'99 Ram 120K miles what else to do?

'99 Ram 5.9L 4X4 automatic.
Currently I have 120K miles with little done to the engine or transmission expect a recent plenum gasket replacement and of course normal tune ups
(including distributor cap, rotar, plugs and wires), fluid changes, belt and hoses replacement, trans back flush and have no reason to doubt the engine, tranny, or axles but am planning a 4X4 trip this summer which will take use as much as 100 miles from the nearest paved road. I would hate to abandon it in the field and return with parts.
If it were your truck (specifically Tom Lawrence) what would you do?
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The first thing that comes to mind is to check the timing chain. This is relatively easy to do by removing a valve cover, and observing the amount of slack by turning the crankshaft pulley with a breaker bar/socket, and seeing how much play there is before a valve moves (roll the engine clockwise until a valve [doesn't matter which one] moves half-way down, then see how much you cal roll it back before the valve starts moving back up). A dial indicator is useful here, to know exactly when the valve moves. Any more than about 5 degrees of rotation before valve movement would indicate a worn chain.
Over 100K would make me wary of the water pump, as well. I might change that as a preventive measure, and would definitely change it if it turned out the timing chain was worn.
Beyond that, it would be more about what I would bring with me... basic things like serp. belt, oil, tranny fluid, coolant [water is fine], hose repair kit, some JB Weld (lots of potential for fixing things here... holes in radiators, oil pans, tranny pans, diff covers, etc.). I would also pick up a spare front wheel bearing. It'll run you a couple of hundred dollars, but it will be money well spent, because eventually you'll need to replace one, or both, front hub bearings. As long as you have a jack and basic tools with you (including a hammer, and 12-point sockets), you can change one of these if the need arises.
Some other things to throw in your emergency box... pick up some master cylinder plugs. With one of those, and a bottle of brake fluid, you can survive a broken brake line, by blocking off the broken line, and using just the remaining brakes (front or rear). A plug kit, some Fix-a-Flat, and a small 12V compressor will deal with most tire damage.
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On Tue, 30 Jan 2007 04:25:28 GMT, "Tom Lawrence"

feel the amount of slop when you try to rotate the dampner Up to 5 degrees or so is acceptable but beyond that and especailly if it is up around 10 or more you need to change it soon.

I would not base its replacement on timing chain condition but would change it is I had it off to replace timing chain. 100K+ on a pump is getting up there and it mau be reaching end of service life.

No mention of changinf Tcase or axle lubes. THis should have been done long ago and is often overlooked

Left out stop leak for cooling system and I would carry a low pressure radiator cap too (7 PSI) to slow leak if you get one in boonies. (I run 7 PSI caps all the time) I would carry some electrical tape to because it can do a temp repair on a radiator hose too. Basically though if you keep your ride in good order to begin with, you will not likely have problems in the wild. Look it over and if the hose or lines be it fuel or brake look questionable, replace then in your driveway, not in the wild. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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wrote:

Snip a bunch of stuff that Tom already posted.
Now, how about you answer Denny's question!!!

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How about growing up and getting a life. I do not dance on your string. When I see the trolls come out, I waste no more time with a thread. Some come here looking for help while other such as yourself come looking for trouble and nothing more. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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wrote:

Denny asked you a question based on your answer. I guess by avoiding and not answering a valid question as usual, points to another one of your BS answer's.
Some come here looking for help while other such as yourself

Told you months ago that I found your answer's wrong, dangerous, and if followed at time expensive. Further told you that I had all sort's of time to point out where your post's are BS. Sorry you don't like it, all you have to do is stop posting BS answer's. Failing that learn to live with it.
Time to adjust your sig.

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I think he was refering to having to remove the water pump in order to replace the timing chain. One of those while you're at it... PM jobs.
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Sorry snowjob, I tend to overlook your posts. As I mentioned in my original post I change _all_ fluids.

