Suctioning engine Oil thro' dipstick for a 1999 E300 Turbodiesel

Is there a way to suction the engine oil thro' the dip stick, for changing oil? Getting to the drain plug for my car involves removing the cover at the
bottom and is quite tedious. Are there inexpensive suction devices that I can get to perform this? See,s like this will greatly expedite oil performing oil changes. Also, if this is feasible, is this as effective a way to change oil (get all the crud out) as removing the drain plug?
Thanks-Raj
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I believe the dealers use the dipstick tube to evacuated the oil from the crankcase for the reason you cite.
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EXCEPT for the E55 AMG, SL55 AMG, and the CL55 AMG. You cannot evacuate the oil on them. The oil pans are partitioned and they have 2 drain plugs. You have to drain them the old way. But..... they use special micro-encapsulated screw plugs that not reusable do to leaking. But, as of right now, there are NONE in the USA!!

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As TGL said, I thought the dealers suction the oil out of the dipstick. I will check with my local MB mechanic.
thanks-Raj

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I've been using a TopSider oil extraction unit for the last 10 years for my cars and boat. They are aavilable from any marine store for about $39.00. Works great, can do an oil and filter change on the 300SD in about 20 minutes. Here's 2 links to oil changes on your mercedes with photos. http://www.mercedesshop.com/diy_oil_change.htm http://www.mercedesshop.com/diy_oil_change2.htm
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Doug:
Thanks much for the info. I will check and see if there is a marine store in Gainesville. Can the TopSider oil extraction unit be mail ordered? Raj

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You can get 'em at www.westmarine.com.
--
Randall Brink
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

My father has made some 15 years ago such a machine from an old milking machine and it works just fine.
Most MB engine dip sticks (but not all) have now a days a tube over it all the way to the bottom of the oil pan.
So, they do not need a separate hose/tube in the dip stick tube but you can use this dip stick tube in stead. All you need is suitable suction machine and oil comes out in a minute or two by only pressing suction machine hose against the dip stick tube.
I suggest to test this first by taking drain plug out right after using the suction method first. If there isn't any more oil to come out, the suction method is good enough.
Reg: Harri
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I'd have to disagree about the TopSider. I had one and used it for awhile on my boat. It was a real pain in the ass and finally imploded because it's made out of such cheap thin steel it couldn't stand the vacuum.
I now use one of the marine ones that are essentially a plastic 5 gallon bucket with an electric pump mounted on the top lid. The motor is reversible and has clip leads that you just connect to the battery. They cost about $150, but if you intend on doing a lot of oil changes yourself, for the ease of use and durability, that's what I recommend.
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Harbor Freight sells a heavy duty version that use compressed air.. I am thinking of getting one.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumberF149
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Raj, The TopSider is available for mail order through West Marine as Randall said, also through Overton's at http://www.overtons.com/cgi-bin/overtons/detail/pdetail2.cgi?r tail_view&item_num!664 I've used these units for 10 years without problems and have seen one belonging to a friend collapse from misuse. He tried to put way too much vacuum in it and you can't step on them or they will fail. The instructions that come with it specifically state that. I like the Harbor Freight model except for me, I have no compressed air at the marina for my boat. I do approx 12 oil changes a year with this unit.
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Like another poster to this thread, I've used TopSider regularly for quite a number of years on my two cars (an old MBZ 240D and an even older 122S Volvo - at 39, it's 10 years older).
I've never had a problem - well, almost. It sure makes cleaning up and disposing the oil a breeze. There are copy-cat products now. The last one I saw involved a large nylon cylinder as a holding tank but it worked on the same principle and probably cost about the same. It too was being sold by West Marine.
Back when I got my pump, the manufacturer made it very clear that the engine oil should NOT be hot. They recommended that you warm the engine up from cold for only around 5 minutes.
Because of the possibility of implosion, they limited the maximum number of strokes - when the can was empty - to 30-40 strokes (I never needed that much). Once there was any oil in the can, the maximum number of strokes you could apply dropped down to 10-15. They also pointed out that one shouldn't try to steady the can by pushing down on the can with a hand or foot - suggesting how easy it was to implode the can when it had a vacuum.
The only problem I've had with the unit came about when the oil was hot. Because of the vacuum in the system, the long, clear plastic tubing running from the can to the probe that went into the dipstick tube collapsed (permanently, as it turned out). The amount of oil flowing into the can dropped down to next to nothing. From then on, it was a real pain in the butt. I would break the seal to get rid of the vacuum and then pump it up to the maximum 10-15 strokes and wait.... and then repeat the cycle. It seemed to be the only way to avoid having the can implode which, at that point, would be very easy to do if you weren't being careful.
Then I got smart.
I went down to my local Ace hardware store. They sold exactly the same plastic tubing by the foot. I got what I needed and replaced the collapsed tubing. By that time, the oil was no longer hot and, from that time on, everything has been a cakewalk.
Now maybe the new cans are made of "cheap thin steel" that are prone to imploding - what do I know? but what I got back then continues to work for me now.
ron
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Thanks very much for all the helpful info.
Best, Raj
wrote:

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"Because of the possibility of implosion, they limited the maximum number of strokes - when the can was empty - to 30-40 strokes (I never needed that much). Once there was any oil in the can, the maximum number of strokes you could apply dropped down to 10-15. They also pointed out that one shouldn't try to steady the can by pushing down on the can with a hand or foot - suggesting how easy it was to implode the can when it had a vacuum.
The only problem I've had with the unit came about when the oil was hot. Because of the vacuum in the system, the long, clear plastic tubing running from the can to the probe that went into the dipstick tube collapsed (permanently, as it turned out). The amount of oil flowing into the can dropped down to next to nothing. From then on, it was a real pain in the butt. I would break the seal to get rid of the vacuum and then pump it up to the maximum 10-15 strokes and wait.... and then repeat the cycle. It seemed to be the only way to avoid having the can implode which, at that point, would be very easy to do if you weren't being careful.
Then I got smart. "
I'm not so sure about that. You can have all your stroking, pumping, tube collapsing, don't put your foot on it to hold the flimsy thing while trying to pump it or it will implode, etc. The Jabsco electric pump fixes all that once and for all.
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changing oil when its COLD is worthless.
HOT oil suspends all the acids & other crap in the motor and makes changing better for the motor.
if you have the $ for the car don't skimp on your oil change .
i am now saying don't suck it out just get a pump that can handle hot oil.
i my self take mine to to my independent guy. your hands are going to get dirty grabbing the filter any way
the case, minus a few cans!
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