Stereo?

2004 GMC Canyon.
Questions:
1) Recommendation for replacement stereo, CD / MP3, multi-disc not required 2) Existing speakers, keep or replace, and if so, with what?
3) I seem to recall someone saying that the OEM stereo electronics are sometimes required for other functions. Elaboration? Does this apply to the Canyon?
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Commentator wrote:

I can't answer your questions, but I do have suggestion for you. Have whatever you want installed, but don't bitch when something goes wrong and when you hit the dealership with the problem, they tell you that "you" will be paying the bill to fix whatever the radio install screwed up. I've seen it numerous times in our dealership.
Ian
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Why the attitude?
Why do you assume I would do such a thing, or that the install will screw something up?
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Commentator wrote:

Because I've seen it happen numerous times. We also see it all the time with aftermarket alarm systems. Which is why GM is now including factory alarm systems on some of their vehicles. They are getting sick and tired of the aftermarket screwing up their vehicles. Frankly, so are we. These are no longer your 67 Malibu with a power, ground, and speaker wires to the radio. Many of the entertainment centers are highly integrated into the electronics of the vehicle.
Good luck with whatever you try.
Ian
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Much too kind of a response!
Ian, you are the quintessential gentleman!
Refinish King

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required
You know it's not likely but you may ask the dealership if changing the radio in any way voids your warranty. It's not likely but I'd hate to find out the hard way. And as Ian stated they may screw something up. Most sound system installers are young kids working for low pay. They have little to no electrical skills and certainly no knowledge of the 2004 GMC your going to give them as a donor!
My two cents
Brian
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to
installers
skills
LOL.
The only installer going near my truck is myself.
I thought I would ask here as quite frankly I do not trust a dealership to give me a straight answer on this one.
According to the post from Ian, that is exactly the kind of snide attitude I expect from a dealer. What I took from his post was:
1) I work at a dealer and should be able to answer the question about functions driven through the stereo but I won't because 2) Your installer will screw something up if I tell you it's ok to do the swap, and 3) You will just blame all your woes on me, so 4) Go away and stop making noise.
Not helpful, just a pure waste of my time.
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find
I
Just a thought, why not contact Crutchfield? They are suppliers of auto and truck sound systems and have always been able to answer my questions in the past. They are at http://www.crutchfield.com
Brian
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are
apply
the
a
to
attitude
the
and
the
Thanks.
I'll give it a go.
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Commentator wrote:

