Opinions on transmission Coolers?

When hooking up a trans. cooler,is it better to connect it in conjunction with existing radiator cooler,or just run it straight from trans.?If engine runs warmer than it should,does this shorten
trans.life?If hooked up straight to external cooler,firmer shifts in colder weather?Probably effect gas mileage also? I've seen them connected both ways an would like opinions preferred here. Thanks! Bobby
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You should hook it up between the radiator coolers outlet and the transmission. This will cool the fluid down as it leaves the main cooler in the radiator.
Brian
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Thats the way I was planning on connecting it on my 88 S-10 4.3 Blazer.The engine has a temp. guage on it that gets to around 250 deg.when sitting in traffic.But it doesn't boil the water into the over flow bottle.I believe the guage is off.I will be installing a mech.guage.I had a 83 S-10 P/U 2.8 with an external cooler that was connected straight to the trans.and the fluid was always cool,but it shifted harder in winter until it was driven for a while.The engine was always extremely warm.After running it for a while when I raised the hood it was like taking the lid off a hot pot.But the trans. stayed cool. Bobby
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It all depends on the driving conditions that you experience.
1. Heat in a transmission is your worst enemy and can be a good friend. Let me explain.
If you're driving in the northern states where it is colder, not pulling anything, then hook up the trans cooler tandem with the radiator. The extra heat transfer from the radiator will warm the transmission fluid and bring it up to operating temperatures a lot quicker than having a separate trans cooler.
If you're driving in the southern states or hauling trailers, a stand alone trans cooler independent of the radiator works best. The transmission and especially the radiator will run cooler because the transmission fluid won't be trying to add heat back into the radiator and more heat will be dissipated from the transmission. With stable coolant and trans temps, engine and transmission overheating are less likely to occur.
Either way, add the trans cooler ASAP as this can double your mileage on the transmission before an overhaul.
Steve
On Sat, 8 Jul 2006 21:32:54 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (bobby swift) wrote:

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This is in error. Where do you think the heat from tranny goes when you do a complete bypass? It goes into raditor core (A/C condensor and radiator) so cooling capacity is lost. You ALWAYS hook them up in series by running it through tank cooler first THEN aux cooler and do not go overboard with size either as trany does its best in the 180 to 200 degrees range and you do not want to over cool it. Also by keeping tank cooler in circuit not only do you have more cooling capacity for tranny but you will also keeps its temps more stable. ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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The guy asked for opinions, I gave him mine. You certainly have the right to express yours. Quite frankly though, I stand behind what I have stated.
One, if driving in hot climates, it is best to hook up a slightly oversized (determined by GVW) auxiliary cooler and bypass the tank cooler altogether. The engine will be less likely to overheat.
Secondly, since you want to point out errors. YOU are in ERROR! The transmission is less likely to be overcooled, by running through the aux cooler first and then through the tank cooler.
Thirdly, you are not ALWAYS RIGHT! There is no black and white in automotive upgrades, only shades of gray.
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