New 1984 300SD

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Insurance is intended to repair or replace. Most old cars are pretty run out and not worth much so fixing them is more costly than replacing them. So if you invest a lot of $$ in this 21 year old car it will be up
to you to prove its superior condition (and correspondingly higher than average value) in the event of a claim. I went through this a few years ago - and won, on physical condition, complete maintenance history and the insurance company knowing that the car could not be replaced within 90 days. So they paid $5,800 to fix it.
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you would be suprised that some polishing compound will do to bring out the real color
as for every thing else just do what the guys are telling you.
my tranny has been slipping on shifts now for 3 years . changed filters fluids they have tried every thing.
still driving it shifting it my self
its an 82SD with 270,000 when it goes it turns into a parts car
the case, minus a few cans!
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I checked out Zymol Carnauba site. They've got about a million different kinds of waxes. I guess I'll need to read up more on what kind would fir my car ...
Thanks for all your input.
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Zymol, IMO and many others, is a big waste of money unless you want to show your car and wax it the same day you show it. If it stays inside go with P21S if it stays outside go with One Grand Blitz Wax.
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Get the expensive Carnauba that is intended to be hand applied. Clean with Zymol cleaner first. Then get the wax started before taking the car out again. You'll waqnt to put on numerous coats, but each one takes a long time.
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On Tue, 19 Apr 2005 20:51:35 -0400, pool man wrote:

Amen - when I got my 81, it was a flat dust brown from years of neglect. I HATE polishing compound - it's basically liquid sandpaper, but after waxing and waxing and waxing the dead finish with less than wonderful results, I finally gave up and used the polishing compound. Now it's the deep rich brown color you wish your cup of hot chocolate was. She's all purty and shiny now. Just be careful not to do this trick routinely, and be careful not to confuse rubbing compound with polishing compound - it's even more abrasive.

Damn - I've got to wait another 230,000 miles before I can scavenge parts off your car?
Conrad
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Conrad,
Can you give me a play-by-play on what you did with your car - you mentioned polishing compound. My car is dull brown - judging by absence of rust it's been washed, but done so in commercial washes. What did you do and what should I?
Thanks,
Mia
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sorrry Conrad yer just going to have to wait. hope the tranny waits also
the case, minus a few cans!
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On Wed, 20 Apr 2005 11:27:00 -0700, Mia wrote:

Here's a play by play of what I did.
1) first, as I mentioned above I tried waxing - multiple times. It was an improvement, but left much to be desired. 2) I washed the car carefully - it's amazing how much dirt can stick to your car - and all of that dirt is a great source of scratches when you start rubbing the car. 3) Repeat step 2. Really 4) I bought some polishing compound (not rubbing compound) at the local car parts place. I also got some paint cloths, which are supposed to be clean and free of any potentially abrasive things. 5) I found a place I wouldn't have to look at (in my case, the center of the roof) just in case I did something bad to my paint. 6) I moistened one of the paint cloths, dabbed it into the polishing compound, and started rubbing. When I saw how nice and shiny the paint was, I promptly wore my arm out doing the rest of the roof. 7) I awoke the next day unable to move my arms. 8) Back to the parts store to buy a buffing machine. Don't get the simple circular kind. Get the random orbit type. 9) apply the buffer to all the flat surfaces of the car. Be VERY careful on sharp curves and corners - I still did all of these by hand. It's possible to do them with a buffer but you've got to have a light touch, or you can burn right through the paint with a power buffer. 10) wash the car again. 11) wax 12) enjoy
Conrad
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On Wed, 20 Apr 2005 21:54:27 +0000, Conrad wrote:

I forgot the last step - watch in amazement as every bird within three counties uses your new finish for target practice.
Conrad
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Very informative, thanks. Bonus: bird joke is funny :)
I'd like to wash, dry, and wax in the same spot. But I can't wash around my apartment building, and the nearest carwash is across the dirt road. So I can't wash, then drive home, let it dry, then wax. I can't sit at the wash and let it dry, either. Do I hand-dry it?
:)
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I would find someone with a hose, because car washes are no good, and those wash your own car things always use high pressure hoses.
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There is a school of thought that says high-pressure hoses can lift paint off.
DAS
For direct contact replace nospam with schmetterling
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I wish I took a class in that school of thought, because it's true. Thank goodness the lifted paint happened on the Cavalier, and not of the Benz.

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I bought a complete set of "factory" manuals from my local MB dealer for the 240D and 300D. It was a set of 4 rather large manuals that cover everything except the auto trans. As I recall it cost me in the $125 range for all of them.
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When'd you buy them? They haven't printed the manuals in book form for years.
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My stealership said 'it would have to be a special order from Germany to get those manuals'. But then again, according to them, a set of Euro lights for my 300SD would cost $950, an oil change and lube is $600 + tax, and they would even "clean out the cassette player". At that point, I started laughing and hung up in the rudest of fashions. Very ironic - the dream DIY car is one of the most expensive ones to fix.
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I'd be very surprised if they could even special order the books from Germany any more. According to the MB Classic Center they are out of print and will never go into print again.
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I don't doubt that. Do you think $100-150 is reasonable for a CD of scanned images of the manual on Ebay?
Also, I'm starting to make myself anxious thinking about possible repairs that I cannot do on my own. We are moving in a few weeks, and it seems there are no independent mechanics working on MB diesels around our new home. My new 300SD is in pristine condition, every repair done on time at the dealership in Florida, every receipt saved. It's at 130,000 now. Should I just replace things that could-maybe-possibly stall my new Benz NOW while I still have the access to somewhat decently-priced labor? What are the chances of a well-maintained vehicle like that blowing a tranny, or snapping timing chain, etc? It's a 21-year-old car, after all ...
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No, 50 maybe, but not more. It would be worth paying that much for the actual books though...
Marty
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