Toyota Road Trip

A friend and I may be taking a cross-country trip this summer from Missouri to Arizona and California, and of course back to Missouri.
This is another point for me to consider when buying a Camry or Corolla. Is it harder on an engine of the size used in the Corolla (1.8 liters) to maintain 65 miles per hour over very long distances than it would be on a 2.4 liter Camry engine (4 cylinder)?
Would the Corolla's engine be punished or take a beating traveling 5 or 6 thousand miles over such a short period of time, mostling at 65 mph?
Thanks.
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Either engine is pretty much loafing at 65, especially with the overdrive engaged. I wouldn't necessarily take a brand new car on such a trip to prevent break-in problems, but a car with at least a thousand miles or so should be fine.
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Isnt the Corola lighter. Dont worry.
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I have 212,000 on my 1.8 93 Corolla and drive it about 90 miles every day. It does up to 80 with no sweat, but I have the 3 speed overdrive transmission, too.
Charles of Kankakee
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There is no problem in maintaining 65mph in both. Smaller engine in corolla is working with a smaller and lighter car. There is a huge difference in the comfort of the ride. Especially on long distance trips. And this is very important. I am surprised you think so long about the choice between corolla and camry. For me the choice is simple: CAMRY.
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Do you mean you'll spell each other as drivers and just keep pounding along day & night? If so, you'll wear out yourselves before you wear out the Corolla.
Even on the southern route into California you'll be going through mountainous country, but the cars and their engines are well matched for normal loads. Will you have normal loads, or do you expect to load it heavily? If the latter, consider the Camry just because you'll have more of the load inside.
The A/C will be on most of the time. Perhaps a Corolla owner can comment on how that affects the available power in the mountains.
Brent
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I live in mountainous country and from what I see every day I can assure you a Corolla loaded with people and belongings does not have ANY available power, when driven in mountainous country with the AC on, period. You will be holding the throttle to the floor all day trying to maintain the speed limit and will get poor fuel mileage when driven that way. Buy a V6 Camry, if indeed they are your only choices.
Better yet since it is only a trip, don't buy EITHER. You can RENT a Ford Crown Vic with unlimited mileage for less than $20 day. The CV has plenty of room for more people, more 'stuff,' plenty of power, is a much safer vehicle, rides much better and will get 25 MPG at 65 MPH. Why do you think the police and taxi fleets prefer the CV? ;)
mike hunt
wrote:

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Mike
I think he wants to have a good vacation. Adding a Ford to the mix increases his chances of a bad vacation. Plus, he probably wants to make it alive.
Dan
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Dan J.S. wrote:

Please don't feed the trolls.
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Mike Hunter wrote: snip

Which rental agency has this? You can probably rent a Camry w/V6 that will run circles around a CV and should get over 30 MPG.

Have to agree with this.

Can't agree on safer and knowing Ford I'm suspect of the 25 MPG.

Dates back to when all PD thought they had to have full-size vehicles (for hauling perps) with rear-wheel drive (more controllable in skids and etc). Most of this was due to personal preference, not managements. Many cops complained when anti-lock brakes were added as they couldn't skid to a stop (many times sideways) and claimed this was a faster stop. Many PD's are switching to smaller front-wheel drive vehicles as manufactures make them available with "police pachages" to save on purchase cost and fuel. Also, Ford undercuts the purchase price to fleets, government and etc. to get their vehicles exposed, i.e. cheapest vehicle you can buy. (They even did it on retail Taurus and the next smaller one at one time so they could claim #1 title, which Toyota beat by offering quality Camry's and Corolla's, not cheapness.) For 2 or 3 years we couldn't get any local GM or Chrysler dealers to bid as they knew they were going to be underbid by Ford. Lastly, with the exception of the Ford Superduty's, we have had more trouble with Fords in our fleet than any other brand. If they would only buy Toyota's. :-) davidj92
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On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 10:43:36 -0600, "davidj92"

BULL. The CV has more room under the body for mods such as better suspension and bigger powerplant.
. with rear-wheel drive (more controllable in skids and etc).
More bullshit. FW drive is much more controllable in skids. If they made a good fwd CV, the fuzz would be all over it.

More total bullshit. Sliding to a stop is something done in Starsky and Hutch. Not something they'd WANT to do in real life.

