Toyota vs aftermarket O2 sensor?

Can someone tell me what are the differences between an OEM O2 sensor and a Universal one, made by Bosch for example? Same for OEM plugs versus Bosch ones?
Cheers
JP
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JP wrote:

Yes ... but ... you COULD make use of GOOGLE or Yahoo search engines.
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- Philip @ Maximum Torque RPM



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No harm in asking, that is what this group is FOR. The major difference is the price. And you might have to splice the connector on yourself.
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Different sensors will give a different voltage for a given O2 concentration. A Toyota vehicle is programmed for the voltages from a Toyota sensor, not a BMW sensor. Now if there's a "universal" O2/voltage relationship, then any sensor would work. However in the auto industry, "universal" is a bad word.

a
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The only thing that stops a Zirconia sensor being universal is the connection to the car and how many wires they used.
The most common sensor is Zirconium. As they work like a battery the voltage is fixed. No one short of God can change the voltage produced and I doubt he has made any interventions to the laws of physics on behalf of any car maker. When O2 is not present it generates voltage like a good fully charged battery, O2 in the exhaust stops it producing voltage just like a flat battery. Just like putting a zinc and copper strip in a lemon, put them in get a voltage dry it out no volts. Whatever manufacturing process is used the difference between any two makers sensors (OEM or aftermarket) is not enough to change the engines running. Whatever they tell or show you, no one using Zirconia sensors uses the transient response, the ECU simply uses more than 0.45v to detect rich mixture and less than 0.45v to detect weak.
Considering the cost and profit on 02 sensors and the size of the aftermarket any demo by an OEM that their expensively repackaged Bosch or NTK sensor is better than a aftermarket Bosch or NTK sensor is highly suspect. I could fudge such a demo in any number of ways such that an autoshop technician on a training day wouldn't have a clue that they had come to see a sales pitch for O2 sensors. (If you have ever had a free 'training' day then it's a 100% certainty that it was all sales pitch or for legal reasons) You would need a degree in physics or electronics and would have to strip my demo kit down - including the voltage supplies for the heaters, oscilloscopes, voltmeters and leads.
-- Peter Hill Spamtrap reply domain as per NNTP-Posting-Host in header Can of worms - what every fisherman wants. Can of worms - what every PC owner gets!
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Whatever they tell or show you, no one using

Peter, Thanks for the explanation. Do you have an opinion about replacement intervals for O2 sensors, assuming no silicone based sealant contaminants, no carbon coating from over rich condition, just normal mileage accumulating on an engine in good condition?
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snipped-for-privacy@nbnet.nb.ca says...

Universal ones are not heated, so if it works at all it won't work very well until the exhuast heats up.
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So, with a Universal O2 sensor, gas consumption would go up, right?
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I put a universal heated one on my dads beemer when we did the gas conversion kit?
J

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says...

If it was a heated aftermarker sensor I don't imagine it was much cheaper than a Toyota factory one.
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£45 UK, as opposed to the beemer £94+VAT. No idea about toyota prices TBH.
Theres something to be said for getting the dealer part tho - might cost more but at least you know it runs as it is meant to. Unless you are willing to spend alot of time researching.
J

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says...

As I recall when I needed one the single wire unheated aftermarket was $84 Cnd., the Toyota was $136. I would imagine a heated aftermarket would be somewhere in between but I couldn't find one at the time.
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At times, the original part will actually be cheaper than say a Purolator or Blue Streak or some other AM. I do admit that is not usually the case. At times the original part price difference may be only 10 percent higher or it may be 1000 percent.
For the most part, I stick to the AM, however there are times it is much less hassle to get the original, which fits (usually) without any "modifications."
Of course the day Toyota wanted $67 USD for an "exact fit" positive battery cable, I paid $6 at the local NAPA store and got one that unfortunately was six inches too long ;>0.
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On 18 Apr 2004 09:34:13 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@mailcity.com (Tim J. Johson) wrote:

It's a trade-off, I use both - and check factory and aftermarket on most things before making the decision. The aftermarket part might be 10% of the OE part price, but if you have to spend an hour or two making it fit the AM part isn't much of a deal after all. On the oxygen sensors, I wouldn't bother with AM unless there was a huge price difference.
Sometimes it's worth paying the premium for OE parts to get an installation that looks factory - things like fog light or cargo light switches that match the rest of the dashboard controls exactly.
Or the Diesel pickup throttle pedal and throttle pull control I put in my 88 Gasoline pickup - perfect for leaving the truck sitting parked with lots of power-hungry electrical accessories running, like a light bar, two-way radios... Pull the knob and dial up 1800 - 2000 RPM, and the alternator keeps cooking.

As long as you had a place to secure that six inches of slack without it rubbing on something hot or moving, there's nothing wrong with that at all. Six inches /short/, that's a problem.
--<< Bruce >>--
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Bruce L. Bergman, Woodland Hills (Los Angeles) CA - Desktop
Electrician for Westend Electric - CA726700
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Funny thing about those exact fit cables, ones the end rusts off it once, it no longer fits :)
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