Pretty close. But if you want, you can browse the description/operation section of the manual for your truck. I include it below:
Ian
Radio/Audio System Description and Operation Table 1: Radio Features Table 2: Compact Disc Features Table 3: XM Advisory Messages
The entertainment system on this vehicle is configured with a radio, antenna, and speakers.
The following list shows the radios available for this vehicle:
a.. Radio (UM7) - AM/FM b.. Radio (US8) - AM/FM with CD/MP3 c.. Radio (UC6) - AM/FM, Integral Multi Disc CD Changer Radio Features Controls All Radios
Power Push PWR/PUSH/VOL knob to turn the radio on.
Volume The volume is adjusted by rotating the PWR/PUSH/VOL knob.
Tune Turn the TUNE/SELECT/PUSH RCL knob
Seek Momentarily press SEEK/SCAN button
Scan Hold SEEK/SCAN button at least 4 seconds
Presets Six AM, Six FM1 and Six FM2
Preset Saving Press and hold desired button until an audible beep is heard
Set Clock Press and hold the HR or MN button until an audible beep indicates the time set mode has been entered. Once the beep is heard, the time can be set by tapping each button to incrementally adjust the time. Holding down each button will rapidly change the time.
Recall Push the TUNE/SELECT/PUSH RCL knob
Fade or Balance Press BAL/FADE button to select and adjust w/SELECT knob
Bass, Treble or Midrange Press TONE button to select and adjust w/SELECT knob
Automatic Tone Press AUTO TONE Button
Compact Disc Features Controls All Radios
Eject EJECT button
Fast Forward Preset button 1
Reverse Preset button 4
Disc Preset button 5
Previous Preset button 1
Next Preset button 2
Dolby Preset button 6
Repeat NA
Random Preset button 6
Each item in the list below represents topics covered in detail below.
a.. AM/FM Reception b.. Theft Deterrent c.. Integral Multi Disc CD Changer (IMDX) d.. Radio Data System (RDS) e.. Tape/CD Player Error Messages f.. XM Satellite Radio AM/FM Reception Radio Signal The radio signal is sent from a broadcast station and is then received by an antenna. The strength of the signal received depends on the following:
a.. The power output (wattage) of the broadcasting station b.. The location of the vehicle (or receiver) relative to the broadcast tower. c.. Obstacles between the tower and the receiver d.. Atmospheric conditions e.. What band (AM or FM) the station is broadcasting f.. Type of antenna and the ground plane AM Reception The AM band has a lower frequency range than the FM band. These longer wavelengths:
a.. Bend around obstacles b.. Follow the curvature of the earth c.. May reflect off the ionosphere (skip) The AM frequencies have longer range due to the ground wave. The ground wave follows the curvature of the earth and is effected by its conductivity. Greater conductivity equates to less signal loss thus transmission over water is better than over land. The AM band has a range of 80-320 km (50-200 mi).
FM Reception The shorter wavelengths of the higher frequency FM band:
a.. Reflect off obstacles b.. Are absorbed by the ground c.. Penetrate the ionosphere Broadcasts in the FM band are limited to "line of sight" reception which is typically 40 km (25 mi). Even when out of a direct line of sight, the signal may be reflected into areas that would be in a "shadow" otherwise. Factors which affect the line of sight include:
a.. Height of the broadcast antenna b.. Height of the receiving antenna c.. Terrain and buildings in the broadcast path XM Satellite Radio XM satellite radio provides digital radio reception. The XM signal is broadcast from 2 satellites and, where necessary, terrestrial repeaters. The high power satellites allow the antenna to receive the XM signal even when foliage and other partial obstructions block the antennas view of the satellite. Terrestrial repeaters are used in dense urban ares. These repeaters will receive the satellite signal and re-broadcast them at much higher power levels in order to ensure reception in areas with densely packed tall buildings.
Theft Deterrent The theft deterrent system is a feature on all base and uplevel radios. There is no need to program a security code into the radio as in past model years. The theft deterrent system now utilizes class 2 serial data to determine if the radio is in the appropriate vehicle. Each time the radio receives the "run" power mode message, it compares the VIN information it has stored to the VIN information received from a module on the class 2 serial data circuit responsible for transmitting that information. If a mis-match occurs, the radio display will indicate to the user the radio is locked. Once this takes place the radio will not respond to any button presses and become inoperative. The 2 scenarios able to cause this condition are:
a.. A radio is installed from another vehicle. b.. A module which communicates on the class 2 serial data circuit which supplies VIN information to the radio is replaced and not properly setup with the correct VIN information for that vehicle. The only way to unlock the radio is by using a scan tool.
The digital radio receiver utilizes class 2 serial data to determine if it is in the appropriate vehicle. Each time the digital radio receiver receives the "run" power mode message, it compares the VIN information received from the body control module (BCM) on the class 2 serial data circuit. If a mis-match occurs, the radio display will indicate to the user the digital radio receiver is locked. The digital radio receiver cannot be unlocked, it must be replaced. The 2 scenarios able to cause this condition are:
a.. A digital radio receiver is installed from another vehicle b.. The BCM is replaced and not properly setup with the correct VIN information for that vehicle. MP3 Format (US8) This MP3 player will accept MP3 files that were recorded on a, up to 700 MB, CD-R CD. The files can be recorded with the following fixed bit rates: 32 kbps, 40 kpbs, 56 kpbs, 64 kpbs, 80 kpbs, 96 kpbs, 112 kpbs, 128 kpbs, 160 kpbs, 192 kpbs, 224 kpbs, 256 kpbs, and 320 kpbs or a variable bit rate. Song title, artist name, and album will be available when recorded using ID3 tags versions 1 and 2. The player will be able to read and play a maximum of 50 folders, 50 playlists, 10 sessions, and 255 files. Long file, folder, or playlist names or a combination of a large number of files and folders or playlists may cause the player to be unable to play up to the maximum number of files, folders, playlists, or sessions. If you wish to play large numbers of files, folders, playlists or sessions minimize the length of the file, folder or playlist name. You can also play an MP3 CD that was recorded using no file folders. The system can support up to 11 folders in depth, though, keep the depth of the folders to a minimum in order to keep down the complexity and confusion in trying to locate a particular folder during playback. If a CD contains more than the maximum of 50 folders, 50 playlists, 10 sessions, and 255 files the player will let you access and navigate up to the maximum, but all items over the maximum will be ignored.
Integral Multi Disc CD Changer (IMDX) The integral multi disc CD changer has the capability of storing and playing up to 6 compact discs. The integral multi disc CD changer has a shock-absorbing system. Only under extreme operating temperatures or severe shock or vibration should the compact disc player skip or mute. If the customer travels an abnormally rough road, a skip condition may be normal. Test drive the vehicle on a normal road with a known good CD. If the condition is still present, replace the radio.
The use of CD lens cleaner discs is not advised, due to the risk of contaminating the lens of the CD optics with lubricants internal to the CD mechanism.
Single Disc Loading To operate the integral multi disc CD changer in the single play mode, press the LOAD button for less than 2 seconds. The LED to the right of the disc door will turn green to indicate the CD can be loaded. Insert the disc into the slot, label side up. The player will pull the disc in.
Multi Disc Loading To operate the changer in the multi disc mode, press the LOAD button for more than 2 seconds and the LED to the right of the disc door will flash. Once the light stops flashing and turns green you can load a disc. Insert the disc into the slot, label side up. The player will pull the disc in. Once the disc is loaded, the light will begin flashing again. Once the light stops flashing and turns green you can load another disc.
Removing CDs Use the eject button to remove a disc or discs. Perform the following to eject:
a.. To remove a single disc, press and release the eject button. The message REMOVE CD is displayed. b.. To remove multiple discs, press and hold the eject button for 2 seconds. An audible beep is heard and the LED to the right of the disc door begins to flash indicating a disc is being ejected. The message REMOVE CD is displayed. Radio Data System (RDS) All uplevel audio systems are equipped with technology known as the radio data system (RDS). RDS is a system that sends data along with the audio of the FM station you are currently tuned to. RDS is a standard that defines how a FM broadcast station may send digital data along with the audio program. Think of it as a one way wireless modem, allowing the broadcaster to send information about his program to your receiver.