Of course, GM is still the number one car maker, not Ford. So you're wrong again.
Obviously, you've no clue what you're talking about.
--
gburnore at DataBasix dot Com
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Anyone who knows anything about automobiles knows RWD is by far a better handling vehicle than a FWD vehicle. Anyone who believe differently has not idea what they are talking about.
Take it from one formally in the business of servicing fleet vehicles. Every vehicle manufacture offers a discount to fleets. The difference from one to another is within $200. The two smaller V6 FWD police vehicles, that are available, sell for 2,000 less than the V8 RWD CV. The $2,000 is eaten up in maintenance costs in the first 18 months. No police department worth its salt uses FWD vehicle for patrol work. The PA State Police even ban unmarked FWD cars from being driven above the posted speed limit because several trooper where killed in FWD car given to them by the feds to enforce the 55 speed limit under the federal 55 alive program. They use FWD vehicles for administrative duty only mike hunt
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Mike Hunter wrote:

bah!!! best handling vehicle I ever drove was a 1986 Honda Accord LXi with vanilla Goodyears.
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Obviously my post was direct to those that actually know something about handling, not folks like you ;)
mike

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Richard, Mike Hunter is correct. Why would NASCAR take a normally FWD Taurus or Monte Carlo and make it a RWD car for race purposes if FWD handled better? Why are high performance cars like the Ford GT, Porsches, Ferraris, Aston Martins, Corvettes, McLaren, Formula 1, Indy, and all Top Fuel drag cars all RWD if FWD handled better?
FWD vehicles cost less to produce than a comparable RWD vehicle, which is why lower priced vehicles tend to be FWD.
--
Ray O
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Ray O wrote:

I don't mean in the nascar circuit.. .I should've been more clear. I mean in the rain / snow. I'll never forget the day in Richmond we had a blizzard -- and Richmond folks usually board up when they see one snowflake -- and I was one of the only folks who could get around in my car. I ended up picking a few friends up and going downtown to the diner for a long "snowday" brunch. I was so proud of my little Honda.

OK silly. You're right about all the other stuff. I mean in daily driving.
Imagine taking a 4 cylinder 2.2l car out against a Mustang.

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There are conditions FWD has an advantage but in every day driving in dry conditions, RWD is the way to go.
Police departments have to determine is what they are going to use the vehicles for. For example, the Illinois State Police have gotten away from Crown Vics and have changed over to Impalas, probably because they no longer do high speed pursuits. The City of Chicago still has Crown Vics as do most other municipal and county police depts, with a smattering of SUV's thrown in for winter conditions.
IMO, the most effective mix would be RWD V8's and SUV's for responding in poor road conditions.
--
Ray O
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Those that do not know a hill of beans about handling often mistake the fact the FWD vehicles may have superior traction in unplowed snow, with better handling at speed. The fact is RWD will handle far better than FWD on plowed or wet and icy roads and are therefore much safer. Just look at the typed of cars that were never sold with FWD. The simple act of letting of off the throttle in a FWD vehicle can send you into a spin. When one lets off the throttle, in a RWD vehicle, the resulting engine braking become immediately apparent and one instantly applies some throttle. The same situation in a FWD vehicle produces an instant loss of steering control, particularly when the vehicle is equipped with an automatic tranny. That phenomenon is the reason engineers designed the automatic transmission in ALL FWD vehicles so the lever can be simply slid into neutral without the chance of engaging reverse, to negate the loss of steering control. The majority of FWD car drivers do not even realize they can do that, and instead use the brakes, which simply exacerbates the loss of control.
I live most of the time in the mountains of PA, in the heart of the snow belt. I see FWD cars spinning their wheels on wet and icy roads, as the weight shifts to the rear, when trying to clime steep grades. . ALL my cars are and have and for the most part, always been RWD. A traction lock axle and a set of good 'winter rubber' tires is all I need to get me anywhere I want to go. The PA State Police use CVs all year round as well, except for when the snow is too deep then they use 4WD Jeeps and Explorers.
mike hunt

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Mike Hunter wrote:

sure thing... and next snow storm, I'll watch you spin out in your crown vic while I easily wiggle my way out with my fwd.
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Hey Mikey did you ever own a 50000$ Cadillac FWD, I do , yea BS its unsafe. I remember those big 70s Eldos 500CI FWD. RWD for midwest idiots who need to plow to get out of the garage. Enjoy your next snow today, FWD dont fishtail out on acceleration, thats where the Weight is, in front. FWD go up snowed up inclines, RWD spin out, in the ditch.
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