water pump impeller gone bad?

On Tue, 23 Oct 2012 03:36:27 -0700 (PDT), m6onz5a


That's an interesting idea. I did recently replace the belt, who knows, maybe things fit two ways. I'm giving it low odds though because that would make the fan turn the wrong direction and I'd think that would make a funny noise. At least it's easy to check.
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says...

WHY did you replace the water pump 10,000 miles ago?
The job of the water pump is to circulate coolant.
The job of the thermostat is to regulate the flow of coolant to the radiator. Closed if too cool / open if too hot.
With that said, is the top of the radiator too hot to touch when it reaches 240?
Is the air blowing out of the radiator hot?
Is the bottom of the radiator cooler than the top of the radiator?
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wrote:

Old water pump had started leaking. I took temp reading at several spots but don't recall the readings. I'll have to do it again sometime and see how the top of radiator temp compares to thermo housing temp, etc.
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On 10/22/2012 01:55 PM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

I see you've got plenty of replies, but my first thought (from my knowledge of Chevys which may not be directly applicable) is that is the engine in your vehicle available in both V-belt and serpentine belt configurations, depending on year/model? If you replace a "reverse rotation" pump with one from a conventional v-belt model or vice versa, the WP will be a lot less efficient.
I've never seen a bad impeller personally, but it is possible, especially with the newer composite/plastic impellers. BMW has had some issues with this in the past few years.
Another potential issue with rebuilds I've seen was an impeller pressed too far onto the shaft causing excessive clearance between the impeller vanes and the housing when installed. This was a known issue with some rebuilt pumps for Studebaker V-8s a few years back. One vendor was hand checking the pumps and using a gear puller to tweak the impellers to the correct position before shipping them out.
Long story short, I would personally test the thermostat with a saucepan and a thermometer; next check and make sure that the lower hose (assuming conventional flow) isn't collapsing. If neither of those indicate a problem and the rise in temp. coincided exactly with the maintenance items you listed, occam's razor suggests trying a new WP.
good luck,
nate
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wrote:

I posted the above 18 months ago and got a lot of helpful answers. Don't drive the vehicle much so just lived with it last summer for the few times I drove it. It was really heating up at the Drive-Through windows and still running hot most of the time on the highway.
Anyway.... a couple weeks ago I bit the bullet and got a new water pump from rockauto. Took the old one off and put the new one on. The old one still looked like new, no wear at all on the impeller. Since they were different brands there were slight difference between the exact shapes of the impellers but nothing that looked significant. The thing I was looking for and the only thing that appeared to be different was that on the new pump the clearance between the impeller and the housing that forms the "pump cavity" was about half what it was on the old pump - along the lines of 0.030 on the old overheating pump and 0.015 on the new pump.
With the new pump in place the truck now runs at the temps it always did before, very cool. Maybe there was some difference in the pumps besides the clearance but I couldn't see any. I've heard from many Pontiac people that they clearance their water pump separator plates on the old V8's because a very slight increase in clearance reduces pump flow significantly so they make it as tight as they can without it rubbing. It's the only thing I can figure for this Ford pump. O'Rielly's gave me my money back for the old lifetime warranty pump, never even asked what was wrong with it.
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On Wednesday, April 2, 2014 7:48:22 PM UTC-6, Ashton Crusher wrote:

Interesting but doesn't explain why it ran great for 4000 miles. At least you got it worked out. Will be interesting to see if it comes back in 4k miles.
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On Wednesday, April 2, 2014 9:48:22 PM UTC-4, Ashton Crusher wrote:

In the meantime, I actually have seen a WP impeller failure, oddly enough o n a different Ford V6.
Car (late-ish model Mustang) came in with an overheating complaint and a no ise that sounded like a bad WP but customer didn't authorize changing it as there was also a coolant leak from thermostat housing. New housing, stat, and gaskets later, leak gone, car still overheating after a few minutes of running. With belt removed, WP rotated freely and bearings did not wobble . No leak from WP.
thermostat was then removed, reassembled without stat, upper hose removed f rom radiator, water from garden hose would flow through engine/rad in eithe r direction. Engine started and revved, no flow evident through hose. Inf ormed customer that the next step was removing water pump, when impeller sp inning on shaft was found. New WP installed, problem solved.
nate
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