94 Taurus Engine stalls after a long trip, why?, Please Help!

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Hello All
I have a 1994 Taurus wagon with a 3.8 V6, the car runs fine, well it did until now. We took a trip out of town, the trip took about 1.5 hours,
(almost all freeway, averaged 60 mph on cruise) and ended with a long upward hill. When we stopped at a gas station the car would not idle properly, ran rough, and then stalled. After about 15 minutes the car started and ran ok, we were at our destination so we parked for the night. The next day the car started and ran like normal so we returned home, the car again after about 1.5 hours of freeway driving started to act up, first the check engine light start coming on, then going out, as well as noticeable power loss when trying to accelerate. When we pulled off the freeway and the car stalled at the first stop sign. We were able to inch the car home, each time stopping for about 10 minutes or until the car would start and run to the next stop sign or light.
Now I am confused, a friend told me that it may be the catalytic converter, how and why? these parts are very expensive, I do not want to go about trying to fix this problem with a trial and error approach.
I have only owned the car for the last 6 months and have no maintenance history.
I thank anyone who responds to my post, as I would like to know something before I have to take it in to the dealership.
Cheers Neil
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please respond to me directly, thanks neil

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Why would you want people to respond in email? the idea of this newsgroup is to have things posted publicly, so that others can also learn and/or use the information.

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yes I fully understand that, I don't always have acess to this newgroup and a response is very important to me at this time. If they want to respond to both, so much the better.

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If it is that important to you, you will obtain access to the newsgroup. You can access it at google groups. And your local library should have computers connected to the internet.
Jeff
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Neil.... no one in their right mind will respond by email now that we've seen people post on here just to gather good email addresses...
sorry, blame spammers!
And as said... you can just find any web-capable PC and look it up on google groups.
Teknical opined in

--
- Yes, I'm a crusty old geezer curmudgeon.. deal with it! -

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It could be overheating.
I had the same problem when I forgot to put coolant back in my old 289 after putting a different pair of heads on it. The heads had large chambers so compression was lower and I expected power to be lower. So I ran the car for a week with virtually no coolant. The overheat light never triggered because I accidentally broke the sender (it was a bad day). Anyhow, running on teh highway it was gutless. Stopping for a toll booth it stalled and didn't wanna start. Took me a minute to get it started again and then it ran alright once I got moving again. Finally I remembered I forgot to fill the coolant system so I pulled over and filled it. Problem solved. More power and didn't run rough or stall. Of course I had gone a few hundred miles with no coolant already, but no harm was done. Those 289s sure are tough little engines!
So, make sure your coolant system is full and your thermostat is working. Also, you may wanna check that your temp sensor is working and your overheat light bulb is not burnt out or otherwise non-functional.
An engine can overheat for several reasons other than that, such as retarded timing, malfunctioning fan, malfunctioning EGR valve, I suppose O2 sensors could cause it as well.
Anyhow, it's just something that may be worth checking.
Cory
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wrote:

lmfao
hurc ast
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I believe you are the resident troll, but I don't recall so I'll explain anyway. A malfuctioning EGR system can lean out the mixture. A malfunctioning O2 sensor may result in giving an false rich reading, the computer will compensate by leaning out the mixture. A leaner mixture burns hotter, raising combustion chamber temps and thus the temperature of the entire engine. Also, an excessively lean mixture can burn holes in pistons and do some real nasty damage.
Cory
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The EGR gasses displaces the oxygen, so in effect the mixture is not lean. There is less oxygen to support combustion.

The mixture that the ECM provides will never get to that point.

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"pick one" <try again!> wrote in message

A malfunctioning EGR valve can not add any exhaust gas. I didn't say _how_ it was malfunctioning, just that it was...

Interesting. How do you know this? Where did you read it, or more importantly, where can I read it? How about this hypothetical situation in which the O2 sensors are reading rather rich when the mixture is in fact just fine. What does the computer do? What does it do when the mixture leans to the point that it starts pinging and it cuts back on timing as the knock sensors tell it the engine is suffering pre-detonation? A lean mixture and retarded timing will certainly cause higher engine temps, and retarded timing can easily overheat an engine.

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The job of the EGR is to PUT EXHAUST into the intake air. That is how ERG functions. By introducing a non-combustible gas into the intake it lowers combustion temperatures. An EGR will only fail in two ways open or closed. If it fails open? The combustion process is greatly impeded because the oxygen content of the intake air is reduced. It is not a lean mixture, the ratio of fuel to gas is the same, the only change is the composition of the gas, it's now more inert. That is how NOX is controlled. It was by accident that engineers found it also helped with knock, a nice side effect. Stuck closed? The engine will not over heat, might have some mild ping under load, most likely not enough to cause damage if all other systems are ok.

That will cost you, it's called class room training. You can also buy materials to learn what is going on.

That will not happen. Because of all the variables it is impossible to have a mixture that is just fine, as a result of this fact the ECM uses the O2's to determine if the mixture is too rich or lean. Typically the O2 when failing does not respond; the voltage signal says constant. That alone is enough to cause the ECM too know there is something amiss. When the ECM has an O2 that does not switch, it try's to make it switch to test it.

First off not all engines have knock sensors, second the ones that do; do not work in the way you are implying. When the ECM sees a signal from the knock sensor it only retards the timing a few degrees at most, it does not keep going until it does not see the signal any more.

This is not a race engine we are talking about, this is a production engine with the average compression ratios of 9:1 at the most for high performance engines, most are in the range of 8:1. The only thing that is going to happen is low power, lean mixtures are the result of not enough fuel volume which causes low pressure under load.

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wrote:

No, a fuel injected engine running lean will run colder. Move into the '80s...
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Intersting. How will a lean mixture burn colder? Car engines run richer that stoicheometric. Stoich is quite 'lean' for automotice engien standards and will burn too hot, causing damage to parts. I'm curious, if you are correct in that fuel injected engines running the same lean mixture as a carbureted engine will burn colder than a carbureted engine, please explain how that is. Leaner burns hotter, the flame front on the cylinder does not 'see' the fuel inject or carb. All it 'sees' is the air/fuel ratio, so how the air and fuel were mixed is irrelevant, or at elast should be as far as anything I was ever tought. Anyhow, please elaborate and explain how an engine running a relatively lean mixture will run colder with fuel injection than it would with a carburetor delivering that same mixture.
Cory
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wrote:

Wrong! That is true with a carbureted engine, but the opposite happens with a fuel injected engine. And you are talking about a Taurus, not a 289/302.
To the original poster, have you tried a new TFI module?
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Bad catalyic convertors can cause the engine to overheat because most of the heat is removed by the exahuast, and if the exhaust gas doesn't leave as fast, the heat stays behind.
Jeff

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If the exhaust does not leave the engine can not take in fresh air. Because of the lack of oxygen fuel does not burn. Because fuel does not burn no heat.

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"pick one" <try again!> wrote in message

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"pick one" <try again!> wrote in message

That sounds good on paper but it's not really true in the real world. Think in terms of really bad efficiency, throttle at 50 or 75% just to maintain speed and the trans will probably be in 2nd or 3rd instead of OD. Soon things are smoking hot. Bob
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go any where. It's not only good on paper but it's a fact because of the basic laws of science.
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