'92 Daytona IROC 2.5 Turbo fuel line removal tool usage

Am trying to replace fuel line and cannot figure out how to orient the metal fuel line removal tool. This tool is 3/8" on one side and 5/16" on
the other. There are other packages of 5 at AutoZone, but they look kind of cheap (and are plastic) and I only need the 5/16". Do I have the right tool and how do you use it properly?
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I have no idea what you are talking about.
Glenn Beasley Chrysler Tech
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Glenn, Reading back, I have no idea what I'm talking about either...let's see if I can explain myself so another actual person can understand the situation. OK...I was removing the timing belt cover from a 2.5 Daytona IROC. The cover was sticking, so I yanked on it. When it suddenly became unstuck, I managed to put hole in the rubber fuel line, which is located between the cover and the strut tower (leading to the fuel rail). This line lays in between two metal lines, each of which has a "collar" which makes a sealed connection out of both ends of the rubber hose. Next, we cut to me at AutoZone, having a discussion about fuel line removal tools. The line is 5/16", so the clerk said I needed a $6 metal tool which has a 3/8" and 5/16" end. There were other, more expensive packages containing 5 different sizes. They were plastic looking and had round, "wheel-like" tops. I hoped I wouldn't be stupid enough to mess up 4 more sizes of fuel lines on other cars, so I opted for the metal tool. I now, cannot figure out how to orient the tool to release whatever "teeth" are inside this collar. There doesn't appear to be any external areas on the collar to press on. The tool wouldn't fit down inside the collar...I've dug out quite a bit of the hose from inside the collar, but there's nothing for the tool to hit, so far. I left the other end alone, leaving about 1 1/2" of hose sticking up. The hose goes completely through this collar and sticks out approximately 1/4". There are no washers or o-rings. This has to be a 5 minute job for the right person...so far, it isn't me. All brilliant ideas will be humbly accepted...
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if you are referring to the rubber hose that is "crimped" to the steel line you will need to purchase the fuel rail assembly from the dealer, this may be a one piece part.
Glenn
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Thanks for the reply. I could go to that expense, but then I'd still have to hook up the hose on the other side, which would require replacing the entire metal line all the way back to the fuel pump. I can't believe it'd be that involved. More thoughts and ideas are still very much appreciated!
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appreciated!
Why not take a digital picture and send it to me so I have an idea what you are talking about. that vehicle is 15 years old, I haven't seen one of those in the shop in ages. Are you the original owner? Or has this thing been modified in a way that I just don't understand what you are talking about. You should NOT have to be replacing the steel line all the way back to the tank
Glenn
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Hey Glenn, I appreciate the level of response on this site! As for a digital picture...you found the most digitally-challenged guy on the net. I'll try to beg or borrow a camera. I know you'd take one look at this and say, "Oh, yeah..." I will also mention that this line is right beside another with the same configuration (metal-rubber hose-metal). Both are right in your face above, and to the side of the power steering pump. Right in plain sight. I rest my elbow on the passenger side strut tower to work on it. You don't remember because you were never dumb enough to put a hole through one of them. I'll attach a photo and email you at some point. By the way, I'm the 4th owner. It started life in Ohio, went to Florida, then to Davenport, Iowa. It now resides here in Rock Island, Illinois. There have been no custom mods to the car, though I'm re-doing the car just to get it up to normal. The 3rd owner disconnected the actuator arm on the turbocharger (I got in and spun the turbine around, and it spun pretty freely). Hopefully when I get the actuator arm back on, I'll have a 15 year old car with a 4 year old turbocharger in it. The car's a 5-speed, his knees were bad, so he found an automatic V6 IROC.
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The rubber hose should be attached to the steel line that runs to the fuel tank, if im not mistaken this line is fastened to it using a fuel clamp. if the line that goes to the fuel tank has the problem then yes you will need to install the complete steel line. on the other side going to the fuel rail I believe the line is crimped on and is one piece. Im not sure if Chrysler used the quick disconnect on that year/make/model.I have no shop manuals that go back that far
Glenn
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On Tue, 26 Jun 2007 05:24:45 -0400, "damnnickname"

Glenn,     If it's any help, I know that Chrysler used quick disconnects on the fuel pumps/filters on 1988 Daytonas. I can't speak for the underhood fittings, but I know that under the back end there were quick disconnects.
--
Ray Sirois
SysOp: The Lost Chord BBS
  Click to see the full signature.
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yes i am aware that the back used quick disconnects and there is also a kit out for that if they are bad, as i said, i have no manuals to look at.Therefore I still have no idea what you are referring to
Glenn
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Glenn and Ray, I'm still looking for a digital camera to document the "crime scene". The car's OK on the back end- it's still just the small section of hose in the engine bay. Until I can get pictures to someone who knows what they're doing, I'll still take all the ideas you can throw my way. When I get it straightened out, I'll post what happened, but keep the ideas coming!
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Most cell phones are capable of taking and sending pictures via the internet. Do you own one of these?
Glenn
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Glenn (and Ray), I caved in and had a discussion with a Dodge dealership and learned that the connections were indeed crimped on at the factory (no quick connect), but all I have to do is cut them off and apply fuel line clamps at each side. The fuel line removal tool question is now moot. I've got a Dremel with a cutting wheel somewhere; either that or I'll go buy a wheel for my drill. For anyone else reading this: make sure you use EFI hose when you're replacing rubber fuel line. I'd encourage anyone to use this site- the guys who responded were on me like glue trying to get my question answered. If you're new to Mopar turbo cars, use this site and 'Allpar. com' and (if you're an extreme turbo freak-with-an-unlimited-budget) 'BoostedMopar.com' (just kidding: you won't meet a nicer bunch of car maniacs). You can learn tons about your car. That's it for this problem, but I'm starting on the motor mounts soon and should be able to really mess those up too...I'll be back...
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yes you are correct about using the proper fuel line but you also forgot to mention to use the proper hose clamps, there are special clamps that have rolled edges to prevent the clamps from cutting into the line
Glenn
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On Wed, 27 Jun 2007 09:41:30 -0400, "Abishop"

I once solved a similar problem when the clamp holding a flexible air conditioner freon line failed in my car. The line was nicked by the cooling fan. I cut the flexible line at the nick and used a snug fitting 2 inch long piece of copper tubing inside the ends of the flexible tubing to rejoin the break. I used a piece of coat hanger wire under two screw clamps to complete the repair, The coat hanger wire was bent up on both ends and prevented the hose ends from separating. This repair was permanent and cost less than a dollar at that time.
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U.S. Thanks! I'll remember that one! I do everything I can to avoid dealership prices. I'm a huge fan of a local boneyard called U-pull-apart. I've saved thousands of dollars in repair costs; between my Haynes manual and someone else's junker. I repaired a power window (the track was broken) for the price of: "Have a nice day". The dealership said, "$1,050.00"
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