1999 Ford Explorer OBD-II Trouble Codes

I am experiencing some difficulty in understanding what in the heck is the deal with these codes. My usual "Ford Doctor" who is reliable as
the day is long, could not aid in the repair of my 1999 Ford Explorer, as his scanner only worked on cars with earlier than OBD-II cars. So, I had no other choice but to look for a scanning tool within my price range, that I could read the trouble codes, and reset my "Check Engine Light". I decided on the DriveRight E/X Car Chip. I have been having trouble with cold weather starts appx 20 degrees Fahrenheit or so. The Explorer will start, but has trouble idling. I keep having to set in the car, and keep playing with the accelerator, so the car will not stall when I have it warming up, before making my morning drive to work. If I do not set in it, and keep hitting the gas, it will eventually start running real rough, and stall.
I have been getting constant trouble codes of P0213 and P0216. Which (according to the codes) indicate "Cold Start Injector 1" and "Injector Timing Control Circuit". Here is where it gets a "little cloudy"...... My "Ford Doctor" does not know what a "Cold Start Injector 1" is. He's never heard of it. Said that he called the Ford Dealer, and they have no idea what it is either.
Meanwhile, my "Ford Doctor" purchased a scanner that will read OBD-II codes. And has come up with the answers to my problem being a temperature sensor. He could only get this thing from the Ford Dealer. The ones that he tried from Auto Zone and Advanced Auto did not fit for one reason or another. Anyway ....... stopped by to pick up the Explorer after work today, and found out that he had broken the Temperature Sensor while trying to install it. Said it was a real B---- to get at to install. So, he's waiting on another delivery tonight, will get it installed, and let it set all night outside, and see if it will start and run in the morning.
Does anyone in the group here have any idea what the "Cold Start Injector 1 is ????? Could it be a valve, or a switch maybe ..... ???? Or even a temperature sensor ????? I'm having a little trouble with the Nomenclature or the wording here anyway. If it's refering to the Number One Injector, Then why are they using the words "Cold Start" along with it then ????
Can anyone help me out here .... ????
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Ford vehicles do not have a cold start injector...... quite common in European vehicles of the past (not sure about the present) as well as some older Japanese. Additionally, I would have to assume the reference to injector timing circuit would be the thermo-time delay associated with cold start injectors. I have no experience with the code reader you acquired, and it sounds like I probably wont...
Since your Ford??? doctors scan tool brought forth a temperature sensor code (I assume coolant temp?) and made no mention of the two previous codes, I'm left wondering. Be aware that one or two ECT codes will point towards long warm up times..... IOW, a faulty thermostat - obviously changing the ECT wont fix that. I wont pass comment on a "mechanic" that doesn't install new parts with due care and diligence...... he must certainly realize that he is dealing with his customers.... those people that feed his family and pay his rent.... Can't speak for anyone else, but my customers are second in importance only to my family. I can't stress the importance of additional formal training enough...... I know I certainly wouldn't enjoy the thought of someone getting their OTJ training on my car....
Lastly, the symptoms you describe fit in with a well known pattern failure evident on all flavours of the 4.0....... intake manifold leaks. When the motor is cold, gaps open up between the intake gasket and the two sealing surfaces.... this unauthorized air entry fools the PCM into thinking less air is entering the motor than actually is, leaning the mixture and causing rough running and stalling. Since the O2s are not up to operating temp, the PCM is not looking at their signal to modify the fuel delivery. As the motor warms, expansion helps seal the existing leaks bringing the idle fuel mixture into designed range, keeping the O2s from detecting any lean mixture conditions.
OBD2 was conceived to assist the automotive aftermarket..... The idea was that all cars would exhibit the same code(s) for the same conditions. A P0300 is the code for random misfires..... this is true for any make and model of automobile sold in North America, i.e. - a P0300 is the same whether it is a Pontiac GrandAm or a V10 FSuperDuty. But one very important point to remember..... this only works for codes considered 'emissions critical'. Any other computer controlled functions that do not deal with either tailpipe or evaporative emissions are usually proprietary and are not required to share any definitions with other marques. As you have seen, there are many code descriptions that do not fit a particular system. Occasionally, these *may* appear as "phantom" codes and will not usually set the MIL.
HTH.
Jim Warman snipped-for-privacy@telusplanet.net

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Thanks for the comments. I was kind of wondering about that cold start valve stuff .... I had gone to some of the autoparts net pages, and I would do a search for a "Cold Start Valve" ..... but none of the websites had any in stock. Now I know why !!! Thanks for queing me in on that part of the problem.
I had a real fiasco with a Ford dealer about 2 years ago. I had just gotten the Explorer, and it ran fine in the summer months, but come winter, I kept getting a "Check Engine Light". I never owned a car with one of these "new fangled idiot lights before. Didn't even know how to get rid of it, other than take it to a mechanic or dealer. Anyway, first they replaced the Intake Manifold Gasket, said I had a leak there. Drove it for a few days..... the light re-appeared. This time they changed the computer. No charge for the computer, it was still covered under the warrenty. Just got charged for the labor. Again, a few days later my friend, the light, re-appeared again.
The Explorer did not run bad; it drove nice as usual, but I had since found out how to get rid of the "Check Engine Light" . I found out that if you disconnect the battery, it resets the light. I got tired of hit and miss service tactics (Guessing sounds more like it) and being charged for services that don't fix anything ........ That's why I went and purchased my CarChip OBD-II scan tool, and prayed for warm weather to set in early !!!
So, I just kept resetting the light, and drove it until warmer weather came into season, and my troubles with the check engine light went away. But now, this year it's different. It won't idle when it's cold. It will run, but if you don't set in the auto, and tap the gas when it starts to cough and sputter, it will die. After it gets warm, it idles fine again.
Thanks for the help in understanding the concept of the Cold Start Valve, and the Ford Explorer. I guess I have no choice but to take a chance on a different dealership, and pray that this different one does not "Rake me over the Coals" like the last one did.
On Wed, 14 Jan 2004 03:24:54 GMT, "Jim Warman"

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