A1 conversion to 86 octane

As you are all aware the price of fuel has increased! I am driving Rabbits 83 & 84 that require at least 89 octane minimum. Is there anyway to modify
the A1 engines to run on regular.
Ty for your anticipated responses.
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I drive a '84 GLI and use regular (85 octane at this altitude of 5400 feet). My thinking is that regular is OK regardless of the octane rating because it changes with your altitude.
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Rabbits
modify
Put in a lower compression engine with a knock sensor. The reason for the higher octane requirement is due to the two above factors....
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The Rabits in the USA came with 8.5 CR as it is. I guess you could go lower with turbo pistons.

Jim B.
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I have an 83 Audi with an 83 VW GTi engine installed in it. It has been running great running regular fuel. I have owned it since 1991 and over 140K miles added to the original 85K miles it had when I bought it. I installed that engine (with same mileage) when I bought this Audi
later, dave Reminder........ Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you are a mile away from them, and you have their shoes. Frieda Norris
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"Michael" wrote:

Rabbits
modify
Lol I use fuel with an 98 octane level
I probably should mention I live in Europe
I believe the engine type JH should be able to use 86 octane...
Roy
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If it pings, then just back the timing back a few degrees.

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Michael wrote:

Octane ratings are not the same across the globe, octane can be measured (represented) a number of ways.
To simplify things, what is the normal range of octane available at the pump where you are?
btw- Installing a low compression motor means you won't need a knock sensor.
TBerk
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The engines in US Rabbits were all low compession.

Jim B.
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hmmm did we forget about those Rabbit diesel engines? <g>
later, dave Reminder........ Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you are a mile away from them, and you have their shoes. Frieda Norris
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On Sunday November 14 at 08:50pm snipped-for-privacy@aol.comANTISPAM (dave) wrote:

23:1, I believe, maybe 24:1. But then, there's only one grade of diesel fuel(alright, two, but ones mainly for colder climates).
--
-Johann Koenig

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I guess the question is this. Who the heck cares to run low octane in an engine that would have cetane speced? Ok, since the question was about octane I guess the correct comment for nitpickers is that all US spec Rabbit gasoline engines were rather low compression.
snipped-for-privacy@aol.comANTISPAM (dave) wrote:

Jim B.
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snipped-for-privacy@doesthisblockporkmindspring.com wrote:

Yeah, So?
TBerk
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Well since the thread has died, the question was about installing a low compression gas engine in a Rabbit. Were there any gas engines back then that were lower compression? I opened up the Bentley and the engines had 8.0, 8.2 and 8.5 to 1 compressions. Hardly what one might call high compression. Never mind, I don't think that research clears up anything for the missing poster.

Jim B.
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83 and 84 Rabbits came with engines that only required "Regular" gas. The manual specifies a minimum requirement for 91 RON or 87 AKI (RON+MON/2).
You should be able to run with "Regular" gas. If it pings with regular, try backing the timing off a bit. If it still pings with the timing backed off, then you might have a bad case of carbon buildup on the piston crowns and combustion chamber surfaces. That could boost compression and increase the octane required by the engine to run without pinging. Milling the head to repair warpage from a blown head gasket and/or overheating damage would also boost compression and increase fuel octane requirements.
But if your engine is stock, you should be able to run "regular" gas without any problems.
-- Racer X
1984 VW Jetta Diesel GT 1992 Mazda Miata 1994 Caravan (OK, maybe it's a keeper, but I still want a VW Caddy) 1995 Ford Escort (Hey, it was free) 1983 VW Rabbit GTI (ITB racer) 1988 Mazda RX-7 (Soon to be ITS racer) 1992 GMC Topkick (portable garage for racecar[s])
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Racer X wrote:

RON, AKI, and MON?
Does anyone know what is displayed on the pump? RON or AKI?
Is different in different countrys?
Will, 89 8v Jetta
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Sorry, should I have done my research first. Looks like the pump is labeled with AKI.
The anti-knock property of a gasoline is generally expressed as its Octane Number. This number is the percentage by volume of iso-octane (assigned 100 octane) in a blend with n-heptane (assigned zero octane) that matches the knock characteristic of a gasoline sample combusted in a standard engine run under controlled conditions as defined by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). One set of conditions produces the Research Octane Number ( RON, indicative of normal road performance) and a more severe set of conditions gives the Motor Octane Number (MON, indicative of high speed performance ). Octane numbers quoted in literature usually refer to RON, unless stated otherwise. Generally, it has become practice to label the gasoline with an arithmetic average of both RON and MON ratings (R+M)/2, called the Anti knock Index (AKI). As per the World Wide Fuel Charter (WWFC) , Jan2000 the proposed specifications are AKI/RON/MON : 86.5/91/82.5.
Will wrote:

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In rec.autos.makers.vw.watercooled, Will wrote:

(M+R)/2 in the US which is AKI per http://www.commerce.state.az.us/Energy/gasfaq.html#_Toc46725050

Yes.
Per http://www.m3forum.com/ubb/Forum3/HTML/001087.html : In Europe the advertised octane number of fuel is RON (Research Octane Number), in North America it is the AKI (Anti Knock Index).
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So all this and it seems to have comes down to the original poster, who has long since left this thread, was wrong about the fuel required for his cars in the 1st place....
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