lube I've seen most often recommended for the hood latch. There's the thicker marine lithium lube (paste) but there wasn't any at the store when I was there and I figure I can use the squirt can of white lithium each year for many years.
However, there is still some of the old grease in the hood latch mechanism. I'm averse to using WD-40 but seen it recommended for cleaning out the old grease, dirt, and grime and then apply the white lithium lube. If the objective is to get rid of all the old grease and grime, seems brake fluid spray or PB Blaster would work better. Then follow with the waterproof white lithium grease.
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The MSDS ONLY lists components that are known to be harmfull They are NOT a complete list of ingredients.

Good and low priced is a lot more rare. The stuff is good. Good costs money Get used to it. I've spent half my life working with cars and machines

It is EXCELLENT for storage, and protecting enclosed areas. Beinf LANOLIN, in large part - ot is SAFE on tires and rubber bushings, which are compromised by petroloum based oils - and vegetable oils go rancid.

Hey, it's your funeral. The stuff WORKS. That's why I use it and recommend it.

Wash ot out with any grease solvent you want. Use brake fluid and then repaint your car - I don't care. Kero works good. WD40 is expensive Kero. Whote lothium grease hardens. I won't use it any more - too much time spent getting it removed when it goes bad. You can use whatever you want - the question was asked, what to use. I recommended a product and gave reasons and experience.
Up to you - and all other readers.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've got the Fluid Film on my shopping list for when I happen to be shopping and am near a car store that carries it. I take it that I'll still have to clean out the old grease before applying this stuff.
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Definitely a good idea, particularly if you have a wad of hardened lithium grease in there - - -
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clare wrote:

I don't think this car ever got maintenanced before I got it unless something broke and had to get fixed. I'm spending lots for lots of maintenance probably never done before. It's probably the original grease in the hood and rear gate/door latches. Just see grease, no white stuff (lithium).
What's good for cleaning out the old grease? PB Blaster?
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WD 40 is cheaper and closer to pure kero. I'd just use Varsol in a squirt can, some rads, and compressed air, myself.
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There isn't any comparison to the generic WD40 - or any of their specialty products. You can't really rt5ell much from the MSDS (The only similarityis it is a penetrating lubricant (well, at least fluid film is - seems to be some disagreement about WD40), it is available both in bulk and spray cans, and it has a distinctive odour (not anything CLOSE to being similar though)
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On 7/9/2017 6:05 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The hydrocarbons are different and WD40 does not disclose the surfactant. When I first looked it up I wondered if it were silicone based. Yes formulations make a difference but there are a lot of similarities. I would not want to spray either into a lock.
I had a neighbor that spent his career in the lab formulating agricultural products. More work to this than you might think to get the chemical to work right. I had another whose whole career was inventing new herbicides. He only invented one but it made millions but had to be pulled off the market.
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This stuff will knock your dox off. anyone who has been using that LOUSY sprat Lithium Lubti-Plate will pitch it to the back of the shop, where it will stay 'till it's time to clean the shop. At's not cheap at $12 a can - but it lasts, and lasts - I won't lie and say it lasts for ever because I likely mptied my first can over 10 years ago - and I've empties a few since. Bought my last can at TSC for $10 and change on sale. (Canadian)
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