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The timing chain was my primary concern but I didn't want to mention it so people would respond without my putting that goblin in their mind. I'll certainly check it and may just go ahead and replace it and the water pump.
I carry most of the stuff you mentioned, but will go ahead and purchase a wheel bearing now.
As always, good information and thanks.
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As Tom said, timing chain is a serious concern. Something to check.
What comes to mind to me, are both the "what to pack" issues, and "how to go about the trip".
Tires. Being 100 miles from the paved, I'd want a spare wheel. Tire plug kit, Fix a Flat, and the lighter socket power air compressor. Tires are a serious concern. Farmer jack might be useful, in addition to the scissors jack. Breaker bar and impact socket set.
The other concern which came to mind is getting stuck. Definitely have a come-along winch, and chain and rope. I've gotten my truck stuck in the mud one time, where I had a tree in the right dirction, but no come along tool. That was embarassing. If possible, travel with another group, and take turns going ahead.
Communication. I'd bring the cell phone, even if you think you won't be in service area. Sometimes you can get a signal from a hill top, or top of a tree. CB and FRS are also good for short range comms. Satelite phone, I've never used one but hear they are expensive but worth it.
Fluids. Gasoline comes to mind. Please buy good gasoline, such as Mobil or Exxon. Nevermind the save 2 cents a galon crap gasoline. And a couple bottles of alcohol drygas. Water, both for you to drink and also for the vehicle cooling system. Oil, and transmission fluid. In a pinch, you can use Dexron II in place of motor oil to get you out of a spot. Dexron II also used as steering fluid. Brake fluid. Couple cans of ether starting spray.
Plan on maybe having to spend a night in a tent. Unless that's already part of the plans. Tent, and multiple ways to light and kindle a camp fire. Lighter, matches flint.
First aid kit. And medications you usually take, plus the ones you don't want to need (pack the pain pills you got after your last dentist apointment).
I'd suggest to post this question to alt.survival and misc.survivalism and rec.backcountry where you will get different (and possibly better) advice than what I've written.
Generally, the part that breaks is the one you left home.
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Christopher A. Young
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Thanks for the advice. I carry all that stuff and more. For this trip I'll even take 2 spare tires.

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more from my beach playing day's. A couple of 2x12's a foot long to put the jack on, in case your in mud or sand. Also some other blocking just in case. If need be you can always burn it. A air tank, a compressor is good but sometimes not fast enough to catch the repaired area of a tire. The ones where ya rip the sidewall a bit on a rock and have a handful of plugs and slime in the tire. A hunk of that blue plastic 9x12, folds up small and gives you something to lie on, keeps you dry. Also make's a stretcher for worse case situations.
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Here's a good checklist: http://www.offroaders.com/tech/Offroaders_Checklist.htm
--
Ken



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truck/trailer big enough or all the permits needed to take it all with us.<VBG> Boy, they sure cover it though. Thanks for the link.
Roy
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And how! I by no means carry every thing they list, especially in the way of spare parts (thus the reason for my original post), but a few things I think they missed are: Axe JB weld (can be used on fuel lines, gas tanks, oil pans, etc.) Spare distributor cap and rotor Sorbent Material for containing and/or cleaning spilled fluids First Aid -Naproxen as an anti-inflammatory and anti-menstrual cramping aid -Moleskin for use on blisters -Cough suppressants -Mouth barrier for CPR -Eye, nose, mouth shield
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Best list I've seen in awhile. Of course, the list presumes that you know a bit about how to use each of the tools. I'd guess that most of the folks on this list are good repair persons.
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Christopher A. Young
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Y'all fergot the most important thing!! BEER!! Oh yeah, and don't ferget spare fuses for your heated seats!!
;^)
Mike

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I hadn't thought of that. I take coveralls incase I need to crawl under, but a tarp would make finding dropped parts a lot easier too.
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Ed H. wrote:

Or like me. I always end up with a screw or too extra after I put things back together. I always wonder how those things multiply when I have something apart. Either that or I'm seeing double from the beer.
Bob
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