Name for the bit that supports the outer bearing race while a drift is used?

This enquiry is from a friend of mine:
what do they call the implement that you'd use to protect a bearing whilst it is being pressed into a housing ? I'm thinking along the
lines similar to a drift that you'd use to knock a bearing in, but I'd be using a hydraulic press to push the bearing in and so I want something fit for the job that'll go in between the press and the outer race of the bearing.
I'd use a suitably sized socket.
Any thoughts?
TIA
Richard
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Richard Savage wrote:

Bearing race support? ;)
Ditto with the socket, I try to use impact sockets as they are much more resilient than 'normal' sockets and seem to have better tolerances on outer diameters.
--
Paul - xxx
"You know, all I wanna do is race .. and all I wanna do is win"
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wrote:

impact sockets are normaly softer than normal sockets so they don't shatter when in use they have thicker walls to carry the load and would be ideal for driving in a bearing
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As a plant Mechanic here in the land of Oz you call the outer bit of a bearing - outer race and as an apprentice they called the bit you are discribing as a dolly.. A term that has fallen into dis-use..
I'd us a suitably sized socket also.. Even if I was going to knock it in with a hammer..
Pannawonica ..
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Thanks Both
Yep, I'd told my friend to use a hardened socket!
Cheers
Richard
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wrote:

Thanks Both
Yep, I'd told my friend to use a hardened socket!
Cheers
Richard
One thing people do is use a brass drift..this is not a good thing to do..
1) the thought behind it is that brass is a 'soft' metal and won't damage the bearing.. 2) the problem is that because brass is a 'soft' metal it work hardens and flakes.. those flakes can end-up in the bearing and can cause the balls or rollers not turn or if they manage to get between the bearing surface create a pressure point and damage the bearing.. 3) Using a hardend steel dolly can also damage the bearing.. 4) So using a mild steel dolly is preferable.. 5) When you use a socket best to use a non-chrome type because the chrome can flake also.. 6) I never take my own advice :>)
Pannawonica ..
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Thanks Pannawonica
Info. passed on.
Rgds
Richard
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