How may pad sets will a rotor stand?

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Apparently, you don't, really. The rust I mentioned comes from letting the car sit parked outside overnight where condensation (dew) forms on the rotors, forms drips on the inside and outside edges, rusts in those areas, and is insufficiently cleared the following day because the driver's normal braking pattern is too tentative or gentle. The rust then slowly starts cutting away the surface of the pad (it's harder than the pad) and the pad gets progressively worse at clearing the rust which obviously continues cutting away more pad. Quite a nasty syndrome that's easily addressed by braking more aggressively to be sure to knock off all the rust daily. Driving through water has almost nothing to do with it. The greatest problems with rust on rotors come from the car *sitting*, not being driven.

For an individual driver, that's correct, but some drivers can still extend their pads' lives by 'smart braking', so your mileage *still* may vary.

Fair enough. Two sets isn't a bad rule of thumb.

Good thinking.

Like PBR Deluxe pads ... -- C.R. Krieger "Ignore 'em, m'dear; they're beneath our dignity." - W.C. Fields
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When I mentioned hitting a pool I was not thinking of rust but rather of disc warp because of a sudden change in temperature, a known phenomenon in some Ford Focus.
Yours,
JP

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JP Roberts wrote:

Before I start, let me just say that I usually replace the rotors each time I replace the pads. It's easier, gives me peace of mind, they look pretty, etc.... 8-)
As far as cutting a rotor on a lathe is concerned, it really doesn't impact the overall ability of the part to dissipate heat by a meaningful amount as long as it is still within spec. Consider that a normal "turning" results in only a few thousandths of an inch of material being removed from each side of the rotor. Visit your local machine shop and see how much powdered metal is shaved off a rotor being cut. I suspect that if you weighed the rotor before and after the difference would be insignificant. So you're really not changing the ability of the rotor to act as a heat sink if you're not taking away a meaningful amount of mass and other factors remain constant.
But like I said, I always just put new ones on my car. It's easier.
Cheers,
C
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