RDS data is carried in what is known as a "sub-carrier". A sub-carrier is a frequency that the FM broadcaster is authorized to use to send data or other audio programs that are not audible in the main audio program. RDS information can be used to display program information and to control the radio.
To receive the RDS signal, all that is needed is an FM receiver with a RDS circuit. A special integrated circuit capable of dealing with the RDS signal is in the RDS circuit and passes it along to the receiver's microprocessor where it is decoded and acted upon.
RDS Basic Information RDS basic information:
a.. RDS functions are provided in the FM broadcast band only. b.. RDS functions will only work with FM broadcast stations that are broadcasting RDS data. c.. Not all FM Broadcast stations broadcast RDS data or offer all of the RDS services. d.. RDS functions may not work properly when reception is weak, reception is of poor quality, or RDS is not implemented properly by the FM Broadcaster. In some cases, a radio station broadcasting incorrect information may cause the RDS features of the radio to appear to work improperly.
Broadcast RDS information can be used in a variety of ways by the receiver and listener, but basically falls into 2 categories: Display and Control.
Displaying Program Information RDS displays textual information such as:
a.. The name of the station b.. The type of program c.. General information such as artist and song title, call in phone numbers, etc. RDS is always on. When tuned to a non-RDS station, your radio will display frequency information as you would normally expect. When tuned to a RDS station, your radio will change from displaying the frequency of the FM station to displaying the call letters of the station or display the nickname of the station. This feature is known as the Program Service Name.
Controlling the Radio RDS can control the radio when data the receiver can use responds to timely information performing the following:
a.. Interrupt the playback of your cassette or CD for traffic or emergency bulletins. b.. Search for stations by type of program. c.. Automatically follow networked programming from transmitter to transmitter as you travel from one listening area to another. d.. Set your clock to the time that the RDS Broadcast station broadcasts. Viewing and Selecting RDS Information for Display Press the TUNE knob once for less then 2 seconds when the radio displays the program service name and the frequency of the station will be displayed. Press the knob again, and the program type (PTY) will be displayed. Pressed again, and the program name will be displayed (if the broadcaster is broadcasting one). The program name is an eight-character name that the broadcaster may use to further identify the type of programming currently being broadcast.
Using the RDS Traffic Feature Some RDS broadcasters may carry traffic information programming to inform you of current traffic conditions in your listening area and is indicated by the icon in the radio display. RDS enables the broadcaster to get this information to you even when you are listening to a tape or compact disc. This feature can be enabled or disabled by the listener. Press the TRAF button to find a station that claims to carry traffic information. You may do this even when playing a cassette tape or compact disc. This action will operate in the background without interrupting the current playback. If the radio is not currently tuned to an RDS traffic station, the radio will immediately SEEK an RDS traffic station. If the radio finds an RDS traffic station, the TRAF icon will appear in the radio display as will brackets around the (TRAF) icon. If the radio cannot find an RDS traffic station after searching through the entire FM band, the radio will display NO TRAFFIC.
Alternate Frequency (AF) Switching RDS permits broadcaster's to send information to the radio that allows the radio to automatically switch frequency to the best quality station in that broadcaster network.
Since the radio is displaying the broadcaster call letters or nickname, the listener will not see the frequency during an AF switch unless you have changed the default display to be frequency instead of Program Service name.
To enable or disable AF switching perform the following:
a.. Press and hold the AM/FM button for 2 seconds or more. b.. The radio will display AF ON or AF OFF depending on the current condition of AF and a confirmation beep will be heard. When AF is enabled and you recall a RDS station stored on preset, the radio determines if the station stored is of acceptable quality. If not, the radio checks all available AF's for your station. If the radio fails to locate your program, AF SEARCH will be displayed as the radio scans across the band looking for your program or an affiliated network. If the radio cannot find the original station or an acceptable alternate frequency NOT FOUND will be displayed and the radio returns to the original frequency for the preset.
RDS Clock Time Broadcasters can choose to send clock time information in the RDS data. This information can be used to update the clock time on the radio. RDS clock time is broadcasted once a minute. To set the clock using RDS clock data perform the following:
a.. Press and hold the HR and MIN buttons together for 2 or more seconds to update the time. b.. The display will show UPDATED after receiving the broadcasted time data. c.. If the broadcaster is not broadcasting the time data, the radio will display NO UPDATE and the time remains unchanged. Radio Error Messages The radio displays the following error messages:
CHECK CD Displays when the player encounters a focus or tracking error.
CHK CDXX Displays when the CD changer encounters a focus or tracking error, If equipped.
NO DISC Displays when the radio expected a disc to be inserted.
NONE Displays when the radio is unable to detect the vehicle speed data information via the class 2 serial data circuit.
XM Satellite Radio XM is a national satellite radio service that offers up to 100 coast to coast channels including music, news, sports, talk and children's programming. XM provides digital quality audio and text information, including song title and artist name. A service fee is required in order to receive the XM service. For more information, contact XM at www.xmradio.com or call 1-800-852-9696.
Digital Radio Receiver The radio controls communicate with the digital radio receiver via the class 2 communication circuit. The digital radio receiver sends low level audio signals to the radio.
Viewing Messages Press the TUNE/SELECT/RCL knob while in XM mode to view various pieces of information related to the current song or channel. By pressing TUNE/SELECT/RCL knob, you may view four different categories of information: Artist Name/Feature, Song/Program Title, Channel Category, and other Additional Information that may be broadcast on that channel. Additional Information messages may not always be available. Each of the four information types may have multiple pages of text. To reach a category, press TUNE/SELECT/RCL knob consecutively until the desired type is displayed. If there are multiple pages of text for the selected information type, the radio will automatically display all the pages for that type at a rate of approximately one page every three seconds before timing out and returning to the default display. You may override this feature by pressing the TUNE/SELECT/RCL knob to review all of the pages at your own pace.
Selecting a Program Type The TUNE/SELECT/RCL knob can be used to scroll through the list of available program types (PROG TYPE). Press the PROG TYPE button, then turn the TUNE/SELECT/RCL knob to scroll through the available program types. When the desired program type is shown on the display, press the SCAN button. The radio will seek the next station of that type.
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That was really useful Ian.
a) I know how to read an owner's manual. b) The manual I have and what you have posted below do not speak at all to the question I asked. c) The stereos you list as available are not available here. Choices are UB0 and UC6. d) Which just illustrates even more clearly how useless your response is.
Just so we are absolutely clear: You are an ass.
<much useless garbage snipped>
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Asswipe,
Ian is one of the most valuable techs on this newsgroup and it would be in your best interest to quell the hostilities in case you ever need expert help with a REAL problem.
Just so we are absolutely clear: You are an asshole.
Doc

