Straightening an Aluminum wheel



I sense vigorous backing-and-filling going on here. You /don't/ know, and won't admit it.
You originally said, "Buy snow tires. 70% of winter accidents are due to cars not using snow tires. Radials are only good to about 7 above zero celcius (40ish F)."
You seem to have the impression that "radials" are summer or all-season tires, which implies that you do not know what the term means.
--
Tegger


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Now you're making serious assumptions. I chose not to answer a question that wasn't worded in context in any case. The meaning of the word radial alone has a very different meaning than radial tire.

Then you apparently didn't read my other post about the naming conventions around here. Besides the radial snow tires on that site look marketly different than the one I see here. The treads were far less pronuonced for one.
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fred wrote:

is this what you're talking about?
http://www.stausaonline.com/bias-ply-passenger/traxion-70-tires.html
I haven't seen any of those in 15 years or more. I don't particularly miss 'em either. Loud and rumbly...
nate
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When I bought my '76 Dodge Coronet (used), the previous owner had installed bias-ply tires, probably to save money. They were awful. A replacement with radials brought an instant and obvious improvement in straight-ahead stability and in cornering quietness.
However, I neglected to replace the bias-ply that was on the spare wheel, so the next time I got a flat, I discovered very emphatically why they always told you not to mix radials and bias-plys on the same axle.
--
Tegger


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>

Yes, that's more what they look like up here.

Snow, hard packed even isn't exactly known for transmitting sound very well. If there's no snow or ice on the road, you don't need snow tires. However here, anywhere but the major roads is covered in a layer of it for most of the winter.
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fred wrote:

yep, I remember living up north and roads simply were packed snow. Around here more often it's just slushy, the only reason you need snow tires is so that you can get around on those few days when there is actual snow on the ground - maybe a week or so out of the year. Unfortunately, you don't know when those days are going to be so the snow tires stay on december through march. The newer "winter tires" do me fine although I wouldn't try getting through a winter without them (Porsche 944, no all-season tires available to fit it anymore even if I wanted to try it.)
nate
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I lived in Martinsville,Indiana for a year in 1947 and Bozeman,Montana for about six months in 1956 and Salina,Kansas for a few months in 1957 (in the Summertime) and at Scott Air Force Base,Illinois (when I was in the Army) for about ten months in 1963.
I never could get used to that freezing cold weather and slipping and sliding on those icey sidewalks and my fingers and toes feeling like Birdseye frozen peas.Suppose to get up to 71 degrees here tomorrow. cuhulin
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"Radial" simply means that the fabric belts that make up the tire's carcass are not wound on an angle the way they are in the older bias-ply design. Instead they are wound straight from one bead to the other, as though they were "radiating" outwards from the tire's centerline.
The construction of the carcass has nothing to do with the tread design or the tire's intended weather use. Automotive road-going winter tires in Canada are identical to winter tires sold elsewhere in the world, and ALL are of radial construction.
Differentiating between radial and non-radial was important up to about the mid-'80s, when it was still possible to purchase either kind, and there were many vehicles still on the road with suspensions designed for bias-ply tires.
When you compare tires on a Website, make sure you're comparing snow to snow, and ice to ice. Both are winter tires, but they have slightly different intended uses and slightly different tread architectures.
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Tegger wrote:

Spokes do not cross: http://www.astounding.org.uk/ian/wheel/patterns.html
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Andrew Muzi
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september.org:

We're not talking about wheels.
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Tegger


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sid

Nope. Dunlop Winter Sport 195/65R15. Apparently sadly now discontinued in that size.
http://www.dunloptires.com/dunlop/display_tire.jsp?prodline=DUN+Winter+Sp ort+M3&mrktarea=Winter
They work great, BTW, although I do not live in a heavy snow area so I can't comment on deep loose snow traction. They work fine on slush and packed snow.
nate
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I'm not sure how you'd really quantify that, but they do make quite a difference. (So does having good remaining tread depth.)

Umm. There *is* a common recommendation that in snow country, at a time in the fall when you start seeing temperatures in the low single figures C, you should change to your winter tires, but the reasoning is that you don't want to get pantsed by the season's first big storm. (You don't want to change too early, or keep them on after the risk has passed in the spring, because those tread compounds wear very fast on warm dry roads.) I don't think that's meant as a statement that a decent all-season radial is no longer doing a good job at ambient temperatures of 7 /40 F.

A Tire Rack article in their "winter" series even states that (other factors being more or less apples-to-apples) the early radials were quickly noted for their superiority in winter. Anyway, the point is, if not truly moot, at least close to it in the US and probably other industrialized nations. Bias and bias belted tires are still made -- users include heavy trucks/buses, severe off-roading, certain kinds of racing, and correct-looking restoration of antique cars -- but radials have made great inroads in most of those areas and only the last one is really ironclad.
As for the original question, I'd do a web search and ask some of the places that specialize in repairing bent or broken alloy rims. It can be done (depending on the nature and severity of the damage) but it isn't a job for just anyone. You need a place that has skill and can look for hidden damage and true it up right.
--Joe
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Ad absurdum per aspera wrote:

I can recommend one (Ye Olde Wheel Shop in Elkridge) but as I posted long ago, if the wheel is still available new for less than $150 or so it'd probably be best to just buy a whole new wheel. Only reason to repair an alloy wheel is if it's a discontinued or very expensive wheel. You won't save any money by repairing an alloy wheel that is still available for a reasonable price, and you can't repair a wheel *better* than new.
nate
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Depends where you live. In my area we generally get our first snowfall in late November or early December, so most people have their snows on by the middle of November. The rest end up stuck on a hill or in the ditch.
We can take them off early-mid April.
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In Quebec, you are now required by law to have snow tires on your car during the winter BTW.
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A heck of a lot of winter clothing thingys are sold in Miami clothing stores, because some people from Europe and other countries plan on heading up North after touring around in Miami.
Heh, a married Irish woman who lives in Bognor Regis,England, (she and meself have been friends since around the year of 2000) she and her hubby visited Disneyworld and Universal City near Orlando a few years ago in November.She was supprised it can get cold in Florida.She went to a store and bought a sweater. cuhulin
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote in

I found that out the first time I stepped into the gulf during march break one year in Clearwater. "What's the point?" I thought. This is worse than Peggy's Cove's tidal pool. At least there it was a confortable air temperature.
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Ad absurdum per aspera wrote:

Actually most heavy trucks and buses use radials. Have been since the late 80's. You have to look at tires from the 70's to find bias plies any longer.
severe off-roading, certain kinds

Actually you can also get the correct looking tires in radial construction, and that is actually the main reason you can get the correct ones. The people wanted the better radial tire construction but also wanted correct looking tires.
-- but

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Steve W.

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Accident

no buddy said I couldn`t get them, I was pointing out there are almost no bias ply tires any more. KB
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THUNDERSNAKE #9

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about 15 years ago I picked up an old Schwinn cruiser from the mid-50s. It had the original (dry rotted) tires on them. I wonder if they were bias-ply.
Otherwise, I don't think i've seen nor even heard anyone say "snow tires" in about 15 years, and that includes the last 8 years that I've lived in Wisconsin.
*shrug*
-J
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