Do we really need to use "dri gas" anymore?

Years ago it was common to put a can of "dri gas" into the tank with each f
ill up to absorb any water that might have gotten into the fuel. After awhi
le we were told that the dri gas was added at the refinery to prevent probl
ems in the delivery trucks and so it as not needed anymore. Now with the 10
percent ethanol we have in the gas is it really helpful or necessary for t
hat matter to even use it at all? Lenny
Reply to
captainvideo462009
wrote:
"Dry gas" was ethanol, or sometimes isopropanol. Adding more ethanol to gas that already has a lot of ethanol in it doesn't help anything.
In fact, one of the problems with modern ethanol-containing gas is that it will absorb moisture too easily.
I still buy "Dry gas" additive, but I put it in my windshield wiper solution for better de-icing. --scott
Reply to
Scott Dorsey
On Thursday, March 8, 2018 at 11:16:43 AM UTC-10, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wr ote:
fill up to absorb any water that might have gotten into the fuel. After aw hile we were told that the dri gas was added at the refinery to prevent pro blems in the delivery trucks and so it as not needed anymore. Now with the 10 percent ethanol we have in the gas is it really helpful or necessary for that matter to even use it at all? Lenny
My guess is that you don't need any that stuff any more. I can't see why yo u'd need it at all since cars have a sealed fuel system these days.
Reply to
dsi1
There is still some use for these. Older gas stations frequently have moisture in their tanks and some gas is purposefully diluted by cheats. I remember my car stalling badly about 20 miles after tanking at an Indian reservation in New Mexico. Bad fuel was the culprit.
Reply to
Basia
Or filling your tank when the station's tank is nearly empty. Back in the dark ages when gas was leaded we siphoned some of the gas back into a glass jar -- proof that it was roughly 1/5 water. I think we added denatured alcohol, but I think it would have required a LOT of it, but maybe not.
Reply to
The Real Bev
Show me a car that has a sealed system that actually runs. They are all vented through the charcoal canister. Water vapor can still get in as well as the amount that is already absorbed into the ethanol in the gas.
Dri-Gas can be helpful if you are using gas that has been stored a while or that came from a store with low fuel sales. Or if you run straight gas without ethanol like I do in all the small engines and vehicles when possible.
Reply to
Steve W.
Still test gas the same way today. The ethanol added in makes gas act like a sponge. I've seen gas test out that bad or worse.
Reply to
Steve W.
Years ago if there was water in a car gas tank, a fifth of Whiskey poured into the tank, the alcohol molecules would 'cut' the water and allow the engine to run. That would depend on how much water was in the tank.
Reply to
allisellis851
There are valves in the fuel system to equalize tank pressure and the purge vapors from the charcoal canister. It's still a sealed system.
Reply to
dsi1
No it is not. You have a purge valve at one end that allows the engine to pull the fuel vapor that is stored in the charcoal canister. At the other end you have the canister VENT valve. The only time it closes is when the system runs an EVAP test. The remainder of the time it is open to allow the fuel tank to vent. The charcoal canister is in between the tank and the vent valve. It's job is to capture the fuel vapor and keep it from escaping out the vent into the atmosphere.
Reply to
Steve W.
You are 100% correct about that. That's why there's a valve in the fuel system to equalize tank pressure. My guess is that any air that enters the system through that route wouldn't contain much water vapor.
Reply to
dsi1
I live in northern Illinois. I've used about 3 cans of Heet in my gas in over 50 years of driving. I guess just because I was feeling frisky. Last time was probably 40 years ago. Never had any water problems. Excepting a gas tank rusting through, but that from the outside, on the seams. I've also used a few bottles of Techron, again because I felt like wasting a few bucks. Never used Stabil for my yard equipment, and rarely drain the gas between seasons. It might be luck in buying equipment with carbs that aren't prone to gumming up. The only additives I've used with any effect are Seafoam equivalents to free stuck lifters.
Reply to
Vic Smith
guess just because
y water problems.
g a few bucks.
ree stuck lifters.
You guys on the mainland have it hard with your changing temperatures. I li ve in a tropical paradise so we don't need any of those little bottles. I h ave used fuel dryers when I was on the mainland. Beats me why I felt the ne ed to use them. One problem with living in a tropical paradise is the we go t roaches in the cars. On second thought, maybe you guys have it easy.
I have used Alumaseal since the 70's in the radiator as a prophylactic. I h ave used K&W Block Seal for a leaky head gasket - that worked out great for me. I've even used Techron - but who the heck doesn't? One thing I haven't used is moth balls in the gas tank. I might be gullible but not that gulli ble. Hee hee.
Reply to
dsi1

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