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to
are
is.
Well, that now says something about you too.
If I am an asshole for not being willing to take attitude without pushback, I will take the label gladly.
The tone / type of response generated by my query was uncalled for and unhelpful. He was patronizing, condescending, and rude. Even more so on his second post. As you are being.
My posts are tailored to what I respond to.
In other words, fuck off.
If this is what you call being helpful, I guess I'll just use other resources.
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Oooooo did we hit a nerve? <g> I think I'll just stick around as your personal troll for awhile.
Doc
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LOFL
This ought to be interesting? <G>
Refinish King

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Childish twits.
In order for someone to be successful as my "personal troll", they would need to know what buttons I cannot ignore. Hunt away, snipe away, I am done with you.
BTW, the acronym you are looking for is ROFL, unless you can come up with some new, creative meaning for LOFL?

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done
Ignorant fuck
The acronym should be ROFLMFAO... and like I said earlier..... Don't let the door hit you in the ass..... It's just a radio.... rip the old one out and put the new one in....lol Bob
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You bore me:
You coloncheese!
PLONK!
Refinish King

your
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Hi!
Ooooohh...Doc's trolling these days?
Never thought I'd see that one happen! :-)
William The Guesser...who had also guessed he'd never ever see the entirety of his basement stacked at the curb...
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William R. Walsh wrote:

You sound like a troll to me!
Ian
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